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EXPECTATIONS...

The other day I was listening to a discussion. It was about the political condition of my country. Just for information, I want to mention the ruling party's leader and the most influential opposition party's leader, both are women. The discussion was going on its own pace about what the leaders are doing, how they are effecting the country's economical and social issues. In the middle of the discussion one of the speakers told, "THESE ARE WOMEN. DON'T EXPECT MUCH FROM THEM." After this, the other speaker said, "THEY DO NOT REALLY USE THEIR OWN KNOWLEDGE. THEY JUST LISTEN TO THEIR ADVISERS".
After hearing this, I was thinking why would these guys say such insulting things for some one like a leader. If you consider a place like my country (Bangladesh), majority of the families are run by males. So most of the families are dominated by the males. I don't know about all the families, but I know some families where the women are not treated in a way they should be. For example, I have seen families where, if the husband is taking a decision, the wife cannot ask questions on his decision. The husband will just give a look expressing "YOU DID SOMETHING WHICH YOU ARE NOT ALLOWED TO DO" or say something like "DO YOU HAVE THE CAPABILITY/ AUTHORITY TO TAKE THE DECISION" or he may not say anything at all. Just ignore the wife as if he doesn't even hear anything.
If any discussion on any topic regarding women is done by men from these families, you cannot really expect something good from them. I know the country's situation is not good. I also blame my leaders for the situation of the country. But why do you have to say "THESE ARE WOMEN. DON'T EXPECT MUCH FROM THEM.". Syria is in a very critical situation now. So, what about that country? Is the leader a female? So what are you going to comment on him.
Before commenting something like this every man should remember, about the Nigerian queen Amina who was a great military leader, the Angolan queen Mbande Nzinga who resisted the Portuguese from occupying all of what is now known as Angola, the British Prime Minister "The Iron Lady"- Margaret Thatcher and of course Indira Gandhi, the Indian Prime Minister.
What I'm trying to say is, if you want to make a comment, just make the comment for that individual person. Don't generalize. Don't point fingers on the people whom you don't know even.

Comments

Kim Crane's picture

Oh, this makes me angry!

Oh, this makes me angry! There is a lot in this post that gets my blood boiling. Of course "don't expect much from them" directed to women is truly awful. The piece of this that I just can't get over is that these speakers were using the idea of collaborative leadership as an insult. I think it is dangerous if anyone in a leadership position thinks that all of their knowledge is "their own," that it didn't come from families and teachers and mentors and wise and experienced people throughout their lives. And it is concerning that there are those in leadership positions who think that collaboration is just for women, and without value, and that listening to advisors is somehow a bad thing for a leader to do. Scary.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts and feelings on this issue, which I assure you is not just limited to Bangladesh!

samswork's picture

I know Kim. It's definitely

I know Kim. It's definitely not limited in Bangladesh. People like these are everywhere. I wish I had a magic wand to solve all the problems. I hate being a silent audience of all the injustice and crimes happening world wide.

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