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An Issue About Adipositivity

Foto of Adipositivity

What is the real problem with fat women? Many people, in different sizes, will say that the problem of being overweight is health. But actually it is not. Because health, besides from being a public policy and a right, is a condition that belongs to the private sphere of people. Each person is responsible for their own caring and the concept of "care" itself is broad and particular; it is based on an act, consciously or not, by free decision. It would not disturb others publicly.

The real problem with fat women is the social judgment. Noone is mocked, rejected for a job or sexually by smoking. Blondes don't have to carry the burden of third opinion, they're beautiful just because; nobody says, "Go to dye your hair, here we just have accesories for brunettes". When a person, arrogating a right that has not, makes a judgment about your weight or texture, almost never does thinking about your health, but as a stereotype shims on what is acceptable and beautiful or not.

Beauty is a social construction, but especially is a personal one: Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and who should define it, is the person that is reflected in the mirror, that is, each of us. However, if there is anything that enslaves us, is precisely the "other's eye". As Fatima Mernissi says: "The size 38 is the Western Women's Burka". The beauty is varied and I don't like we need to theorize about it, because just as we are willing to recognize and protect the difference of opinions, races, religions, nationalities and cultures, we should also do so by the diversity of sizes.

Even if we like it or not, women are the brunt of the mandates on the beauty, size and behavior. If we struggle to free ourselves of patriarchy, we must begin to release our flesh. I do not accept either the friendly compassion that say: " Fat women ALSO are cute" or "Chubby women can ALSO be sexy, smart, loved, accepted." Sorry, that mercy is as humiliating as an insult, because who expresses it, does it assuming the underlaying idea a fat or chubby woman is a poor soul in distress, locked in an even more miserable body.

That's why projects like "Adipositivity" are so innovative and necessary. Because it returns the power of acceptance on the body, exactly where it belongs: Each person, in this case, every woman. The initiative aims to promote size acceptance without being based on an external assessment, through the photographs in which visually the physicality of fatness is presented directly.

The hope is to widen definitions of physical beauty. Literally.

The photographs here are sometimes close details of the fat female form, often without the inclusion of faces. One reason for this is to coax observers into imagining they're looking at the fat women in their own lives, ideally then accepting them as having aesthetic appeal which, for better or worse, often translates into more complete forms of acceptance.

The women you see in these images are educators, executives, mothers, musicians, professionals, performers, artists, activists, clerks, and writers. They are perhaps even the women you've clucked at on the subway, rolled your eyes at in the market, or joked about with your friends.

This is what they look like with their clothes off. Some are showing you their bodies proudly. Others timidly. And some quite reluctantly. But they all share a determination in altering commonly accepted notions of a narrow and specific beauty ideal.

Bookmark adipositivity.com and check back often, as new photographs are added regularly(ish). And please help spread the message. The Adipositivity Project: Changing attitudes about the aesthetic validity of big women, one fat fanny at a time.

Adipositivity: http://www.adipositivity.com/

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Comments

MaDube's picture

I like it when you say we

I like it when you say we should ignore beauty as a social construction and find the beauty within ourselves, defining it for ourselves. That is so true and so necessary for many of us as we often look down upon ourselves based on what we perceive others think about us-I am not pretty enough, my hips are not wide enough, my nose not straight enough, my hair not long enough-ENOUGH FOR WHO??? If it's enough for me then that must be the end of the story. Liking your post dear.

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