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Educating Women Instead of Pursuing Warfare

Many Afghan youths around the world are trying hard for bringing about change in Afghanistan. Suddenly, these glittering minded Afghans’ hopes are vanished just by arriving in Afghanistan. They find themselves only few.

An Afghan photograph hesitates of taking picture of a woman with her Burqa and sick baby on the street. A painter cannot dare to use the colors on the beauty of a woman’s veil. The veiled woman might afraid of being drawn with her veil by the colors.
A writer might want to bring a war-torn mother’s story into words, but she rejects for the fear of sharing her story with the world. Thus, the writer might forget words for explaining the value of her voice because she does not give value to her voice.
A woman might walk on the street of Kabul city, and cannot help the woman on the street being stoning by some unknown men or women. But she remains calm because she is a woman. People might stone her as well just for helping another woman.

These barriers for change are because Afghan people are so much busy with their present lives for rebuilding their cracked houses after decades of severe wars. They are so much devastated with the gloomy memories of wars that they do not want to go back to those miseries by sharing them with others. Afghan people do not have time to think about future, hope, and joy. We want to speak out for giving them hope and way of thinking about happiness back as we can see the deep-depression in their heart through their eyes and voices and temper on women.
The one solution for bringing change is empowering Afghans around the world to wash the world’s mind about the stereotypes on Afghan women, Burqa, Islam, and culture. We want the world to hear from Afghan women that they need education for distinguishing between moral and immoral values in this culture.
The Pulsewire and other online communities have started giving Afghan women voice. They write and share stories with other women for a stronger voice without fear. I would never dare to go outside my home in Kabul for interviewing women. I see these women suffering, bearing, and shivering under the thunder of fear of their husbands or in-laws. I have kept their voices and stories alive with my words in my writings in WorldPulse.
And I again want to say that,
These women under Burqa do not feel suppressed because they have forgotten living without wearing wired-eyed-Hijab. The wind of freedom does not yet whispered into their ears, and they have not yet felt the drops of rain granting them the joy of living. Most of these women are afraid of freedom. By collected-voices from around the world, we will educate all of the Afghan women to define Freedom and then have the option to have their Burqa on our out. Just we need education from ‘the world of peace,’ not activism against Burqa, or weapons, or troops.

Comments

Stella Paul's picture

On a different note

Dear Parwana

Lovely post! On a slightly different note (but related to the Burqa issue), I have a number of my friends in India who wear the Burqa and are living life to the fullest. In fact, one of my colleagues in Greenpeace was a girl who wore the Hijab and she was the head of the 'action' department - those daredevils of Greenpeace who climb 60ft high chimney of thermal power plants and swim in the arctic sea to stop Japanese whale killer ships. And she was and is a walking tornado of liveliness, laughter and a million jokes. Knowing her closely has made me believe that its wrong to think that just because a woman is wearing Burqa means she is oppressed. On the other hand, it is indeed a challenge to see all women living a life, exploring all their potential as my Greenpeace colleague did.

I wish you all the success in your work!

Stella Paul
Twitter: @stellasglobe

parwana fayyaz's picture

Dear Friend:

Thank you so much for your comment, just wanted to share another heart breaking story about Iranian Female Football Team. I heard from one of my Iranian friends that the coming Olympic of 2012 in London has rejected the Iranian female footaball team from playing just because of their headscarf. As a woman, I do not agree with this, a woman's hope should not be stepped down, for being a woman and wearing Hijab.
It is very nice to hear from you about your colleagues.
Thanks,
Bests Parwana

MaDube's picture

Post conflict rehabilitation

Dear Parwana

I was touched by your words especially when you said 'These barriers for change are because Afghan people are so much busy with their present lives for rebuilding their cracked houses after decades of severe wars. They are so much devastated with the gloomy memories of wars that they do not want to go back to those miseries by sharing them with others.'

I get the sense that what Afghanistanis need is support and counselling to come to terms with what you all suffered. It has been proven that talking about one's experiences helps to deal with the trauma and that will be the first step to being healed and finding peace in one's heart. I hope efforts are underway to help in this way and I am glad already your story has helped me to realise this. I hope others who read your story and can influence decision making processes will pick out this need in the reconstruction and rehabilitation of Afghanistan post-conflict.

Best,
MaDube

parwana fayyaz's picture

Dear Friend:

Thanks for your comment. I think, this time we need the others' help by providing us a space for pursuing our education and knowledge. We want them to keep their promises on pursuing the Afghan women, men, and children's education. We will build Afghanistan by ourselves.. Bests,Parwana

usha kc's picture

Dear Parwana, so touching

Dear Parwana, so touching article, thank you for it.

parwana fayyaz's picture

Dear Friend:

Thanks for your comment, I love your words, live and let live. bests, Parwana

YAOtieno's picture

Voice for the voiceless

Thanks for sharing the stories of other women who cant using Web 2.0

Women are more than the covering on their heads! Nasreema has written a very beautiful piece on the subject. Hope you will read it!

Keep writing

Y

A candle looses nothing my lighting another

parwana fayyaz's picture

Thanks dear Friend:

Thanks for your comment and telling about Nasreema's piece, I will love to read. Every woman has unique voice for saying something, everyone is so special by their own voices. Bests, Parwana Fayyaz

AchiengNas's picture

Great article Parwana!

I appreciate your courage, standing out for the silent women voices in Afghan and more so thinking along education than wars and weapons. Education adds a lot of value in life. May your leaders change their minds and attitude towards women by promoting their education.
Thank you so much for sharing this, hoping to read more of your stories.

Beatrice

Uganda

I believe everybody has the potential to live a better life. Given the Opportunity, Education and Motivation ANYONE can become someone admirable. Nobody is a NOBODY, everybody is SOMEBODY.

parwana fayyaz's picture

Thanks dear Friend:

Wars and blood-shedding have been part of Afghan people's history for three decades. Everyone suffers from war, even the nature of a country. My 'leaders' need time to understand the value of women's education rather than women themselves. And I know that it will take a little long time. But for now, the world leaders also should change their minds and attitudes toward women rather than "War on Terror."
Thanks for your comment.
Bests, Parwana

Adepeju's picture

women should be educated

women should be educated instead of pursuing warfare...I agree with you. Women must stop been seen as weaklings by the larger society. The fact is without women, there is no world. Keep fighting for the oppressed Afgan women, Parwana, let the world know there is power behind the veil!

parwana fayyaz's picture

Dear Friend:

I will never consider Afghan women as 'oppressed Afghan women,' they have no power to act, since the nation is busy with the destruction of three decades-wars.
There is no chance for women to come ahead of nation and negotiate with those, who cause war in Afghanistan. We just need an act, which will open ways for us to talk and solve problems in Afghanistan and the world.
Thanks
Bests Parwana

Adepeju's picture

I see your point but the word

I see your point but the word "oppressed" wasn't meant to be offensive. The truth is that whether or not you have the power to negotiate, the fact that you can't freely hold your head high to save other women on the street being stoned, you can't paint in the pictures of a woman and you are not given an opportunity to be heard without a fight seem to me as injustice to Afgan women which is equal to an oppression of their voices. I admire your courage to fight and your positivity. Well done!

parwana fayyaz's picture

I got your point;

Thanks for your response, yes, you are right that the word 'oppressed' does not mean to be offensive, but it is not a sufficient word too, for being prefix to Afghan women's name. I want the world to hear that women of this region do not consider themselves 'oppressed,' so why should the world consider them. We need to empower women because they have the rights too, not because they have been 'opressed.' If we lose the part of our positivity, we will be lost..
I hope my points are convincing..
Bests Parwana

love2write's picture

what a beautiful piece -

what a beautiful piece - thank you.

Ellen Rosner Feig
Assistant Professor, Composition and Literature
Carl Wilkens Fellow, Genocide Intervention Network/Save Darfur

parwana fayyaz's picture

Dear Friend,

A piece is beautiful when the message is effective. But I do not know what you like the most about it.
Bests, Parwana Fayyaz

Nezed's picture

Good message. We shall pursue

Good message. We shall pursue peace

I do not aim for Perfection; Just excellence!

parwana fayyaz's picture

Dear Friend:

When the aim is excellence then it is just perfect. Bests, Parwana

fem4femmes's picture

Visualizing Freedom...

Dearest Parwana-

It is your ability and daring in creating full-color images in my head that is so amazingly beautiful! There is so much that we do not see and therefore do not know about the lives of women around the globe. Thank you for helping me to see the world of Afghan women, that I may better support your voice!

I lend my spirit and my strength to your vision for genuine freedom for women in Afghanistan, may they be given the education they need to be the nourishing agents of change that your people need!

Much color and freedom to you today!

marissa

"I am the flicker, flame, butterfly ablaze who wants to fly in search of mythical rainbows beyond the rain." ~ Ana Castillo

parwana fayyaz's picture

Dear Friend:

Thanks for your words, it is amazing that you have also included a quote on 'butterfly.' Can I know the reason?
Bests. Parwana

Meena Afghan's picture

Dear Parwana,

Dear Parwana,
I do not think so that Hijab is the main problem of Afghan women because most of them happy in it expect a few community women, they have problem in getting their basic right and in decision making.....

Peace Seeker,

parwana fayyaz's picture

Dear Friend:

Dearest Friend,
I think, you did not get my point deeply. I am not taking Hijab as main problem of Afghan women, but the world's main problem as Afghan women's Burqa. So, thanks for your comment. Bests, Parwana Fayyaz

Meena Afghan's picture

Sorry Farzana Jan now I got

Sorry Farzana Jan now I got your point clrearly, by the way why should the world would has problem with Hijab, every human has freedom in living so clothing as well lies within it, the world must not has any problem in Hijab because it relates to person freedom in clothing. it realy does not sound well too for the world who declared human rights.

Peace Seeker,

Mila's picture

Comments on Week 3

Hi Parwana,

Thank your for sharing your story of challenges and solutions. I like that you describe the challenges with such words that you really visualize it. Also, empowering the women is a great solution. I would suggest ending your writing with a conclusion that summarizes and/or ties back to your beginning .

Best,

Mila

parwana fayyaz's picture

Hi Mila:

I think, your comment is one of the best comments of my posts. You have given me a good suggestion on my writing. I really admire it. I will consider your view on my next writings.
Thanks,
Bests,
Parwana Fayyaz

atwahirwa's picture

Sharing stories

Parwana:

Your point about share stories between Afghan women with their fellows across the globe for a stronger voice without fear is relevant...Promoting tolerance and respect for all while maintaining a sense of hope in people is much more needed in a long war-ravaged country..This can be achieved through interconnecting through social networks such as Pulse Wire... Thanks again for sharing this experience...Best Aimable

AIMABLE TWAHIRWA

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