Community Update

World Pulse Toolkits Available!

At World Pulse, we recognize the need for ongoing learning—for you and for your community! Our toolkits are all available here.

We are especially excited to share our signature Citizen Journalism and Digital Empowerment Curriculum. Start learning today!

Violence Faite aux femmes congolaises (ma vie propre)

Née en 198 en 1991 j'avais commencé l'école primaire mais ma grand paternelle était venu chez nous elle s'est imposée que je laisse les études et partir avec elle parce-que elle disait que ma ne me soigne pas bien parce-que j'étais d'une petite taille.Ma mère avait refusée mais ma grand était catégorique.Mon père m'avait demandé mon avis à cet age ne connaissant point l'importance des études j'avais acceptée de partir avec ma grand.
Arriver au village 3joirs après je commençais à pleurer pour rentrer chez nous.Ma grand et son mari avait refusaient.J'avais comme travail puiser de l'eau chaque jour et plusieurs fois alors que le trajet était long et c'était les montagnes.
Mes parents étaient loin ne savaient pas mon évolution dans des lettres on le trompaient que ma santé va très bien.
J'avais encore beaucoup megris et rempli de chiques.
1an après mon père était venu me rendre visite il avait tonné en voyant ma santé et parce que on m'avaient fait abandonné les études et ce jour que j'étais rentée chez nous.
En 1996 la guerre à commencée à Bukavu nous étions parti au village abandonnée encore les études en fuyant.
En 1998 mon avait dit que ma famille rentre encore au village à cause de répétition de guerre et nous somme restés longtemps au village parce-que mon père et ma mère avaient perdu leurs gagnes pains à cause de cette guerre.
Une grande sœur qui n'était directe avait proposait à mes parents que je part avec elle en ville ma mère m'avait suppliée de partir car elle était comptent car en ville je vais continuer mes études.
Quand j'étais chez cette grande sœur j'étais comme une esclave, loin de mes parents
Elle m'ait obligé de me réveiller chaque jour à 2heures ou 3heures du matin, pour faire tout les travaux domestiques avant de partir à l'école le matin et elle m'injuriait très fort et très mal et tout les visiteurs qui passaient chez elle, elle rencontrait des mauvaises histoires mes concernant et toutes ses histoires étaient fausses.Partout ou elle passait elle parlait de moi et son mari me tapait très fort, il mentait même que je suis voleuse. Cette vie était plus que difficile.
Ma mère était tombé malade là au village mon l'a amené en ville pour le soin médicaux mon père m'avait dit de supporter tout ce que je traverse parce que seulement j'étudiais. Il l'avait déjà un petit travail mais à cause de ma mère maladive qu' elle était mon papa ne savait pas bien s'organisait car ce lui même qui prenait les soins médicaux de sa chérie.
Après 4 ans j'étais rentrée chez nous et ma mère était en bonne santé.
Merci beaucoup.

English translation by PulseWire member ngalula

VIOLENCE ON CONGOLESE WOMEN, MY STORY
In the year 1991 I started attending the primary school. Soon after my grandmother from my father side came home and forced me to leave the studies and go with her because she said that I wasn’t taking enough care of myself because I was rather small. My mother had refused but my grandma was very stubborn. My father asked me what I wanted to do but at my age I didn’t know the importance of education, so I accepted to go with my grandmother.
After three days in the town, I started crying because I wanted to go home. But my grandma and her husband didn’t want me to. I also had a job; I had to take water every day from very far away on the mountains.
My parents were away from me and did not anything about my life because in the letters they received they were lying about my health.
In the meanwhile I lost lots of weight and was weak.
After one year my father came to visit me. He thundered when he saw my health status and since I had also dropped out of school that very day we went back home.
In 1996 when the war started in Bukavu we left the village and I had to drop out of school again to run away.
In 1998 I was told that my family had to go to the village because of the repetition of the war. We stayed in the village for a long time because my father and my mother had lost their breadwin because of this war.
At some point a distant elder sister proposed to my parents that I went with her in the city. My mother begged me to leave because in town I would have had the chance to continue my studies.
When I was in this elder sister I was like a slave, and away from my parents.
She had forced me to wake up every day at two or three in the morning to do all the household tasks before going to school in the morning. She used to curse loudly and very badly and all visitors who passed to her place and the ones she encountered were telling false bad stories about me. Wherever she went she talked about me and her husband hit me hard, he used to say I’m a thief. He was lying. That life was more than difficult.
In the meanwhile, my mother was sick in the village and was brought to the city for medical care. My father told me to bear all that I was going through only because I was studying. He had a small job, but because of my unhealthy mother my dad could not well organized his life since he himself was giving his darling medical attention.
After four years I came back home and my mother was in good health.
Thank you very much.

This story was written for World Pulse’s Ending Violence Against Women Digital Action Campaign.

World Pulse believes that women's stories, recommendations, and collective rising leadership can—and will—bring an end to gender-based violence. The EVAW Campaign elicits powerful content from women on the ground, strengthens their confidence as vocal grassroots leaders, and ensures that influencers and powerful institutions hear their stories.
Learn more »

Comments

PCR's picture

thanks

God bless you my sister

thanks

Faida

Kusinza Ntebwa Espérance's picture

Remercièment

Merci beaucoup d'avoir pensée à moi tout les jours, bisou au bébé lemuel.

God will pay you one day.

ngalula's picture

TRANSLATION

VIOLENCE ON CONGOLESE WOMEN, MY STORY
In the year 1991 I started attending the primary school. Soon after my grandmother from my father side came home and forced me to leave the studies and go with her because she said that I wasn’t taking enough care of myself because I was rather small. My mother had refused but my grandma was very stubborn. My father asked me what I wanted to do but at my age I didn’t know the importance of education, so I accepted to go with my grandmother.
After three days in the town, I started crying because I wanted to go home. But my grandma and her husband didn’t want me to. I also had a job; I had to take water every day from very far away on the mountains.
My parents were away from me and did not anything about my life because in the letters they received they were lying about my health.
In the meanwhile I lost lots of weight and was weak.
After one year my father came to visit me. He thundered when he saw my health status and since I had also dropped out of school that very day we went back home.
In 1996 when the war started in Bukavu we left the village and I had to drop out of school again to run away.
In 1998 I was told that my family had to go to the village because of the repetition of the war. We stayed in the village for a long time because my father and my mother had lost their breadwin because of this war.
At some point a distant elder sister proposed to my parents that I went with her in the city. My mother begged me to leave because in town I would have had the chance to continue my studies.
When I was in this elder sister I was like a slave, and away from my parents.
She had forced me to wake up every day at two or three in the morning to do all the household tasks before going to school in the morning. She used to curse loudly and very badly and all visitors who passed to her place and the ones she encountered were telling false bad stories about me. Wherever she went she talked about me and her husband hit me hard, he used to say I’m a thief. He was lying. That life was more than difficult.
In the meanwhile, my mother was sick in the village and was brought to the city for medical care. My father told me to bear all that I was going through only because I was studying. He had a small job, but because of my unhealthy mother my dad could not well organized his life since he himself was giving his darling medical attention.
After four years I came back home and my mother was in good health.
Thank you very much.

:: Beatrice Ngalula Kabutakapua
:: Foreign Correspondent || Researcher
:: Blog: www.balobeshayi.com
:: Skype: beka.trixie
:: Twitter: @Kabutakapua

Leslie Stoupas's picture

You are a role model!

It must have been very frustrating to have such struggles with some of your family members and your own health as a result. However, it is very inspiring what you have endured so that you could get your education. You are a great role model for women everywhere who struggle with this challenge because I know you will make it matter! You already are making it matter. Thank you so much for sharing your story!

Leslie Stoupas

Thank you for sharing your story and the many hardships you faced with such courage, strength and humanity. Despite the injustices and hardships, your beautiful spirit shines through. I am deeply touched by your passion to pursue your education while facing such challenges.

I am so glad to hear you are now back with your family and your mother is in good health. Keep faith in yourself as an INTELLIGENT, BEAUTIFUL, BRAVE and AMAZING Woman.

I encourage you to continue to write, share stories and empower other women to do the same. There is power in numbers and building a support group of women is valuable. Love to hear what you are doing now and your dreams.

Keep up the good work!

Linda Ando

With Gratitude,

Linda M. Ando

Dear Kusinza,
What should I say, God bless you dear. With immense strength, boldness and absolute tenacity you have pursued the journey of your life towards get education and supported your parents. You know what 'education' is like light. It erases the cobwebs of ignorance and gives us enlightenment. Every conscious parent wish their children to be educated. When you went through a long struggle of tolerating the abuse of your grand parents and your distant sisters, as you know your mom and dad must have cried in their heart. But they tolerated it just as your father said you needed to study and he was taking care of your mom. I know, it must be extremely hard what you have gone through. But you know what, you did a great job! I am so touched. You are a role model. You proved that "hard work and steadfastness has no substitute". Congratulations on your achievement. I am happy that you and your family gave importance to education and despite odd situations strived for education. I remember a quote:
"The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure , the process is its own reward. By Amelia Earhart"
and
"The truth is that all of us attain the greatest success and happiness possible in this life whenever we use our native capacities to their greatest extent."
You are an inspiration for all of us.
I will end my comments with a line by the famous poet Khalil Gibran, I often remember it to get inspiration:
“The deeper that sorrow carves into your being,the more joy you can contain.
Is not the cup that holds your wine the very cup that was burned in the potter's oven?
And is not the lute that soothes your spirit, the very wood that was hollowed with knives?"

Keep going. God is with you and all of us are with you.
Lots of love
Nusrat

Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved. ..........Hellen Keller

Anita Muhanguzi's picture

Be strong

Dear Kuzinza,
How are you doing now. I a so sorry for what you have been going through and i strongly encourage you to continue with your education so that you change your life one day in future. What class are you in now. Please keep us updated on the situation in your life so that we know how best to advice you. Always pray and seek guidance from God and be strong. May the Almighty God give your strength in every thing that you do and may he guide you each day at a time. God bless you and be strong.

Mrs. Anita Kiddu Muhanguzi
Head of Legal and Advocacy
Centre for Batwa Minorities
a.kiddu@gmail.com
cfmlegal@gmail.com
Skype: mrs_muhanguzi

Gbemi Abeow's picture

Don't Give Up!

Dear Kusinza, I know that hardship isn't pleasurable but the good thing is that it makes a person stronger. It makes it possible for you to see the world differently and to understand your place in it. More importantly, it has helped you find a voice, with which you can tell us your story. Now I see you as a woman who through all the frustrating attempts at denying you a fundamental right - education - continuously tries to rise above the odds. Keep on being strong Kusinza, do not give up!

Your Truly,

Gbemisola Abiola

Magazine »

Read global coverage through women's eyes

Letters to a Better World

Letters to a Better World

Campaigns »

Be heard at influential forums

WWW: Women Weave the Web

WWW: Women Weave the Web

Programs »

Help us train women citizen journalists

World Pulse Voices of Our Future

World Pulse Voices of Our Future

Blog »

Read the latest from World Pulse headquarters

World Pulse Launches our Inaugural Community Advisory Board!

World Pulse Launches our Inaugural Community Advisory Board!

Partners »

Join forces with our wide network of partners

Nobel Women's Initiative

Nobel Women's Initiative