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The Hose

My Story Standing Up
It took me fifteen years of hard work to be able to build a home for my family.
My four children, now grown up, were quite proud of their early widowed Mom to be able to present them with what they can call ‘our house’.
They all wanted to contribute something valuable and succeeded to a great extent. The latest accessory was a hedge outside the wall to give a pleasant front view of the house, and to make it easy to give directions to those who want to visit.
What else do you need mama?
A hose, a long hose that can go around the house is all I need now.
The hose came.
Shshshshshshshshs…
Who is it? Silence!
Next morning: shshshshshshshsh…
Who is there? Silence!
The water leak from the hose continued for weeks. Then it stopped miraculously until the incident was forgotten and started all of a sudden one very early morning after the hose was placed in the usual place to water the hedge.
And again the shshshsh sound left only the water splash all over the corner where no one from the house can see unless they come out. It happens too early for any neighbor to be outside to see.
It was an exceptionally hot summer day when the door bell rang. I went out to answer the door.
A tall dark slim man, obviously from Southern Sudan, stood there smiling timidly while three seven to eleven years old boys hid behind him.
Salam Aleikum madam, these boys want to thank you because we are going.
Thank me for what? I haven’t seen them before.
No, but they seen you. The teacher scolded them one day and said if they don’t wash in the morning he wouldn’t let them into the class. They stopped going to school. You see, we have no water where we live in that unfinished building. I saw the hose one morning and told them to pass by and wash before they go to school. I thought you knew.
I never thought a hose is so valuable!
No I didn’t but I am pleased they did. Let them come whenever they want and I will leave the tap on.
Ah, madam, they are sending us to the South today. Goodbye madam.
I lost a bit of my heart, irretrievable!
asha

Comments

mdorton's picture

Beautiful story

Thank you for sharing this story - so moving. It breaks my heart, too. - Megan

amikijera's picture

Nice

You never know when you are being of service. I bet those boys will remember you and your hose forever!!!

asha's picture

Beautiful story

And an extra beautiful response mdorton!
Thank you for reading me so quick it warms my heart.
Stay Well.

asha

asha's picture

Nice

Thanks amikijera.
I wish they do! I will never forget them and their father's smiling face.
I keep asking myself: Is water handier where they moved them; the new country: South Sudan?

asha

Jan K Askin's picture

Dear Amikijera, I am so

Dear Amikijera,

I am so touched by this story. The implication is that our actions can give untold benefits to strangers if we open our hearts and minds to generosity. You did so and enabled three impressionable young boys to attend school.

May a hose be our metaphor for a generous spirit.

Your sister,

Jan

Jan Askin

Jan K Askin's picture

Dear Asha

Dearest Asha,

Forgive me for typing the incorrect name in the post above.

Jan

Jan Askin

asha's picture

Genorous Hose!

Never mind Jan,
Yes Jan, a hose may dry and and go, but hearts wetted with this type of love are always quenching thirst of the needy. May our hearts be always wet and giving to those in need.

Thank you for the warmth in your encouraging words.
Love
asha

asha

Frances Faulkner's picture

Intention

Asha,

Such a lovely voice you have. The father and boys showed a wonderful sense of appreciation, and you offered a gracious response, with a little bit of fate as the connector. Your intentions to make the world a better place are spreading beyond your walls now that your children have grown.

Frances

asha's picture

A critic's Analysis!

Salam Frances,
I love what you wrote and have taken it as a positive analytic view. I felt happy for 'intentions' going through.
Regards

asha

sallysmithr's picture

Great Story

Your story truly helps to remind us not to take things for granted and that it's the little things that count! Thanks so much for sharing!

Sally Smith

asha's picture

Welcome strong Sally

It is not strange that a woman with your strong will to beat an 'unbeatable' alien in her life recognizes the little things
that count. I am grateful for your presence here and wish you all the success in your endeavor to help those who
need your experiences.
Thanks Sally.

asha

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