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I Will Go Where You Will Never Find Me…

Violence against women is “never acceptable, never excusable, never tolerable.” The UN Secretary-General

March 8, 2011 marked the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day (IWD). Since 1911 when the day was first celebrated in Russia, many milestones have marked the gains made since the women’s movement started. This year, I joined other women from around the world to celebrate the day in Mombasa at the Kwetu Training Center, where a Women’s Listening event had been organized by a partnership of women from Australia, Canada, Kenya and Britain. The Women’s Listening Event was a time to listen to the stories and experiences of women in the face of struggles against poverty, disease, violence, drug and alcohol abuse, and illiteracy.

When I returned to my village after three very inspiring and empowering days, I discovered that a neighbor had killed herself because she was tired of frequent beatings form her husband. She had run away from him many times, but every time she left, after a couple of months, he would send elders to go for her; she would go back because ‘a woman never says no to elders.’ Every time she went back, she would hope that this time around, her husband had changed for real. The last time she came back and her husband beat her to near-death, she said to him, “I will go where you will never find me.” She took poison and she died.

Last weekend, I attended a Youth Peace training that International Peace Initiatives convened for youth from all over Kenya. I heard unbelievable, heart-wrenching stories, like the following: Martina (not real name) was married and realized that her husband was cheating on her. She refused to sleep with her husband, who did not deny having a girlfriend because, as she put it, “she did not want to get HIV-infected.” Her husband went out and came with four men who gang raped her in her house as her husband watched. He said to her “you refused me so that you do not get AIDS. I have brought you people who will give it to you.” Martina did not know that if she went to the hospital within 72 hours she might have been saved from contracting the disease. Today she is HIV-positive and, with the help of some lawyers, is seeking help to initiate legal action against her husband.

These two cases took place in Kenya in 2011. Not in the 1780s or 1890s – in 2011, present-day Kenya. In 2011 Kenya, a husband can bring a gang of men who are HIV infected to gang rape his wife because she refuses to sleep with him due to his infidelity. In 2011, a woman commits suicide because of a violent husband. And in 2011, Kenya took part in nationally celebrating 100 years of International Women’s Day. We have made progress because in the 1990s we never celebrated this day as a nation.

Today, Kenya has created what has been called a progressive constitution that supports women’s rights and offers space for women to claim an equal playing ground with men for leadership positions. Article 27 (8) of the new constitution for example, guarantees women at least a third of all public appointments. In addition, the constitution clearly points out seats in parliament that must be filled by women. On another front, Kenya is a signatory of the United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325 of 2000 in support of women’s rights, in addition to many UN and African Union women’s human rights documents. Kenya is currently preparing a National Action Plan to implement UNSCR 1325, which requires governments to include women in decision-making positions and involve them in peacebuilding processes in their nations.

In spite of Kenya’s new women-friendly constitution and these international, continental and local documents, many women in this country do not know their rights and have no idea where to go for help when their rights are violated. That is why my neighbor committed suicide by taking herself where her husband could no longer reach her. If there was a place where she could go for shelter and advice, she may be alive today.

Martina, on the other hand, discovered an organization that connected her with a legal advisor. However, for her, it was too late: she had already contracted HIV from the gang her husband brought to her house to rape her. If she had known she could be treated within 72 hours of that rape, she may be HIV-negative today. At least in her case she has a lawyer who is helping prosecute her husband and the rapists; I pray she succeeds!!

According to the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Violence Against Women (CEDAW), domestic violence is “any act that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivations of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life… violence against women that shall be understood to encompass, but not limited to, physical, sexual and psychological violence occurring in the family, the community, including battery, sexual abuse of female children, dowry-related violence, marital rape, female genital mutilation and other traditional practices harmful to women, non-spousal violence, violence related to exploitation, sexual harassment and intimidation at work, in educational institutions and elsewhere, trafficking in women, forced prostitution, and violence against women perpetrated and condoned by the state.”

Worldwide, discrimination and violence against women are common. That is why in 1946, seventeen women who were among the delegates at the founding meetings of the United Nations in San Francisco met and decided that the rights of women were not being given the priority they deserved. They helped establish a UN Commission on Human Rights, and pushed to establish a full Commission on the Status of Women. The UN Commission on Human Rights (UNCHR) had its first meeting in January 1947, and the UN Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW) had its first meeting in February 1947.

Although insufficiently funded and having no secretariat or centre of its own, the UNCSW nevertheless placed women’s rights firmly on the agenda of the United Nations. Since then, many more international and regional protocols and agreements have been made and signed to further ground nation’s commitment to ending violence against women globally.

The historic UN World Conference on Human Rights was held in Vienna in 1993. In 1991, women held worldwide hearings on violations of women’s human rights and collected more than 500,000 signatures demanding that women’s human-rights issues (particularly violence against women) be placed on the UNCHR conference agenda and not merely discussed by a small group during sessions of the UN Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW). Women called for a Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women, and demanded a tribunal on crimes against women. The resulting Vienna Declaration put violations of women’s human rights on the world’s agenda, setting a global stage for action.

Kenya and Tanzania are two African countries which have taken proactive action on this issue. In the 1980s, the issue of violence against women was becoming a national disgrace in Tanzania. A group of women met to discuss and take action on this growing problem. They decided to take a multifaceted plan of action. They circulated information on the rights of women throughout the country. They showed how violations of women’s rights damaged the very fabric of their society. Men as well as women were educated on the rights of women and made to understand that violence was not an answer to problems within the home, or anywhere else. At the same time, the government was lobbied to pass legislation to give women protection against violence. Safe houses and places of refuge were established, where women could escape with or without their children.

The Tanzania Media Women’s Association (TAMWA) was formed, with a special mission to address the question of violence against women. Today, TAMWA has a regular newsletter, a resource centre, a crisis centre, and a refuge centre. Laws have been passed strengthening women’s rights, and female lawyers have joined the effort to put an end to gender-based violence.

In Kenya, some progress has been made in ensuring that violence against women is understood and effectively addressed. The Federation of Women Lawyers of Kenya (FIDA-K) carried out a study on domestic violence in Kenya titled ‘Gender Based Domestic Violence in Kenya: A study of the Coast, Nairobi, Nyanza and Western Kenya Provinces of Kenya’ in 2007. The study reveals that gender based violence and intimate partner violence is increasing: 74.5 per cent of people interviewed in the Coast, Nairobi, Nyanza and Western Provinces indicated that they had been physically abused within their homestead. Findings of a 2008/2009 Kenya Health and Demographic Survey (DHS) revealed that 39 per cent of women reported being physically or sexually assaulted by their husbands or partners during their lifetime.

Human rights-based and gender-aware approaches to peace, development, conflict and security highlight that concepts like development and peace must be embedded in the lived experiences of people. For example, the absence of armed conflict does not necessarily mean the end of violence. It is important to promote an inclusive peace and human security for women and men, girls and boys, around the world. In Kenya, this means securing governmental commitment to recognizing various ways violence is meted out to women, and to eradicating all forms of violence against women and children. In addition, strategies must be established for providing information to help women in distress, especially in rural areas. Critical is the understanding that for effective interventions to fight violence against women and children, women MUST be included in all peace and security decision making processes.

Kenyan women are largely excluded from most Kenyan peace and security decision-making processes, despite their enormous potential to contribute to their success and sustainability. Women’s and children’s issues and concerns are not adequately addressed in Kenya’s reform agenda and policy documents. Differential implications of reforms and policies are not fully understood or considered, thus giving lip service to actions that would mainstrean gender and women’s human rights in Kenya’s reform agenda and policies. Unless women are recognized as equal participants in all decision making mechanisms as well as peace and security initiatives in Kenya, there will never be inclusive peace and security for everyone in the nation – especially for women like Martina and my neighbour who committed suicide. This exclusion results in leaving out significant voices of women leading to marginalization that continues to make the search for sustainable peace and stable communities in Kenya elusive.

The inadequate representation of women and women's concerns in Kenya has been explained away by weak excuses framed within tough cultural terms, to maintain the status quo. Obstacles to women's inclusion include patriarchy, which is embedded in local culture and socialization processes; additionally, women are assumed to lack formal expertise or be unrepresentative of all local women. These allegations are mere excuses to keep women from participating in decision-making processes, and yet many women have been so conditioned to see themselves as third-class citizens that they cannot see the possibility of overcoming these cultural and societal barriers. There is critical need for capacity building – for women to raise their voices and increase their participation in conflict prevention, leadership, development and other peace and security processes within the framework of UNSCR 1325.

UN Security Council Resolution 1325 underlines the important role women play in prevention, response and resolution of conflicts, peace negotiations, peacebuilding, peacekeeping, humanitarian response and in post conflict reconstruction. It also emphasizes the importance of women’s equal participation and full involvement in all efforts for the maintenance and promotion of peace and security. Kenya is a signatory of UNSCR 1325 and is laudably in the processes of creating a UNSCR 1325 National Action Plan (NAP). This process requires concerted effort from stakeholders including government institutions, civil society, development partners and higher learning institutions, leading to establishment of a National Steering Committee. This Committee will provide guidance to strengthen coordination of actions towards implementation of the UNSCR1325. Adopting a NAP on UNSCR 1325, thus domesticating it in Kenya, will be a great stride taken towards creating possibilities for inclusion of the significant voices of women in all peace and security decision making processes in the country. This will light the path to sustainable peace and nonviolent stable communities in Kenya.

Every society desires sustainable peace. Sustainable peace in Kenya cannot be attained without protecting women and children from violence, and including them in decision-making processes. Sustainable peace is only viable when the perspectives, needs and concerns of all stakeholders are voiced. The unequal and inadequate representation of women in peace and security processes is unacceptable. As long as women continue to suffer horrendous experiences like those of my neighbor and Martina, Kenya will remain a nation in gendered chains chocking the life out of sustainable peace.

Some organizations, like International Peace Initiatives (IPI: www.ipeacei.org), are taking the lead in ensuring women’s voices continue to rise and to be heard. IPI promotes human rights for women and children in the context of HIV/AIDS, poverty and violence; gender equality; and women’s full and equal participation in decision making in all positions of governance, peace processes, post-conflict reconstruction and the reform of security institutions. Through workshops, seminars and information/experience sharing forums, women come together to empower each other and transform their lives. Women are recognized as active participants in conflict, peace-builders, political actors, activists and proactive agents of social transformation. Rather than portraying all women as helpless victims of violence, the diversity of roles they play in the perpetuation of conflict, as well as agents of change in conflict prevention, resolution and transformation, peacekeeping and peacebuilding are addressed. Women are not victims of violence; rather, they are active transformation agents for peace. Women bring perspectives that help balance and bring wholeness to situations that affect people within families and in communities. Viewed in this light, it is not difficult to see that their exclusion from decision making is a regrettable loss for any family, community and country. IPI works to help raise the voices of women and highlight the important work women do for peace, security and development in Kenya.

IPI is a key player in the ongoing process of creating Kenya’s UNSCR 1325 National Action Plan. The NAP will go a long way in mainstreaming inclusive peace and security for women in Kenya, ensuring that women are included in all peace, security and development decision processes of the land; and more importantly, that their voice is heard and their views presented. To this end, IPI hopes to set up a radio program on gender-based violence, safe homes for battered women and a rescue/information center in Meru.

In 2011, violence against women CANNOT be acceptable, is NOT excusable, and should NOT be tolerated!! My neighbor went where no one could bother her ever again. Martina now lives with the HIV/AIDS virus. In 2011, no woman, anywhere in the world, should suffer such terrible experiences again.

This article is part of a writing assignment for Voices of Our Future, which is providing rigorous web 2.0 and new media training for 30 emerging women leaders. We are speaking out for social change from some of the most unheard regions of the world.

Comments

Rachael Maddock-Hughes's picture

Powerful

Dear Karambu,

I learned so much by reading your article,and was deeply touched by the stories of the women in your community that you shared. Your article is a call to action for everyone to do more to combat violence against women. The high numbers in your country of women affected by violence are quite scary, but they make me wonder what these statistics are in the US and Europe as well. Thank you for opening my eyes and talking about some of the solutions that are currently being undertaken. I am sure that IPI will be instrumental in creating change!

Keep up the great work,

Rachael

"In every human heart there are a few passions that last a lifetime. They're with us from the moment we're born, and nothing can dilute their intensity." Rob Brezny

Amani K's picture

Thank YOU

Thank you Rachael. these levels are very scaring for me as is the rate of rape for young girls. Yesterday a young girl was gang raped by her classmates - the boys were arrested but released on Bail - so they are out and at large - you can imagine what that means for the girl. By the way as they were raping her, one of the boys was videotaping with his mobile phone - i think there may be a porn market for these things because last year there were similar incidents in USA and South Africa.

Truly there is a loose nut in our society that needs urgent fixing!!

I guess, there is a lot of work to do around here!!

Thank you for providing a space where we can share our voices.

Love and Light,

Karambu

Dr. Karambu Ringera
Founder and President, International Peace Initiatives
Vice President, Global Ecovillages Network (GEN) Africa
Advisory Board Member, Women Human Rights Institute, University of Toronto
Member and Delegate, Soroptimist Internationa

Iffat Gill's picture

Dear Karambu, Really touched

Dear Karambu,

Really touched by your piece..."I will go where you will never find me..." Sad to read about the situation of women in a place across the world from my country and yet it sounds so similar and familiar. Hope the new legislations introduced in an effort to combat violence against women have a lasting impact.

Best.

Iffat Gill

Amani K's picture

Thank you!!

Thank you MariposaAsia for your comment. I think we will have to work hard to have the new constitution/legislation implemented - but it is good that we have them in place in the first place.

AmaniK

Dr. Karambu Ringera
Founder and President, International Peace Initiatives
Vice President, Global Ecovillages Network (GEN) Africa
Advisory Board Member, Women Human Rights Institute, University of Toronto
Member and Delegate, Soroptimist Internationa

Mola's picture

Beautiful, with strength and depth

You have done an amazing job of taking striking individual stories and weaving them into the broader framework of national and international realities. I was deeply touched by the stories of your neighbor and 'Martina'. These stories truly reflect not only the deep pain experienced by these women, but represent the stories of women all over the world. Your presentation of these stories within their broader context is beautifully done. I am personally touched and feel a greater understanding of the need to bring international goals to the local level.

Thank you so much for your writing. It is clear and powerful. I wish you and IPI the best of luck in your fight to end violence, especially violence against women.

morgan

Amani K's picture

Thank YOU

Thank you Morgan!!!

All the best to you too, in all you do!!

AmaniK

Dr. Karambu Ringera
Founder and President, International Peace Initiatives
Vice President, Global Ecovillages Network (GEN) Africa
Advisory Board Member, Women Human Rights Institute, University of Toronto
Member and Delegate, Soroptimist Internationa

pawani_rasmus's picture

hi karambu your article is

hi karambu your article is very inspiring! thank you for this great article!
i would like to take some advice...im 17 and my friend's friend who is also in my school is going through a hard time at home...they beat her, dont give her any freedom and she works all day long in her house like some sort of slave...how do i help her?? the thing is i have never spoken to her before and i dont know how to approach her or whether she will accept my help what should i do? there is another case of a girl who is beaten by her parents often very mercilessly.. she also showed me the scars on here arms once that her father had given her because she reached home late after a carnival. i really want to help these girls but i have no clue what to do . they have spoken to some teachers about this but i dont think that anything has been seriously done regarding this issue....please give me some advice!

thank you
pawani
india

Dear Pawani-Rasmus,

Sorry for taking time to respond to your request. I have not forgotten - i am going to send you a response soon.

Thank you for asking - when we ask for help, it expands our horizons - for the one asking and for the one responding. Thank you for trusting me with this very important need - i will respond in the next couple of days. Please bear with me.

You are such a wonderful friend to your friends and you feel for them. That is great - to open your heart to the needs of others. We are in this together - let us uphold each other in the Light and Love of God/Goddess/Spirit always - and our troubles will shift!!!

Love and Light,

Karambu

Dr. Karambu Ringera
Founder and President, International Peace Initiatives
Vice President, Global Ecovillages Network (GEN) Africa
Advisory Board Member, Women Human Rights Institute, University of Toronto
Member and Delegate, Soroptimist Internationa

Amani K's picture

A Response for your Friend

Hi Pawani,

I hear your pain and your sense of hopelessness. But I am here to encourage you and tell you that there is HOPE because each one of us actually is the hope we are looking for!! Let me explain.

I do not pretend to understand the context of your situation. No matter, I KNOW any situation can be changed and the main agent of that change is you. You asked for help. And I want to tell you that there is no easy answer but one thing I KNOW is that you can find your voice and agency.

One way I have worked with myself and my work is to ask these questions:
1. What is the future I want to see?
2, What is stopping me from getting there?
3. What do I need to do to get there?

You have to deeply look at these questions and answer them truthfully for yourself. How badly do you need change? Do you realize that it is you who needs to change, not you change these people’s behavior? I am not saying what they are doing, beating you, is right - it is wrong and something needs to be done about it. Let me suggest some ways you could bring change.

Imagine you are a garden (your life is a garden). Using the idea of a garden, we need to plant seeds, these seeds need to be watered, and when they grow, the plants need to be watered, weed for them, put manure, ETC. Going with this idea of the garden, I want to invite you to listen to me carefully – that is read this carefully, listening to what you are telling yourself in your mind and heart.

In the garden, water the seeds, not the weeds. That means: Look at the positive in your life, not the negative. Focus on possibilities (your dream), not the problems. What you think in your mind is what creates your reality. Your mind has the potential to change your destiny – I mean, what you think, has the potential to change your destiny. What is your vision? Really deeply, think of what you want to attain in life – what is your DREAM, your VISION for your life? If it is to complete school, then you must think about what you need to do so you stay with your parents peacefully. Do not do what other students are doing - their parents are different from yours. If your parents do not want you to come back home late, probably they are concerned for your safety - talk with them when you need to go somewhere and agree on a time when you will be back - and KEEP that time. Show then you respect them. On the other hand, look deeply at why your parents are beating you - is it without a reason, if so, for example when your father is drank he beats you and other family members, then you need to ask for help from someone trusted by the family - for intervention. If that fails and your life is in danger (example - beatings increase or rape), then you have to look for help from the authorities (children's agency, for example).

Right now you are focusing on your sadness, fears, insecurity, problems and setbacks. You are thinking about how these people are mistreating you. Right now you see yourself as a victim who is powerless, useless, helpless and hopeless. You are focusing on your hurt, anger and sadness. You are looking into problems not possibilities. YOU ARE WATERING WEEDS IN YOUR GARDEN!!! I invite you to move from these because they reinforce your victimhood, sadness and helplessness. Start thinking about your dream and vision for your life – because I know you have one – what is it? You need to start focusing on your vision, dream – and think about how to get there – look at possibilities, not problems!!!

Do you realize you have the choice of where to focus your thoughts? Stop feeling small and sorry for yourself. WATER YOUR SEEDS!! Focus on possibilities, not the problems you are facing now. If you can focus on problems, and it hurts, why not take the time and make use of your time creating your dream and working to making it come true – and feel happy you are creating something positive for your life? When in the space of creating your future, you will do all those chores they give you as you sing in your heart because you KNOW, you are working to change the circumstances of your life. REFUSE to see your life as 'this is how it will always be.' It will always be like this if you so wish. But it will change if you so wish – IT IS UP TO YOU!!!

SO, I WANT YOU TO CREATE A VISION (Goal/Dream) FOR WHAT YOU SEE AS POSSIBLE FOR YOUR LIFE. Do this right now, before reading on.

Do you believe you can change the circumstances of your life? I BELIEVE YOU CAN!!!

Look at what your passion is. Where do you feel most motivated and inspired in you life – in terms of what you want to do? What is it that you think of becoming and it brings a song to your heart even when someone is insulting you or making you do all the chores or ignoring you or saying all those negative things to you? You KNOW who you are and you KNOW you are not all those things they are saying to you. That is what they are saying – BUT WHO DO YOU SAY YOU ARE??

So ask yourself:
(i) Where am I now? Honestly assess the situation, taking in all the pain and recognizing what the real issues are. What can you do to change the situation?
(ii) Where do I want to go? What is your dream, vision for your life? Create a vision that is realistic and does not scare you – something you CAN and WILL do. Remember, life evolves as we grow from strength to strength and our lives change as we attain our vision and live our dreams.
(iii) What do I need to change to get there? Look for a new place to live? Say live with an aunt or other trusted relative?
(iv) What is my next growth step? (What is your next level intention?) For example: if you are experiencing violence at home – you may choose to say: I am an important person and I do many good things like I am obedient; I do my chores; I am a good student ETC and I choose not to be a victim. I will talk with my mother to help me stop this violence.

You have been so resilient so far. So strong. You can get to the next level of growth. Trust yourself and your inner voice. Look for someone to work with you, help you if you need such help (your mother, auntie or any other trusted adult) You are welcome to keep having these discussions with me too.

Lastly. Your core beliefs must be aligned to keep your vision and dream alive –the tools you need to fertilize your garden and keep the plants healthy and thriving.
1. self-responsibility
2. self-esteem
3. trust
4. positive attitudes
5. flowing with change

Believe you have the strength and power to make your life better – and with the help of God, you CAN DO IT!!! Remember you are NOT who these people say you are – you are an wonderfully created human being. You are beautiful and there are many things in you that make you strong. Your oppressors see these strengths, and want to kill them so that they can continue to exploit you. You KNOW you ARE not who they say you are. That is why it is important to name yourself and see who really ARE – w ho you SAY YOU ARE.

So, the source of your power – where you continue to look after your life (garden) to keep it healthy and strong: Be committed to attaining your vision; Be disciplined – you have already shown resilience in bearing all the abuse – use that resilience to attain your dreams. Love yourself and the ‘other’ even those who torment you – there is no powerful tool than love especially shown to those who mistreat us. It has to be real and offered sincerely. But you must also speak your need to be heard. Trust your inner guidance – when you listen to your inner voice, you will get the wisdom to speak as needed, with respect to those who mistreat you. You may also seek help from an organization that helps children in distress in your country. Finding your own truth and finding a support system are important to build on your own strengths.

I hope this will help your friend(s) find a solution to her challenge. They are free to ask questions and i am interested in knowing what they did to transform the circumstances of their lives.

With my prayers, always.

Karambu

Dr. Karambu Ringera
Founder and President, International Peace Initiatives
Vice President, Global Ecovillages Network (GEN) Africa
Advisory Board Member, Women Human Rights Institute, University of Toronto
Member and Delegate, Soroptimist Internationa

Daniela I's picture

This is a wonderful response

Thank you. We all benefit from reading these nurturing, supportive words..

This is exceptional! I could hear the anger in your words and you are rightly angry! I am angry too - how can things like this still be happening in 2011?! I know that they are also happening in Zimbabwe and I know that there is still such a long way to go with culture and social norms and standards...

Thank you for your wisdom and courage.

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

Amani K's picture

Thank you!!

Thank you for your comments Fungai. Great - let us keep speaking - thank God for our voices!!

AmaniK

Dr. Karambu Ringera
Founder and President, International Peace Initiatives
Vice President, Global Ecovillages Network (GEN) Africa
Advisory Board Member, Women Human Rights Institute, University of Toronto
Member and Delegate, Soroptimist Internationa

mrbeckbeck's picture

Inspirational leadership

You powerfully drew me in to this article, and kept me engaged throughout. The stories you tell are shocking, and hard to believe that they actually happened... but this is reality, cold and unfeeling. The need for women's leadership is obvious. With their voices included in national planning and peace-building, the future will be brighter!

Thank you for your work to break-down old stereotypes and social norms. Women will rise in Kenya, and show the world what is possible.

Great work!
Scott

Scott Beck
World Pulse Online Community Manager

Amani K's picture

Thank you Scott!!

Thank you Scott, for your comments.

The struggle continues!!

Peace.

Karambu

Dr. Karambu Ringera
Founder and President, International Peace Initiatives
Vice President, Global Ecovillages Network (GEN) Africa
Advisory Board Member, Women Human Rights Institute, University of Toronto
Member and Delegate, Soroptimist Internationa

Nancy J. Siegel's picture

Wow, you've done it again!

Dear Karambu,
You have meticulously crafted another powerful, moving and inspiring article! With your permission, I would like to circulate this among the women I know.
Love, Nancy

Nancy Siegel

Amani K's picture

Thank you Nancy!!

Hi Nancy,

Thank you for your comments. You are welcome to share the article with your friends!!

Love and Light,

Karambu

Dr. Karambu Ringera
Founder and President, International Peace Initiatives
Vice President, Global Ecovillages Network (GEN) Africa
Advisory Board Member, Women Human Rights Institute, University of Toronto
Member and Delegate, Soroptimist Internationa

SSD's picture

Asante sana! (thank you in swahili)

Dear Amani, this is brilliant! May your endeavours be met with success, always.
Long Live Amani !

In solidarity,
Shaheen Sultan Dhanji
monsuun_communications@yahoo.ca

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