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Introducing myself and my journal: ordinary seaman

About Me:
MY BIOGRAPPHY
I came into this world on the cold evening of October 08, 1991. Born in Birnin kebbi, a town in the Kebbi state of Nigeria, or so I was told. My parents, Yusuf Mohammed and Aliyu Fatima had five kids which am the third of the family and my immediate junior is late. And. I live with my parent, Aminu; my brother, Shema’u; my sister. When I was born, my brother was three-years-old and hid under the table from me. Aminu is a sweet kid and he would do anything for me, but like all brothers and sisters we fight like cats and dogs. Sometimes when no one was around, Aminu would come up to me and beat me for no reason. I still love him but only because he is my brother.

MY FAMILY BACKGROUND.

My mother and my father are the complete of each other culturally. Fatima, my mother, had lived in Minna, her brothers and her father was in the military. She grew up with the Nigerian Army and had spent only a couple of summers in Minna. However, she spoke Zuru, Hausa and English. On the other hand, my father had lived in Kaliko all his life before joining the Nigerian Army and his brother and his father were in the Railway Cooperation of Nigeria. He spoke Gwagi, Zuru, and Hausa, English and was raised in a very typical dakarkari family. Therefore, I guess I'm sort of stuck between both cultures. You might be asking yourself how the two of them ever ended up together even though they are so different. Well, both of them are architects and they met while my mother was in Minna.

CHILDHOOD.

The majority of my early memories from childhood are somewhat vague, but for the first years of my life, I mostly spent the day either crying or sleeping, as babies do. A year later I began walking around my house, or what I remember as taking a couple steps and then stumbling awkwardly onto the floor. I also began to utter my first spoken words in both English and Hausa Language.

In 1994 at the bright age of three, I was enrolled at a command nursery and primary where I would learn children's songs or play in the sandbox all morning and spend my afternoons watching the Disney channel at home. Most of my vacations included long and tedious trips to both parent villages, with the purpose of visiting my grandparents. During the weekends we'd visit my paternal grandparents and relatives in Kaliko and Igade respectively. It pretty much stayed that way some time.

Once kindergarten was over with, and upon my mother's insistence, I entered a high school in Ibadan Oyo state where I studied. In that same period my sister Shema’u was born and she came into the family. Everything seemed perfect in my life at that point: I was doing great at school; my family was great, I was as happy kid.

Who I am in life.
My name is Yusuf Ado Mohammed. I started school when I was three-years-old. I went to command nursery and primary school and while I was there, I won an award for perfect attendance. I also won an award for honor roll all four terms. Then I attended eleyele junior high school 1, and there I also won a couple of awards: one for perfect attendance and two for being named Student of the term--one in 2nd grade and the other in 3rd grade. I am now a senior at eleyele High School. I plan on finishing school and maybe going to a university.
What life means to me.
Life to me means friends and family who you can trust and who trusts you. I am pretty much on the happy side of life, but like all teens I do I have my "days of." That means I do have some sad days or depressed days. I have a few friends here that sort of look out for me and when I am having a bad day, I have someone here at school to talk to. That Abdul-Aziz Amina make my school days go by thinking of either the next hour or what I will do when I get home or on the weekend. I'm not seeing anyone now but when I did have a girlfriend, our favorite places to go were the golf club and out to dinner. Only once we went to an amusement park: Universal Studios. We were together for three years and then we broke-up; so no, I don't think it was for now.

ADOLESCENCE.

At the age of fifteen I was through with junior high school. A couple of weeks earlier I'd been accepted to enroll at the command senior high school. Command is a boarding school in a small student town called Apete, I had never lived abroad, or alone for that matter, hence was a bit reluctant to the idea of leaving by myself. My grandparents who had lived in Kaliko and Igade respectively. For many years had moved to Minna by then. A couple of months earlier they had decided to no longer, thus my nearest relatives where now in wushishi eight hours away.

While I was at Oyo State I played soccer for the junior tornadoes team in the evenings and took the Amtrak and traveled around the area on weekends. No one was allowed to leave the campus during the weekdays but that wasn't a real problem since the campus premises included most of the town and I'd easily find ways to keep myself busy.

After what has seemed to be the longest year of my life, I returned to Mokola barracks Ibadan and moved in with my parent and sister. This decision was against the will of my grandparents (I had a four year scholarship at Rohi International Collage and they considered I would miss out on a great opportunity). The main reason I came back was that because of being so far away I'd only visit my family twice a year. At that time I just didn't feel ready for that. And besides I was not a indigene of Oyo state

I applied for entry at the Raoter computer collage and continued my studies there. A hectic period in my teenage years had concluded and I was able to slow down and enjoy my family. I matured quite a bit and built up my self-confidence and independence.

The past three years I lived in Mokola barracks. In my time of leisure I'd mountain bike through different trails in the vicinity or travel with my family. I also had time to think about what I wanted to study and took day trips to universities nearby.

After I graduated from the Raoter computer collage a few months ago, I began studying at the Easy Computer Institutes where I'm study computer engineering. My brother and I are living together in a small apartment in barracks, yet we manage to leave, After I graduate from the institutes I got admission into Nigerian Navy Basic training School,onne rivers state, After Nine months of training and studying I finish with the rank of ordinary seaman.

What's my outlook on the future?
The year 2014 will make nine years since I graduated from high school. I think I will probably be still living here in Kaduna. I will be quite comfortable with my living situation, meaning that I will be married to Fatima Usman Lawan currently staying in Maiduguri borno state. We will have at least eight children: Fatima Usman Lawan who at that point will be a-years-older than me. Fatima is a sweet lady; she will do anything for anyone. She is five feet tall and built well. She has baby blue eyes and blond hair. We will have been together for a years and will be happy together--this is forever
Working experience
After my graduation I was drafted to Nigerian navy computer training school along with fifty two of my course mate but one of us was late on the way, we land at Nigerian navy ship Quorra at harbor road apapa Lagos, that was my mother ship I served their for six months pulse then I was drafted to Nigerian navy directorate of non-public funds Lagos island Maloney as a computer operator I work there for almost a year then a advance draft to Arm forces simulation Center as a work station operator. Jaji Kaduna state
What's comes next?

I am now twenty two years old. After this phase I'd like to continue my education and marry as well, but I'm still not sure it, I just might change my mind and do otherwise, although I haven't come up with what that something else could be.
Conclusion
As I said in the beginning, I was born in Birnin kebbi, kebbi state of Nigeria and I've lived here my whole life. I would like to see more of the Nigeria but unfortunately, I don't have any money to leave Nigeria to go anywhere right now. I hope you have enjoyed reading my life story as much as I have enjoyed writing it for you. Try to get as much as you can out have school; you're only there for twelve years and when you graduate, you're home free. Here's a tip for you to live or try to live by: If you think it, it can be done.

My Passions:
computer

My Challenges:
mathematics

My Vision for the Future:
helping people

My Areas of Expertise:
computer

Comments

Nusrat Ara's picture

Dear friend, Welcome to

Dear friend,

Welcome to WorldPulse! You are now part of a thriving community of women from all parts of the world. See the Online Community Getting Started Guide to learn more about networking in our community: http://www.worldpulse.com/pulsewire/about/guide

Please explore the site to meet the women and also find the groups of your interest.

I look forward to hearing your voice in the community!

In friendship,

Nusrat

Anita Muhanguzi's picture

Welcome to World Pulse

Dear Teemlat,
You are most welcome to this great platform. I encourage you to take advantage of the resources on this great platform and get to know as many members as you possibly can. I would encourage you to also participate in the Women weave the web campaign.

I look forward to hearing your voice on this great platform.

Mrs. Anita Kiddu Muhanguzi
Head of Legal and Advocacy
Centre for Batwa Minorities
a.kiddu@gmail.com
cfmlegal@gmail.com
Skype: mrs_muhanguzi

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