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Great Community Mobilization & Leadership Workshop ! Teaching Strategy for Problem Solving

Dear all,

Here is the outline of a workshop I participated in recently, presented by the Canadian HIV/AIDS group, CTAC. It's a great, simple approach to problem solving and developing successful strategies for getting what you want on any issue. Check it out -- Anne-christine

APPENDIX I – Community Mobilization & Leadership Workshop

Community Mobilization & Leadership

Workshop Overview

• Introductions
• What is Community Mobilization & Leadership and why do this?
• Assessing the Issues
• Researching the Issues
• Making a Plan
• Carrying out the Plan
• Measuring Results
• Planning Next Steps

What do Community Mobilization & Leadership mean?

“A leader is a dealer in hope.” Napoleon Bonapart
“A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be.” Rosalynn Carter
“Some leaders are born women.” Anonymous

Community mobilization is mobilizing people to speak out for a cause or course of action.

What is Community Mobilization & Leadership?

4 Types:

Mobilizing yourself
Leading and mobilizing for another person
Leading and mobilizing for a group
Leading and mobilizing to change a system

What is Leading and Mobilizing?

Leading and Mobilizing to Change a System

Changing the way systems provide treatment or services so that many people benefit now and in the future

Why lead and mobilize to change the system?

To make the public aware of an issue

To be the voice calling for changes that will make the whole system better

Mobilizing and leading to change a system helps the largest number of people

The 5 Principles of Community Mobilization & Leadership

1. Be a voice for those you are leading

The 5 Principles of Community Mobilization & Leadership

2. Create the environment to empower those around you.

The 5 Principles of Community Mobilization & Leadership

3. Do your research

The 5 Principles of Community Mobilization & Leadership

4. Respect privacy

The 5 Principles of Community Mobilization & Leadership

5. Use the style you are most comfortable with and is most appropriate to the situation

What is Community Mobilization & Leadership?

Assess the Issue

Describe what the issue is and how the system is creating barriers to solving the issue.

Who does the issue affect?
Who are you mobilizing and leading?
Find out exactly what they want you to do for them.

Researching the issue
Identifying the Key Players

Decision makers
Friends and allies
Opponents
Undecided
Media
Other key players

Identifying the Key Players

Who are the DECISION-MAKERS?

Who needs to hear what we are saying?
What are their motives?

Identifying the Key Players

Who are our FRIENDS AND ALLIES?

Who else shares this issue?
What are their motives?

Identifying the Key Players

Who are our OPPONENTS?

Who will try to stop us?
What are their motives?

Identifying the Key Players

Who are the UNDECIDED?

Who is on the fence?
What are their motives?

Identifying the Key Players

What MEDIA attention can we get?

What are the media’s motives?

Identifying the Key Players

Who are the OTHER KEY PLAYERS?

Who else could play a part in our plan?

What are their motives?
Making a Plan

What is a Plan for Action?

What is a Plan for Action?

A plan for action shows who is involved at each stage of planning, carrying out and evaluating the plan

Making a Plan

What are we trying to do?
Who is responsible for the plan?
Who are we trying to reach?
What is our time-frame?
How much will it cost?
What background information do we need?
What’s next?

Making a Plan

What is a budget?

Why should you develop a budget as part of your plan for action?

Developing a Budget

For larger activities, identify what costs are involved in your plan, (such as photocopying, travel, postage and food for an event). Do this early in the planning stage and decide who is responsible for paying for what.

Making a Plan

Will a public or private plan help you to achieve your goal?

What does the person/group that can make the decision to make the change that you need want themselves? What are their needs?

Private and Public Plans

Private
Meetings with Politicians, Bureaucrats, Companies,
Other Players

Public
Media Work, Press Conferences, Demonstrations, Public Speaking Engagements

Carrying out a Plan

Example of a Private Plan: Face-to-face meeting
 Write out the purpose and what you will say.
 Do you need any background information?
 Practice responses to possible questions.

Carrying out a Plan

Example of a Public Plan:
Information Session
Who should be involved with the planning?
Who should attend the session?
What promotion needs to be done, and how?
How much will it cost? How much will it save?
What message(s) do you want to get across?

Evaluation

Why are we evaluating?
What are we evaluating?
How do we evaluate?
What’s next?

Why are we evaluating?

Maintain focus on our goals
Help us adapt and refine our strategy
Point out (new) directions and goals
Keep us “in the know” of key players
Record and document what has been done
What lessons did we learn?

What are we evaluating?

Were the people that we mobilized and led pleased with the results?
Did we achieve our identified goal(s)?
Were we satisfied with our plan for action?
Is it worth our time and energy to continue?

How do we evaluate?

What are some evaluation methods that we can use?
Surveys, interviews
Focus groups
Journals and communication logs
Website “hits”
Mailing List
What else?

What’s Next?

 What do the people that we are mobilizing and leading want to see happen next?
 If we did not achieve all of our identified goals, how do we decide which one(s) to tackle next?
 Are there new developments related to this issue?

Things to remember

Persistence
Fatigue
Expenses
Competing interests
Staff and volunteer change/turnover

5 Principles of Community Mobilization & Leadership

1. Be a voice for other people.
2. Do your research.
3. Respect privacy and confidentiality.
4. Use the style that you are most comfortable with and is appropriate for the situation(s).
5. Create the environment to empower those around you.

What is Community Mobilization & Leadership?
Case Study

 What is the issue?
 Who is affected by the issue?
 What are their goals by mobilizing and leading?
 What are their strategies (private and public)?
 Who are the key players?
 How will those affected evaluate success?
 What’s next?

Contact us:
Canadian Treatment Action Council
555 Richmond Street West, P.O. Box 203, Suite 1109B
Toronto, Ontario M5V 3B1
Telephone and Fax: +1 (416) 410-1369
Email: ctac@ctac.ca
Website: www.ctac.ca

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