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Zimbabwe: Rebuilding the house of stone

Zimbabwe's flag waving proudly during Independence Day celebrations

When music legend, Bob Marley, composed the song ‘Zimbabwe’, a rousing anthem for the newly democratic African nation, he could scarcely have guessed how its lyrics would one day yield bitter sarcasm and pain with every pluck and twang of the guitar strings that form its beat.

“I was in third grade when we got independence,” recalls Ngoni (not his real name), enthusiastically, upon hearing the lilting reggae song play. “It was so exciting for us as children and the adults were singing and dancing, and crying and chanting slogans. Then we got some paper caps with the colours of the Zimbabwe flag. Oh my God!”

In one of the verses of the song that celebrates Zimbabwe’s 1980 attainment of independence from British colonial rule, Marley sings, “No more internal power struggle/ We come together to overcome the little trouble.”

But just over 30 years later, those words stand in stark contrast to the present Zimbabwe situation where an intense power struggle plays out against social and economic decay and mass migration of Zimbabwean nationals to all parts of the world.

Zimbabwe is a land-locked country in southern Africa which touches borders with Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zambia. At the end of 2010, Zimbabwe’s population was estimated at just over 12 million. However, it is believed that there are over three million Zimbabweans living outside of the country due largely to the political tensions that have erupted over the years. Most recently, in 2008, the re-run of a highly contested presidential election between Zimbabwe’s two main political parties led to widespread violence and intimidation. But it is the forcible reclamation of white-owned farm land by Zimbabwe’s government in 2000 that will forever symbolise the rupture of the nation’s previously peaceful political environment.

Several farmers were killed, tortured and intimidated and it is estimated that the land reform process saw the transfer of nearly 8 million hectares of land (one-fifth of Zimbabwe’s total land mass) owned by about 4 000 white farmers to 160 000 mostly black households. Previously, white farmers controlled approximately 70% of all of Zimbabwe’s total arable land. At this time, white people constituted less than a tenth of Zimbabwe’s total population.

But what was meant to herald prosperity for the black majority has largely not borne fruit. Owing to the violent and unplanned manner in which the farm resettlements were carried out, there was and remains little to cheer about for many ordinary Zimbabweans. Nationwide food shortages caused by a shift from skilled large scale to semi-skilled small holder land farming, and exacerbated by erratic rainfall patterns, have led to a major decline in Zimbabwe’s food security levels. This has been accompanied by sky-high hyperinflation recorded at approximately 6.5 quindecillion novemdecillion percent by the end of 2008, widespread unemployment (calculated at over 80% of the adult population in 2009) and the shrinking of productive markets across all of Zimbabwe’s business sectors.

In short, these untenable living conditions experienced over the past decade have led to a mass exodus of Zimbabweans to various parts of the world. And Zimbabweans of every race and background have been affected.

Twenty-six-year-old Amy (not her real name) remembers well the reasons for her own family’s departure from Zimbabwe. “We left in December 2001 due to the economic situation in Zimbabwe,” she recalls. “My dad's business relied on foreign currency for him to be able to procure inventory; but getting forex in Zimbabwe at that time was challenging at first, and then it became illegal. My dad was not willing to do forex trades on the black market and risk getting arrested or worse, so he decided to move to South Africa.”

Amy’s situation is one lived out by many Zimbabwean families whose business enterprises folded in the early 2000s after the country’s supplies of foreign currency dwindled to a drop of the national need. During this time, the forex black market trade mushroomed with many illegal traders, nicknamed ‘bo’sphatheleni’ (a Ndebele term meaning ‘what have you got for us?’) supplying illegally sourced currencies to desperate Zimbabweans.

Amy eventually moved to Texas in the United States, where she studied, and now lives in Houston. “Initially, when I moved to the US in 2002, people would inevitably detect an accent and I would tell them I was from Zimbabwe,” she remembers. “But from the blank stares I got in response, I would have to add that Zimbabwe was a country in southern Africa. And then they would think I was from South Africa. Eventually, I just started saying I was South African as it was easier."

Over the last few years, Zimbabwe has enjoyed its fair share of international media attention – but all for the wrong reasons. Once termed the bread basket of southern Africa (owing to its previous food security role in SADC, southern Africa’s regional bloc) Zimbabwe is now often derisively referred to as the basket case of the region. Infinitely long food queues, nationwide shortages of water, outbreaks of cholera and politically charged murders and beatings are just a few of the causes of Zimbabwe’s tainted public image. But for many, Zimbabwe still remains an unknown land and concept that draws blank stares and confusion.

Amy’s situation is complicated further by her being a white Zimbabwean, a concept which she says many people have trouble understanding. “One thing that is frustrating for me is that people here do not really believe that I could truly be Zimbabwean, or even African for that matter,” she adds. “They almost always assume that my parents must have been missionaries or that I can't really be connected with the country.”

Given that Amy’s family history in southern Africa dates back at least five generations, she finds it insulting that her childhood experiences of struggle are somewhat discredited due to the colour of her skin

For 28-year-old Nontsi Mutiti, a black Zimbabwean also based in the US, her frustrations have been somewhat different. “I have experienced racism,” she states. “This [the US] is not my country and there is a history of oppression and prejudice that runs very deep here.”

To diffuse tensions, Nontsi says that she and her group of multicultural friends crack racial jokes among themselves. But she remains mindful of the fact that the school where she is studying provides her and her peers an “artificial” environment in which she is surrounded by people from various countries and parts of America. This, she feels, offers her protection from the social tensions playing themselves out beyond the parameters of their school.

No example depicts the social tension that Zimbabewans experience upon departure from their country better than the May 2008 xenophobic attacks that took place in South Africa. In that month alone, 62 foreigners were killed, 670 injured and 30 000 displaced after pockets of South African resisters to integration took to violently attacking migrant workers whom they felt were robbing them of jobs and sustainable livelihoods. It is estimated that there are about 1.5 million Zimbabweans living and working in South Africa.

Ruvimbo, a Zimbabwean working in South Africa, knows this tension all too well. Though the violent attacks flared - and continue to flare - within poorer communities, Ruvimbo says that she too has experienced discomfort in her middle-class Johannesburg environment. “I am often reminded that I am not welcome when I walk into a shop and the attendant asks me something in a language that I don’t understand. As soon as I answer in English, a look of fear and disgust registers and I realise that even though I am the same colour as the person, I am different.”

But with prospects of a brighter future for Zimbabwe still remaining an obscure fantasy, it seems that many Zimbabweans living abroad will have to continue to endure these challenges.

The signing of a political agreement in Zimbabwe, and the formation in 2009 of the government of national unity among Zimbabwe’s three feuding political parties, has marginally improved living conditions for the ordinary man and woman. Under a clause in the agreement that addresses economic recovery, the parties commit themselves to working together to address challenges around production, food security, poverty and unemployment.

Also, a three-year Short-Term Economic Recovery Program (STERP) is in place and is beginning to yield results which include the reduction and stabilisation of Zimbabwe’s inflation. Zimbabwe no longer uses Zimbabwean dollars as its currency and now relies on foreign currencies such as the United States dollar and the South African rand. Through this fiscal stabilisation, it is estimated that Zimbabwe’s economy grew by 4,5% in 2009 and was projected to expand by 8.1 % in 2010, and 9 % in 2011.

However, there are still many problems that require urgent attention. While HIV prevalence - currently standing at about 13% within the adult population - is on the decline, it still remains one of highest national HIV epidemic figures. In addition, poor remuneration of civil servants and the effects of the loss of skilled labour (due to AIDS, land reform and migration) are still being felt. And perhaps of most universal concern is the emerging rift among the three parties that constitute Zimbabwe’s coalition government, namely ZANU-PF, and the MDC parties, as rumours of imminent and violent elections continue to swirl.

“I do not wish to return to Zimbabwe as I feel my home is here now,” affirms Pratiksha Parmar (26) who is based in New Zealand. As with many other families, Pratiksha fled Zimbabwe in 2000 due to the political tension and uncertainty. She adds that she has adjusted well to her new country and is happy to be living in a place that guarantees her security and stability.

Nontsi, on the other hand, wishes to return, but remains of two minds. “I am not sure if I could maintain the standard of work I want to do if I move back permanently,” she shares. “Zimbabwe is a very insular society and I have not felt that I fit in well even before I left. Going home after being in a place where I can fully express myself may prove difficult especially when I have to interact with people who are very quick to judge anyone who does not conform to the standard expectations of Zimbabwean society.”

Amid all these negotiations of home, race, identity and belonging, what seems apparent is that there is need for organised support systems for Zimbabweans living abroad. While all of the women interviewed noted that they were members of Facebook-based networks of Zimbabweans living abroad, they felt that these were not useful for promoting meaningful interaction. Networks that encourage Zimbabwean women of the diaspora to share constructively their unique experiences of discrimination and longings for their home country could prove to yield solutions to many concerns.

An example of this is the Zimbabwe Women’s Network UK (ZIWNUK) which was set up in 2003 to focus on the issues concerning the rights and welfare of Zimbabwean women refugees, asylum seekers, students, migrant workers and their families living in London. The network also aims to implement projects that promote and nurture girls' and women’s skills so as to enable them to lift themselves out of poverty.

While efforts on the part of this journalist to make contact with the network were fruitless, it appears that the network has assisted women and their families to acclimatise to the new demands of their lives abroad; lives that breed a multitude of challenges and complexities.

In the music video for Bob Marley’s ‘Zimbabwe’ the crowds of people - young and old - dance, shout and scream euphorically as the Union Jack is lowered and Zimbabwe’s flag is hoisted flapping proudly against the night breeze. Prince Charles salutes the moment while other dignitaries stand at attention. This is Zimbabwe's new dawn.

Zimbabwe’s flag is symbolic and tells the nation’s story in vivid shades of colour. Red represents the blood shed in protracted wars of independence. Yellow represents Zimbabwe’s mineral wealth. Green symbolises agricultural fertility and black is for the attainment of majority rule by Zimbabwe’s black population. Amid this kaleidoscope of colours is the mythical Zimbabwean bird set against a red star and white triangle – a symbol of the peace and magic of a land whose name means ‘house of stone’; a house of shattering stones that needs rebuilding not only in Zimbabwe, but all across the diaspora.

This article is part of a writing assignment for Voices of Our Future, which is providing rigorous web 2.0 and new media training for 30 emerging women leaders. We are speaking out for social change from some of the most unheard regions of the world.

Zimbabwe's name is thought to derive from the great Zimbabwe kingdom, build from stacking stones in the 11th century
Cashless society: this pile of money was worth a mere 100 US dollars
Zimbabwean assylum seekers in the UK demanding reforms to policy around assylum seekers' workers' rights

Comments

Diana Mahachi Zimbabwean Woman Human Rights Activist's picture

Our mother country

I share with you the beauty of our country and my heart sinks when I read and hear news on a day to day basis of the current situation in Zimbabwe.
How much more damage do we need to see before something can be done to change this situation!!!!!!
Your article sort of took me back to the good old days!!!!!

As women we fight for our rights to live with dignity
Women of great power and wisdom.
A gracious woman retains honor (Proverbs 11 vs 16)

Fungai Machirori's picture

Thank you!

Thank you so much!

So much damage and it's going to take time to fix. But all things are possible!

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

warona's picture

Wow! BEAUTIFUL ZIMBABWE!!!!!!

Dear Fungai!

Congradulations on accomplishing your amazing piece my dear love. The very country we embarked alsmost for anything , you know i mean anything.Botswana is landlocked so it depends mostly on imported good, so Zim has been playing a good part for us. Our Mothers would go there for shopping and other important things. Zimbabwe used to be a destination for most of Batswana.Zimbabwe is a beautiful country though the rumours of the ZANU PF and MDC, the uncooperating parties in some way or the other. This tarnishes its good name, resulting in our fellow brothers suffering for no apperent reason. Well for the past years i have seen men and women from Zimbabwe pouring in Botswana in an amazing way.

It has been a hard time for this beautiful land.If you hear the stories at the boarder gates how innocent women are tracked and exploited, you would never want to hear that again. At least today the situation is Stabilising since the introduction of the power sharing system by Zanu pf and MDC. I just hope Zim recovers fully economically. By the grace of God as Nations continue to pray Zimbabwe will yield more amazing results, as it has already started.Our sisters will live in peace and they will enjoy their home land to the fullest without any worry and torture and despair!

With all my heart for Zimbabwe rise and shine forever!

All the best gal

Warona

"success will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time " And when confronted conquer with love

Fungai Machirori's picture

My neighbour!

Yes, I know what you mean. In 2008, we Zimbabweans were always in Botswana just buying basics. It's sad to think that we could note even find soap in our own shops... It's painful memories and some are still living like that. I pray that thinsg will get better soon because we really need peace. Thank you for your kind words :)

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

Ruth Beedle's picture

thank you

Fungai;

Thank you so much for sharing this story of your country and from your heart. I learned so much and want to know so much more. It has to be heart crushing to know that in 30 short years so much has changed to make people feel the need to leave their mother land and find places to live and work that will never, really, take the place of home.

And I have never, never heard the term 'quindecillion novemdecillion' and am now that much smarter. My God. Who knew this kind of thing could happen. I pray for stability and progress and hope to descend on your beautiful country and that your people will feel the pride of those independence ceremonies once again as they carry small clips of Zimbabwean currency in their pockets and purses that will pay for all their needs in the coming week.....

Thank you for your story and for your writing and for the clarity with which you share.

Love

R

Fungai Machirori's picture

Thank you!

Yes, that inflation was crazy. It is still painful to remember. Some people are still living that horrible life and that is even more painful. Collective suffering is somehow more comforting than the type we have now.

I am glad you learnt more about Zimbabwe and that you want to come and visit. This was my hope. I have a 10 trillion dollar note that I carry with me! Be blessed ALWAYS.

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

Ruth Beedle's picture

Being Blessed....

.....is much easier with friends like you and World Pulse.....

I want to see that note!

R

Ruth,

When I find it amid all my mess, you will be the first one to see it!

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

usha kc's picture

Dear Fungai, so pleased to

Dear Fungai, so pleased to read this. Thank you for sharing this. I knew more about your Country. Great story ,great writing.
keep going.

Fungai Machirori's picture

Thanks Usha!!!

I am glad it helped you to know my country better! :)

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

NatalieS's picture

House of Stone

You did a beautiful job on Module 4 assignment. So well written and shaped and so much personal as well as general information. I truly enjoyed reading your piece and learned so much from your approach. Loved the personal stories and the photos, and the Bob Marley references. Great Job.
Best to you.

NatalieS

Fungai Machirori's picture

Thanks you so much!

It wasn't easy to write this at all and I am glad that it had the intended impact :)

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

NatalieS's picture

Your piece

A skillful writer makes it seem as if it were easy. Congrats again.
I have given yr name to a last year's Correspondent. Ruth OLUTOSIN of Lagos Nigeria, because you two share a lot in common. Hope that you check her out on WP.

NatalieS

Fungai Machirori's picture

Thanks again!

I would love to explore the commonalities. Thank you for putting me in touch with her!

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

Kristin Miller's picture

EXCELLENT!

Fungai, I love this piece! Congratulations on a job very well done!

Perhaps most striking is your keen sensitivity to the questions of identity, race, home and belonging, faced by all those affected by the "social and economic decay and mass migration" of recent years in Zimbabwe. Thank you for bringing these issues to the forefront of our discourse and connecting them with a "face and name" through your interviewees.

You have certainly succeeded in *beautifully* exposing an important issue. Thank you so very much for sharing your voice in this way!

Cheers,

Kristin

Fungai Machirori's picture

Thanks Kristin!

I feel like this a discourse that has long been ignored. People always think Zimbabwe is one big mass of people whose struggles are all the same. But it isn't! I am glad that I know different kinds of Zimbabweans as it really helps to understand their issues better, and also to let the world know about them! Thank you for your high praise. I am very humbled.

Just like our flag is a multiplicity of colours, so are our people!

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

AchiengNas's picture

Great writing

Fungai,
You are a great writer! I have gotten the opportunity to know your great country through you.
Thanks to you, weldone and congratulations!!

I believe everybody has the potential to live a better life. Given the Opportunity, Education and Motivation ANYONE can become someone admirable. Nobody is a NOBODY, everybody is SOMEBODY.

Fungai Machirori's picture

Thanks Bea!

I am glad you learnt something new!!!! Hugs

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

jap21's picture

Hi Fungai

I love your piece! It is so insightful and clear.

I didn´t know there were so many similarities between what is happening in my country, Bolivia, and Zimbabwe.

I have a question. The political party in power, does it hold office by itself or is it a coalition? If so, which parties are in the coalition? do they all belong to the same wing?

Keep writing, you shine!

Love,

Jackie

Jacqueline Patiño FundActiva
Tarija - Bolivia
South America
www.jap21.wordpress.com

Fungai Machirori's picture

Thank you!

Jackie, thank you for taking the time to read... I will definitely read up on Bolivia now.

The government in power is a coalition government between the main political party, the ZANU-PF (which fought colonial rule), the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) which has unfortunately broken down into two separate parties known as the MDC-T and the MDC-M. But soon, they will dissolve the coalition government and new elections will be held so that there is only one party in power.

I hope that helps you.

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

jap21's picture

Thanks Fungai

I guess all these parties are from the left. Are they united in any way to the Socialism for the 21st Century movement?

Thanks for answering dear friend.

Love,

Jackie

Jacqueline Patiño FundActiva
Tarija - Bolivia
South America
www.jap21.wordpress.com

Fungai Machirori's picture

Just might be...

The ZANU-PF has its roots in socialism, so I wouldn't be surprised. The leaders in the party still refer to each other as Comrades and even when all the political upheaval happened, the justification was always that they were transferring wealth and power to the collective Zimbabwe...

The MDC is founded in the trade unionist tradition and is sometimes thought to be elitist as it has been sympathetic to white Zimbabwean's right. I am not so sure whether it espouses socialism also... but I will try to find out!

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

Amani K's picture

Great Piece

Hi Fungai,

Thanks for sharing your country with us. It is a beautiful land and yes, speaking about these things is important. Your powerful piece lights the way for transformation!! And women ARE a significant part of that process!!! Keep your voice ringing!!!

AmaniK

Dr. Karambu Ringera
Founder and President, International Peace Initiatives
Vice President, Global Ecovillages Network (GEN) Africa
Advisory Board Member, Women Human Rights Institute, University of Toronto
Member and Delegate, Soroptimist Internationa

Fungai Machirori's picture

Thanks so much!

Writing is about shedding lightness in the darkness. I am glad to be able to do so for my country! Thank you again.

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

Rachael Maddock-Hughes's picture

Fabulous!

Wow, Fungai, you have really out done yourself this time. What an incredibly well-written, well-researched article. I learned more about Zimbabwe in a few minutes reading your article, than I have in the last couple of years combined. Keep writing, because I am sure that your voice can truly make a difference.

Great job!!!!!

Rachael

"In every human heart there are a few passions that last a lifetime. They're with us from the moment we're born, and nothing can dilute their intensity." Rob Brezny

This one was the assignment that gave me the most challenge - what to say, what not to say, how to make the reader experience a nation they might never have visited, and never might... There is so much else I could have said but I suppose I leave it to you to visit The House of Stone and find out more!

Thank you!

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

mrbeckbeck's picture

Putting your heart into it...

Fungai,

You are such a great writer! In this piece, as a reader, I can really feel your confusion, painful memories, frustrations. Zimbabwe will rise again, to her true historical greatness. The "House of Stone" reference takes the reader back way before the colonial experience, to a time of great power in Zimbabwe... a far-away dream now? No, with your leadership and vision, along with other solutions-oriented youth leaders, the future is bright.

The way you tell this story, by blending in statistics, personal stories, and a vision captivates me. I learned so much about Zimbabwe, and the prospects for a peaceful future. Political leadership needs to listen to the people, and likewise, people need to feel safe enough to speak up!

Oh the challenges are many, but there are as many or more creative, innovative solutions from women like you. Cheers to you, Fungai, for telling a story that needs to be heard!

Best,
Scott

Scott Beck
World Pulse Online Community Manager

Thanks Scott. This has been really useful feedback... I keep thinking that if more of us write about Zimbabwe, and not in that fatalistic and 'Don't go there, it's a war zone' way, we can help to build a more rounded and grounded perspective of our country. And this might get people interested in coming to see for themselves and to help our ailing economy through tourism and investment. And then Zimbabwe might rise again, might soar like that mythical bird that is her emblem. It is the duty of every Zimbabwean to add a stone back to the foundations of our house!!!!

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

mrbeckbeck's picture

I'd love to visit!

I'd love to visit Zimbabwe. I feel that there's so much beauty under the surface that I see here in the USA.

Keep rebuilding that house! :)

Scott Beck
World Pulse Online Community Manager

Fungai Machirori's picture

Do come along!

Yes Scott! Please do come along. And remember, if your shoe snaps, there is bound to be someone willing to lend you their very own. I love my people! If for nothing else, come to feel the love of a people who struggle but still know how to feel joy :)

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

Rudzanimbilu's picture

Zimbabwe...

Oh Fungai, your writing inspired me today to find Indaba my children by Credo Mutwa. It's been a year since I last read it and I don't know where it is. There's a chapter about Zimbabwe in Credo's mind but when you add to your writing I understand Zimbabwe more. Thank you for reminding us. I know how hard it is to leave home for very many reasons and i doubt if there is anything that can prepare one to settle in another country for safety and security. South Africans blazed a man alive in May 2008 xenophobic attacks and I have sat and analysed why we were so savage, I still can't give you an answer. We are not a nation that reads because if we did, we'd know the sacrifise that Zimbabwe contributed to our democratic country. Our exiles were educated and housed in Zimbabwe but today we look down upon them when they are crying for our help.

I would love to see Zimbabwe rise AGAIN and I can't wait for that day.

Rudzanimbilu Muthambi

Fungai Machirori's picture

Sister

A river and a border between us does not make us any different from each other. Zimbabwean, South African, Tswana, Malawian - we are all Africans! Yes, I remember when they blazed that Mozambican man alive. I remember when they burnt people's houses and told them to go back home. Last year, after the World Cup, I happened to be at the Beit Bridge border the following morning and I saw the fear of people who had decided to return home just in case the xenophobia flared up again. I saw families who had packed up their stoves, their fridges, their TVs, their sofas, their all and just decided to head back to Zimbabwe not really knowing what the future would bring.

I do hope that Zimbabwe will rise again. And I do hope that this will be soon, for her people continue to suffer and cry.

from today i live out of my imagination
i am more than my yesterday
tomorrow i plant a new seed
nothing that lies behind easy
nothing that is ahead real
my within is all i have today
*Napo Masheane*

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