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discrimination around me......

Though I born in a consergative, male dominated society of Bangladesh, but I was a lucky one that in my childhood I never got introduced with the reality of my society. Bangladesh, where every single girls are discriminated by the society as well as their family, here my family never showed me the difference betwen men and women .So, for a long time I stayed away from the so-called society rules or discrimination.

My society was never late to show me the discrimination against women. Gradually I also started learning the difference rules for men and women such as, society is empowered by the men, family decissions are taken by men, best facilities are deserved by men, while women are the marginalized part of the society. I got discovered that it is only a wriiten document of Bangladesh Constitution that men and women are equel, while the reality is totally different.

I grew up among all these discrimination and find out myself as a liberal one; here the credit directly goes to my family.From my childhood I always have some different inspiration and ideas from my society people, perhaps they could find me as a strange one.I still remember the day when I got admitted in a well-known,co-education college, where most of the students were boys. Though my parent allowed me but I couldn't forget the expression of my neighbors and relatives.Even though they explained me why didn't they send their doughters to this college as it is not OK for a girl to study among all these boys.

However, I did my Higher-Secondary exam from that college and now studying in a university. Still now I have different ideas from my society.In my life thousands of time I faced the discrimination, though most of the time tried to overcome that. But what about my friends, relatives and other women of society, I just wonder how are they doing???

Comments

ShukThi's picture

some are relatively lucky

Hello Samanta,

I was struck by some of the similarities between our childhood experiences. I grew up in southern India, and I too was fortunate to have a progressive family. My mother, especially was an amazingly strong woman and a die-hard feminist. She made sure to bring me up with the firm conviction that girls were equal to boys, and that I could do anything I wanted. One difference from your post, though, in my upbringing, was that my family also pointed out the discrimination that existed outside our home. Indeed there was no way to avoid it. I remember that my classmates, teachers and playmates outside the home always made a big fuss about me being a tomboy, and were shocked at the amount of freedom I had. The girls in my class had to help their mother in the kitchen while their brothers played outside, even when we were all in elementary school.

I certainly owe my family a debt I can never repay for not crushing my spirit as a young girl, like I saw happen to so many of my classmates.

And as for the rest of the women we know, it is our duty and our mission to fight for their rights, no?

Soumya

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