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Disabled, But Able

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The below poem is my first English poem which considering Dari Poem's rules and principles I have written it.

It is common almost in all the countries all over the world that the children with disabilities are generally left behind. It is a true story and the boy in the poem is now a computer engineer for a large company. It is true the hero of my poem is not a girl, but for sure if there was a girl in such situation there is still a hope for her to learn and grow. :)

Disabled, But Able

It was spring, and he was ready for the first day of school,
As he asked of his mother, “Do I look cool?”

He put on a pair of thick glasses, took his books and a pad,
kissed his mom and then said “Bye” to his dad.

On that first day of school, he had no friends—
the lessons were difficult, so hard to comprehend.

This schoolwork is so very hard, he thought;
I must try to understand what the teacher has taught.

So he stood up with a stammer and said, “Maaay I saay something?”
The impatient teacher replied, “It’s best to say nothing.

“After the lesson ends, I will let anyone speak,
ask his questions and give a critique.”

The boy wanted to speak, he wanted to shout,
but he knew if he did, he might be sent out.

The lecture was over, and he had learned nothing,
So, he stood and said slowly again, “May I say something?

“My dear teacher, I could understand all your words,
but if I was closer, I could see the writing on the board.

I’d love to take note of the things you say,
but would you please go slowly with what you say?”

The teacher was shocked: “Why are you speaking up so late?
You could have told me, it wasn’t good to wait.

We can change some rules to help you succeed;
just tell me whatever it is that you need.”

His tears fell down, as he took the boy’s hand,
led him to the board, and told him to stand,

then took the white chalk and wrote beautiful words,
words that shone clearly on the black board:

Disability is not a good thing, and you all should know,
he may be disabled, but not unable, and he will soon grow.

He wrote on the board: “You have such bright eyes;
it’s good they cannot see how evil lies.”

He went on to say: “You have a kind heart,
so what if you stammer, and say words far apart?

“It is our fault that we do not go slow,
so you can understand, enjoy, and grow.”

He told the students to copy down the words,
all of the words that he wrote on the board.

“It isn’t enough to have sharp eyes,
you have to be kind, and not tell lies;

sharp ears alone are not a good thing,
a kind heart is needed to teach you something.

He has the kind heart, he has the interest;
he will be someone and will do his best.

You have to work hard, you have to be wise,
that is how you will reach to the skies.”

By Sudaba

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