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My story

I spent sixteen years since 1993s, when I was fifteen years old , I'm living in Abs city( rural city) and doing support to women in a small villages. To erase their illiteracy then I support them to complete their Secondary and university levels education.
In general ,my society and my father didn't accept My desire in complete my education, But I have not surrendered. I combated and struggled to be completed secondary school and university. In addition, I graduated from the Faculty of Medicine as a doctor (Gynecologist). These difficulties prompted me to help Women of my villages that deprived of education. Moreover, when my father showed my work and my Practical impact on women, supported me and helped me to continue in my role. That's right if you have a father who supports you, you can do a lot of things that society does not easily accept’.
Some common themes emerge. One is the vital importance of education for girls. Several struggled to be educated, including one who went to school without her father’s knowledge. Both conflict with fathers, and the importance of support from them and other family members, are prominent.
In Aug 1996 I established Abs Development For Women & Children and worked voluntarily for various issues. See www,absyemen.org
I played a very large part in a lot of people’s lives and hopefully some of my inspiration will have left an impression on those surrounding me.
We get a sense of massive achievement, and a massive amount remaining to be done. There are striking examples of what individuals have achieved: ‘I feel that I have positively influenced the women of the region. Each father who previously took his daughter out of school, has now brought her back. Mothers use me as an example to encourage their daughters to continue their education’; and also of the constraints that come with achievement: ‘being the model of the educated girl, I have to be very careful in my behaviour. ’ Some have combined the roles of wife and mother with a professional career. Another says that sadly ‘women still have to make a choice between marriage and work’.
Despite what I've done in my community to develop and build it in Education ,Health and women's rights, in general women still suffer from discrimination. Another makes the point that there are women in powerful positions, but they are a mere handful: ‘What about the women at the grassroots? There is no doubt that they are oppressed by men whose behaviour is based on the backward customs of a male dominated society, but has nothing to do with Islam. ’
While not representative or typical, women like these are pivotal for the future. They have pushed at boundaries. These women struggled, consciously, on behalf of all: ‘We have to fight for our rights and even if I cannot enjoy the fruit of my struggle, the next generation will. ’
I think we will change the way people think about Yemeni women.by that can be considered as an encouragement to determined women to stand against any difficulties they face in their lives.’
I met many difficulties, but perseverance and determination made me the first physician in Abs -Yemen and the first pioneer in the development work.
No justice without women's rights and no development with discrimination against women. Therefore, I advise the Arab world, to give Arab women the right to life in order to get up and keep pace with the world. Ignorant society is a society in which women's oppression.

Dr.Aisha Thawab

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