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"History, Thought again!"

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She asked me, “Don’t you think you left your country on time? You are lucky than the people who are suffering in your country.”I smiled to her but did not answer because I don’t think she would have expected the answer I had in my head.

I don’t exactly remember where but once I read that “It is good to know about our history, but it is better not to repeat it.”

Few months ago, my country, Nepal, got a new face; new promises for a change and new leaders to lead. Before the revolution, my friends were frustrated to live in a country where their lives and future were at risk. Many people wished that their sons (not daughters) were in some foreign countries so they could move there. (Still the feelings have not gone) But how did I feel?

I know wishes to be with one’s family in the most insecure times is obvious. Being homesick when away from family is natural. But the time when maybe even my parents had wished they would have been in some other countries; I wished I had been in my own country. This was the answer in my head. It’s not just my patriotic feeling or that I wanted to be involved in the revolution. I wanted to be a part of my country’s history.

When the lady told me that I was fortunate than the people who were suffering in my country, I totally disagreed with her in my head. Instead, I thought I was unlucky to be separated from my history. I know physical presence doesn’t always matter. We can contribute in our country’s development from any part of the world. But for me I wanted to be with my countrymen, share the pain they were suffering and join hands with the people who were working to solve the problems.

In future, I wanted to tell people about the history and aware them not to repeat it. My presence in my country would have become my support. George Santayana has said that “those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it,” and I believe it’s true. I don’t want to see the blood of my brothers and sisters again, and I believe nobody would want to.

By telling all this, I did not mean that I regret to be in a foreign land. I am here for a good cause; to build my career, to be empowered and go back to my country and develop it. What made me uncomfortable were the thoughts of people who wanted to escape when our country was facing the most important days in the history. I wonder would moving to other place comfort them.

Comments

Araceli's picture

History... and beyond

Dear Prabi,

First of all, thank you for your comment to my post on Teaching and Activism, thank you also because that note gave me the chance to read your journal and found an amazing woman speaking with honesty and passion.

I am a historian who writes about how History (with capital H) deeply affects the history of people. I write about women's lives and women's stories within their own cultural setting. My subjects are women like you, and the reason I write about History and histories is because most people don't understand how History is experienced, lived, processed, and even transformed in women's bodies. I lived in Cuba for two years, studying women's lives, and your story although very far away in geographical distance is very close in lived experiences. Fifty years have passed for many of the women who left Cuba to go into exile, to a "better" and most prosperous life, to a more "democratic" system, and after all these fifty years many of them are still mourning the separation from their country, not just for patriotism, but because like you they wanted to be part of the History and the history of their people, of their land, of the place they called home.

Your voice transpires the pain of separation and displacement. Sometimes that pain only goes away, or mitigates, when the next generation, your children, go back to the homeland and start rewriting the History, incorporating the history of those who left because it is also a crucial part of those who remained.

All the blessings for you dear Prabi. Mother Earth feels pain for your pain and joy when you are happy.
Araceli

Dear Prabi,
It's true that the History of Nepal have pain of separation and displacement among us. As a good citizen of our country I do feel so. We are also in a foreign country to educated and understand the real world. It is a best way to understand problems and find innovative solution. We will return back after our graduation from our university to empower other women. I hope many displaced people have same dream to return back to Nepal and do something to bring change in people lives.
We need to do something to bring peace and equality for our next generation.
Lets hand together to make aware to our current government not to repeat the same history Again.
Happy New Year Prabi.
With Love
Sunita Basnet

With Love and Regards
Sunita Basnet

prabisha's picture

Thank you

Dear Araceli,

I am so glad that through Pulse Wire I have met inspiring person like you. I am so happy to know that you are a historian and you write about women's life. Thank you so much for sharing your experience of Cuba.

I hope the existing and coming generation of my country would soon realise the importance of knowing one's history and pride of being a part of it.

Thank you for your wishes.

With warm regards,
Prabi

Peace
Prabi

prabisha's picture

Together we can ...

Dear Sunita,

It always feels so good to have encouraging friends like you around. I cannot wait to be back home and work for our country people. I hope we will be able to make a little change at least in our society. But again small effort adds upto big result.

So, lets wake our government and people as well, and lets pray for brighter days to rise with the sunrise of coming new year.

Warm wishes to you on NEW YEAR.

With kind regards,
Prabi

Peace
Prabi

angela saunders's picture

Work it!

Prabi,
You know what you should do....be part of the revolution. Set up a blog, a website - a network. Distance is only what we make it. I know that physically being far away makes life more difficult, but you can still be part of what is happening at home. It is a bit of a challenge, and alot of work. But be creative, think outside the box about how you can still participate and be an important part of something that is happening at home. Plus, where you are now can give you the opportunity to get those who are not from Nepal involved. Educate them, let them know what is happening in our country, and gain their support. WIth a strong support net work, you will have the love and support you need.
Keep on working!
Ms Angela

prabisha's picture

Thank you

Dear Ms. Angela,

I will think of ways to get connected to what is happening in my country despite this physical distance. Thank you so much for showing me some ways I can aware about our history. You have always been one of my sources of inspiration.

I wish you happiness and joys for this and coming years.
Happy New Year.

With kind regards,
Prabi

Peace
Prabi

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