Community Update

Digital Empowerment Toolkit Now Available!

At World Pulse, we recognize the need for ongoing learning—for you and for your community! Our toolkits aim to provide the resources you need to advance your social change work.

We are excited to introduce our Digital Empowerment Trainers’ Toolkit, a dynamic resource to help you bring the benefits of connecting online to women in your community. Check it out today! »

The Education Arena: Same Old Script, Different Actors, Decades Later

It is a very cold dawn in rural Western Kenya, as 13 year old Jane Muhonja (name changed), a total orphan starts the long 5 kilometer hilly trek from Gagiremba village to Gimomoi Primary school, both in Vihiga County, where she is a class 7 pupil. She has to be in class by 7 am, which means that the latest she can leave home is 5 am, the danger to her person from natural and human attacks at such an early hour notwithstanding. This is a daily journey on school going days that she started 3 years ago, when she was kicked out of a nearer school for reporting sexual harassment and assault by a male senior teacher.
“He used to ask me to collect the exercise books after his afternoon lessons on Thursdays and carry them for him to the office for marking. He was usually alone and would praise me and give me gifts like stationery and even cash. I was happy at first because I couldn’t have survived in school without his generosity, until he started fondling my private parts,” Jane says as tears course down her cheeks.

There are countless girls who share Jane’s shoes. Male teachers preying on their unsuspecting charges, more often than not from very poor backgrounds, some as young as 6 years old are just one of the detrimental handicaps that befall education for girls in Western Province, which is located 400+ kilometers away from the capital city of Kenya, Nairobi.
Sylvia Matoni is an Assistant Director at the Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, a haven that champions education for the girl child in Western Kenya. When she heard of Jane’s story, she took the issue in her own hands and reported the incident to the area District Education office, hoping for a helping hand.
“It becomes so hard for girls like Jane to adjust to their new status, as ‘marked’ girls in the community, especially so if their tormentors go scot free. This affects not only their confidence and self esteem, but their education as well,” Sylvia says.

Pamela Chiboli, a teacher at the Sisters of Mary Hostel, Shibuye Girls’ Primary school says that education for girls is marred by a myriad of challenges, though sexual harassment while in school tops the list. However, other factors include the economy of the day, which leaves the grassroots population poorer than poor. Prices of very basic commodities have sky rocketed to an extent that there is seldom enough to go round.
Most parents in Western Kenya are subsistence farmers, who grow only enough for consumption in their households, for lack of farms to plough. In cases where a little of the produce, mostly maize and beans could be spared to sell, the gains are very little, and are also consumed within just a day or two. This hand to mouth survival makes it so hard to educate girls in the family, who are mostly considered as silent observers and bystanders in the African context.

Kevogo Burton Tsisaga is not your regular preacher, as besides being a man of the cloth, he is a Teachers Service Commission Tutor, and the Sabatia Area Education Officer with 52 primary, 2 private registered, and 16 secondary schools under his jurisdiction.
“Most schools enroll more girls than boys in primary schools, a cycle that significantly changes in secondary school, where boys’ enrolment exceeds the girls. This is due to cultural interference, where most parents believe that boys form the pillar of the family, which simply means that whatever opportunity presents itself, they automatically get the first priority in terms of consideration for access of the same,” he says.

Access to clean and safe drinking water also interferes with education for girls whose duty it is to walk long distances to fetch just a few liters. This means that time that should have been utilized for studying is lost in the huge domestic workload that is only reserved for girls.
Teenage pregnancies and early marriage also play a vital role in ensuring that quite a number of girls drop out of school before joining high school. In most of these cases, the girls are usually HIV/AIDS orphans under care of grand parents or guardians, who don’t really regret not taking them to high school. Instead they encourage the girls to get married to men as old as their grand fathers in exchange for dowry, usually a few heads of cattle and some little money.

Flavin Afandi, a 16 year old form 2 student believes girls are more capable in handling matters education, social, development and economic than their brothers, and utilize their education, regardless of the level attained. For instance, a girl educated up to high school level and on to some kind of college makes the most out of the opportunity and in most cases ensures that she secures a job, after which she takes on the task of taking care of everything and everyone in her family.
“I am working hard in my studies, to surpass my mother, who only got the chance to get a primary school education,” she says.

The Kenya Constitution, which was promulgated in August 2010, has a clause that insists on no more than 2/3rds of members of elective public bodies be of the same gender. This is a plus in fighting discrimination against women, which has spilled over in Burton’s bursary allocation office.
In as much as bursaries are provided to the needy but bright students in society, more boys than girls apply for the same, although girls are the ones who benefit more. For instance, in the just concluded May 2013 allocation and disbursement, only 248 boys against 319 girls benefited from the bursaries. This was occasioned by a directive from the government, that every year, there be a special allocation for girls. It however goes without saying that if the allocation was not forth coming, then the ratio of boys to girls in the allocation of the same would have been way much higher.

Another challenge that befalls the bursary application system is the shyness exhibited by girls. Most needy boys see nothing wrong with hand delivering their filled application forms to the bursary office, while it is almost alien for girls to reciprocate; they’d rather send a proxy! This means that it is not always that the application forms for the bursaries, filled by girls, reach the bursary office to be allocated for funds. The society needs to work towards killing the inferiority complex that plagues the girl child. To counter this, the government has employed a system which ensures that officers from the bursary office visit girls’ schools physically and supervise the filling of the said application forms, a system that is almost stopping the feeling of inferiority in its tracks!

Politics was not left out as in the just concluded General Elections, a higher bursary allocation ratio for girls against boys was used as a gimmick during the campaign period as a crowd puller and to garner votes for aspirants, which paved the way for the above numbers.
To get workable solutions to what ails education for girls in Western Kenya, the local and national governments need to put measures in place to ensure equity access to education by killing negative cultures that belittle the girl child and women in society. Perpetrators of the same should also be prosecuted in a court of law.

Esther Memba, a 62 year old illiterate mother of 11, 6 girls and 5 boys lives with her 75 year old husband and extended family in Gagiremba village about 400 kilometers from the capital. She is not too keen about educating girls and would do anything in her power to defend her stance.
“The real reason I will forever be against educated women is because they would always think all my ways are backward, and would never be afraid to criticize the manner in which I do things,” she explains.

According to Community Education Service Canada, an organization that provides access to education for orphans and other HIV/AIDS affected children living in Kenya, the masses should be given civic education to guard against the discrimination of girls by promotion of their rights in order to increase community awareness of her needs and potential. A campaign to change the negative attitude towards girls by society can be achieved by employing role models, mentors and motivational speakers in the persons of people that the girls can emulate. Parents and guardians should not be left out of the education process, on the importance of providing equal opportunity to children of either sex. Those biased towards boys should be handled in a manner firm enough for them to realize the seriousness of ensuring equal opportunity for all their children, regardless of their sex, and especially extolling the values of educating girls. School environments that are girl-friendly would be a boost to lobbying and advocacy, especially so if they include a provision of sanitary towels and other toiletries for girls, in gender friendly toilets.

Best of all, the girls should first have a burning passion to get an education, focus on this desire and fight to attain it. When all is said and done, girls like Jane and Flavin, together with many others they represent, will be on their way to emancipation from the slavery that is illiteracy. To grow into women of substance, girls need to work harder in school and outside and be focused, as nothing comes on a platter of gold.

This article is part of a writing assignment for Voices of Our Future a program of World Pulse that provides rigorous digital media and citizen journalism training for grassroots women leaders. World Pulse lifts and unites the voices of women from some of the most unheard regions of the world.

Downloads

Comments

Sarah Whitten-Grigsby's picture

Excellent, Phionah!

Dear Phionah,

You have presented this 'case' with great strength and professionalism. My heart bleeds for the "Janes" of Kenya, and all the more so when you describe their inferiority complexes, engendered by their society.

Your description of, " . . . the slavery that is illiteracy," is magnificent, and so true!

These precious souls -- the future of Kenya! -- must become empowered through education and strong encouragement. May the world hear that and all who can reach out to provide support!

The information you have given us, so eloquently, in this piece, must be shared with all those who can help to give these girls with the education they so sorely deserve!

Respectfully,

Sarah

Sarah Whitten-Grigsby

Phionah Musumba's picture

Hopeful

Dear Sarah,
Thank you so much for taking the time to read and comment on my post. I echo your sentiments through and through, that the players in the education sector wake up and smell the coffee.
Meanwhile, at the Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, we will continue pitching in where we can.
All the best,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

pelamutunzi's picture

hope in education

the only true hope for girls is in eduaction. we have to create conducive environments to help the girls. all the best for you and hoping for more education for girls and empowerment

we may be powerless to stop an injustice but let there never be a time we fail to protest.
regards
pela

Phionah Musumba's picture

Unwavering passion

I agree with you completely. Education is power. Even so, the said girls should have a burningly unwavering passion for the same, in order to appreciate their empowerment.
All the best,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

TinaN's picture

Sad

I feel very sad for Jane.you know i remember when i was in primary school and this male teacher kept calling me to his office (which was in the work shop) and it was always dark in there,he was always talking bout how intelligent i was .Then one day,i read a novel in which a girl got raped and my eyes were opened-i never went to his office again.a couple of times he punished me for not going to his office fortunately,we got a new teacher and i never saw him again.
So these things happen and unless somebody warns the girls especially in the rural areas where there is no exposure at least some of us used to read novels.

Phionah Musumba's picture

Knowledge is Power

Hey, TinaN,
I agree with you that more needs to be done in creating and spreading awareness on the need to read widely, especially at the grassroots. If only Jane had had the opportunity.....
Even so, such empowerment should start in the home, the parents and or guardians need to be enlightened on the importance of creating a reading culture in their homes, for their offspring and charges to emulate.
All the best,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Y's picture

You have certainly used

You have certainly used quotes effectively. I was especially impressed with this quote, “The real reason I will forever be against educated women is because they would always think all my ways are backward, and would never be afraid to criticize the manner in which I do things,” she explains.

The selfish fear of our older generations losing their sense of control is not only a problem in your country's attempting change. It is epidemic in the United States, and I suspect, in all of humanity. Too many refuse to live in a manner that prepares their children for exceeding their own achievements.

Blessings on your work to illuminate this issue.
Yvette

Yvette

Phionah Musumba's picture

Unfounded Fear

I would like to think that the older generation is safer in the hands of educated youth.
Thanks for your positively encouraging words.
All the best,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Y's picture

This can only be the case

This can only be the case when the educated youth are aware and willing to face the many years of ancestral suffering that brought them to the places they hold in society. Sadly, I often find that the shame and fear of the old is avoided by the young, so the old are warehoused out of the way instead of being honored.

Yvette

Phionah Musumba's picture

I concur

I totally agree with you that the youth should be sensitized and awareness created about the needs and care of senior citizens. Infact, it should even be a course to be taught in class!
Thank you.

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Y's picture

I agree that aging with

I agree that aging with dignity should be taught as part of health education to all. The aged should also be taught how to let go of the reins of control once their children are adults.

Yvette

Phionah Musumba's picture

Exactly

Which should translate into a symbiotic relationship in terms of studies, that the aged learn to let go, as the young learn how to embrace their seniors' transition to old age.

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Y's picture

So well said, Phionah! Mutual

So well said, Phionah! Mutual respect is sorely lacking in all of our differences throughout the world.

Yvette

Phionah Musumba's picture

Bull's Eye!

This should be the point at which all our efforts convene then; making sure that senior citizens and the youth are empowered to respect each other for their mutual well being.

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Y's picture

This should be our goal and

This should be our goal and is our challenge. Until we can have the people in the same families sit down and work through their needs, desires, and differences respectfully and amicably, will we ever succeed on the world stage?

Sadly, my own grandchildren believe that anything they wish to learn can be learned from their peers and watching YouTube. At 62, I have become irrelevant to my formerly most intimate people. We should think about the adage, "A prophet is without honor in his (her?) own home."

I believe the prophets were simply keen observers of human nature and behavior, predicting the future by observing the past. This should not be seen a a manual for going forward. Humans are said to have a certain something special, what I call "The Sacred Spirit" and may be the source of our "free will" to make changes in the paths that are inspired by our animal natures.

May The Sacred Spirit be manifested on earth as it is in heaven.

Blessings to you.
Yvette

Yvette

Phionah Musumba's picture

Amen

Let it be so.
Abundant blessings your way too,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Phionah Musumba's picture

Exactly

Which should translate into a symbiotic relationship in terms of studies for both, in that as the aged are taught to let go, the youth learn to embrace their seniors' transition into old age.

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Greengirl's picture

Admirable Advocate!

Phionah, I admire your commitment towards promoting girls' education in Kenya, of course the world stands to benefit too.. I also like the idea of 'employing role models, mentors and motivational speakers in the persons of people that the girls can emulate'. Such people have a way of making the ride towards attaining a set goal(s) pretty easy!

You are an embodiment of those three traits: role model, mentor and motivator; and Kenyan girls' are blessed to have an admirable advocate like you, who relentlessly champions their cause.

Nice article!
Greengirl

Phionah Musumba's picture

Thankyou!

As always, Greengirl, you leave me lost for words. Its true that if we harness the power in you, him, her and I, we will be able to defeat the monster that is illiteracy.
Thanks again.
Lots of love,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Zoepiliafas's picture

Question

First, thank you for taking the time to provide your perspective on education and barriers that exist in Kenya.

I do have a question regarding the quote from the older woman who was against educating girls. She is quoted as saying, “The real reason I will forever be against educated women is because they would always think all my ways are backward, and would never be afraid to criticize the manner in which I do things,”

Why do you think she might hold this opinion and do you think there are many women like her that hold the same viewpoints?

What can be done to change their mindsets?

Regards,

Zoe

Zoe Piliafas

Voices of Our Future Community Manager
World Pulse

Phionah Musumba's picture

Displacement

If I were to use Esther Memba's own words,
“In every corner of the world, the girl is headed to a much better future than the boy, reason being that the girl learns how to take care of herself, to fight her own battles, much earlier in their life. It also goes without saying that girls are more caring for their personal effects while in and out of school, than the boys. That is why I encourage parents to at least ensure their daughters get the most basic education, to be able to read the bible in church, and even read messages on their phones, which everyone seems to have these days. Higher education is only suitable for boys, who girls with the qualities I listed above will attract enough to marry and take care of them and their children. My son’s wife, if too educated will not take care of me, but will despise my person. I need someone I can control in my home. I can’t allow just about anyone to come into my family and change the rules. My mother was so proud of me. I gave birth to eleven children, five boys and six girls, educating the boys to at least second year secondary school, and the girls to class six and eight, primary school, whichever they preferred. My daughters have since gotten married and are all as fruitful as I was! The real reason I will forever be against educated women is because my youngest son, who defied my advice and finished secondary school also dealt me the heaviest blow in my life by marrying an educated woman who thinks all my ways are backward, and is never afraid to criticize the manner in which I do things,” she explains.
There are countless women who think like her in my community and i think yonder.
This mindset can only be broken by empowering women with a sound education. I hope this answers you well.
Thanks a lot.
All the best,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Lehner's picture

Dear Phionah, I am very

Dear Phionah,

I am very impressed by your thorough research and nuanced understanding of issues that Jane and so many young girls experience in school. I commend you in your articulate sharing of the devastating reality of girls in schools.

Thank You!

Monica Lehner

Phionah Musumba's picture

Thankyou!

Hi Lehner,
Thanks a lot for your kind words. I believe we have to create great awareness on what our girls are going through, not only in my community, but the world over.
All the best,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Maura Bogue's picture

Skillful

You weave together personal stories and facts about the issue skillfully. Great work seeking balance among your sources by including a quote from one the people skeptical toward the education of girls. In the future, remember to make clear which words are your opinions and which are the words of the Community Education Service Canada.

Phionah Musumba's picture

Insightful

Thanks a lot for your words of wisdom. I will sure keep that in mind in my subsequent write ups.
All the best,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Y's picture

What are the chances of

What are the chances of offering vulnerable girls implantable, long-lasting conception control devices so that they cannot become pregnant against their wills and before their bodies are ready for childbearing?

Also, how available is access to the internet for your center?

Yvette

Phionah Musumba's picture

A great Idea

I agree with you that prevention is better than cure. Even so, my worry is that these are usually underage girls, and the law in my country prohibits use of contraceptives on minors.
As for young adult women students, the Centre empowers then with that information under our Women's health program.
Access to the internet is not an issue, the problem is a lack of computers. Network hitches are our main concern when it comes to internet reception.
All the best,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Y's picture

Do you have access to the

Do you have access to the morning after pill? What does your government do when a minor is impregnated? Do you have statutory rape laws? Do you have child support laws? Do you have laws that hold the parents responsible for the crimes of their minor children? Until what age are children considered minors? Is the use of contraceptives on minors prohibited even if it is done with parental or guardian's consent?

I believe that you have indicated that you are educating both boys and girls at your center. How do you handle dating and sexual issues between students?

I know I'm focusing a great deal on the issue of sexuality. This is because I know firsthand how the belief that becoming married and/or sexually active and a parent makes one an adult in the eyes of many in society. I also know that there are few who will help you achieve an education once you are burdened with the immense responsibilities of having your own children, especially if you have children with illness or disabilities. I see the situation of poverty to be hopeless as long as women are helpless to protect themselves from procreation until they have their own individual power and committed community networks.

On the subject of the internet, I have been so empowered by the ability to study and brainstorm with the advent of the internet that I believe it to be the most empowering tool in all the earth. I know that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is assisting with computers and internet connectivity in U.S. libraries. There are so many technology billionaires that may be able to help in African countries to support the notion that knowledge is power. For them, supporting efforts to connect all the corners of the earth expands the markets for their products. I am a big believer in promoting enlightened self-interest rather than asking for charity.

Do you have any big name entertainers or business titans in your board of directors or in your speakers' bureau?

Yvette

Phionah Musumba's picture

The morning after pill is

The morning after pill is available over the counter for anyone who can afford it. The law stipulates that when a minor is impregnated, the man faces a 7 year jail term. Even so, the society stipulates that the man takes responsibility, by marrying the minor or agreeing to raise the baby after birth. For statutory rape, the man serves a 14 year jail term. We have child support laws which work for the moneyed. The poor get into an arrangement of sorts between the father and mother. Minor criminals are charged in juvenile courts and if possible taken to approved schools, which are correctional centers, to serve their jail terms.
Here one is considered a minor until they clock 18 years. In this day and age, it doesn't matter if the use of contraceptives on minors is against the law, most enlightened parents are encouraging their minors to use them.
At the Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, dating and sex between our beneficiaries is strictly prohibited, not because of the laws that govern the country, but the law of our land, our community. In this community, everyone is related to everyone else by virtue of marriage, blood or clansman-ship. This means that encouraging sex here is next to encouraging incest.
At the Centre, apart from empowering girls with an education, we also empower women with skills to be self reliant, which translates to having the power with which to assert their position on important matters in their households.
I agree with you about the power of the internet, but sadly, its still a preserve of a few here. For instance, at The Centre, we only have one desktop computer and my laptop, which we all congregate around and learn about what's happening in the rest of the world.
You are a great teacher, Y. So hoping to meet you as a mentor/volunteer/peer educator at our Centre.
Wishing you the very best,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Ito Ako's picture

jambo dada

ni mimi akonkwa ,wa osodi congo, nashungulika kwa kazi ya wamama waliojehuriwa, pia na wa toto yatima, sasa habari ya nairobi , nawapenda saana ,pia utukumbuke
wako akonkwa

AKONKWA

Phionah Musumba's picture

Asante!

Ni furaha ilioje kwa wapendwa kujumuika pamoja katika ulingo huu wa kutetea maslahi ya wanyonge, haswa wanawake na watoto.
Sitowasahau, tuko pamoja kwenye vita hivi.
Nakutakia makuu na fanaka,

Phionah Musumba
Founder/Executive Director
Malkia Foundation &
Centre for Disadvantaged Girls, Kenya
P.O Box 9461 - 00300,
Nairobi, Kenya
Facebook: Phionah Musumba
Twitter: @KenyaGals
LinkedIn: Phionah Musumba
Skype: phionah.anguzuzu.musumba

Magazine »

Read global coverage through women's eyes

Inside Congo's Growing Sisterhood

Inside Congo's Growing Sisterhood

Community »

Connect with women on the ground worldwide

PAKISTAN: They Went to School and Never Came Back

PAKISTAN: They Went to School and Never Came Back

Campaigns »

Be heard at influential forums

WWW: Women Weave the Web

WWW: Women Weave the Web

Programs »

Help us train women citizen journalists

World Pulse Voices of Our Future

World Pulse Voices of Our Future

Blog »

Read the latest from World Pulse headquarters

Announcing Our Prize Winners!

Announcing Our Prize Winners!

Partners »

Join forces with our wide network of partners

Nobel Women's Initiative

Nobel Women's Initiative