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for unknown reasons... A Woman brutally flogged in public 50 Lashes / Video

World Pulse (Exclusive)- Publication of a video clip depicting a scene of two men in blue-police uniform- brutally flogging a young woman in public, has provoked a wave of anger in the middle of Sudanese expats, "emigres" and inside the Sudan.

Under the title: Al Bashir still flogs women in Sudan in 2010, Al Rakoba sudanese popular website published today Wednesday, a Youtube video showing a young women mercilessly forced to kneel and whipped for wearing pants as the source said, while she was trying to escape the atrocity. World Pulse is doing its best to get more details from neutral sources.

During this atrocity she was crying, calling her mother to come and save her and begging the policemen, in Arabic, to stop whipping. But they turned a deaf ear to her appeals as they were laughing and shouting at her to stop crying and let them finish lashing quickly because they were in hurry. They also threatened to replace flogging by two years in custody. The police had also urged the presence, to watch and take pictures of her. Watch the link (at I report/cnn.com, because it has been removed from the source I have mentioned above):
http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-527066

The Young lady features and skin color indicate that she could be from the northern regions of Sudan. Women punishment is normally conducted inside a room by a woman, during daytime, possibly, in the presence of people.But this punishment was carried out in public a matter that contradicts the way punishment is done according to Islamic laws.

Last year the Police apprehended a minor Christian who was 16-year-old (the photo)called Silva Kashif for wearing a knee-length skirt, and flogged her without referring to her parents or allowing her to have a defense.

In Sudan and under Al-Bashir regime, whipping is normally carried out immediately without enabling the victim to appeal the rule or seek any help. Women flogged are socially stigmatized and rejected by society for the rest of their lives.

At the Beginning, website hasn't given much information on the young lady or the crime she has committed.But later Aljazeera Mubashir, based in Qatari capital has revealed that the lady was apprehended and punished because of wearing pants in public.

Under the Al Bashir Islamic regime, flogging women has become a common phenomenon. The Sudanese government insists on flogging women for what it calls indecent outfits.Pants is considered a sensational dress and a lady in pants is normally subjected to apprehension, interrogation and can receive lashes that vary from 10 to 40 or 50. Under the (152) article of the Criminal Procedure Code of 1991, more than 40000 women were flogged in 2008, as the police head stated in an interview to the Al-Sharq Al-Awsat daily Arabic newspaper.

Last year "Pulse Wire website", covered the story of the Sudanese female journalist Lubna Al Hussein who was judged to flogging for wearing pants in public.. She could escaped the country regime and lives currently in France.Because of her stance, the world's attention was drawn to the brutal way women were treated in Sudan. (http://worldpulse.com/node/11570).
Lubna joined World Pulse online community last year and became active member.

Pulse Wire will publish information as soon as it gets and keeps the internet browsers updated on this story.

Worth noting that whipping, amputating and package lists of punishments were applied for the first time in the twentieth century during the Nimirie's regime (1969-1985), when he claimed applying Islamic Sharia, which people sarcastically called September laws, because they were applied in September 1983. These laws were frozen During Sadiq Al Mahdi's democratic regime (1985-1989). When Al-Bashir took the ruling in a coup d'etat in June 30, 1989 Flogging women has gained ground and become protected by the law.

Updated today at 10:45PM Saudi local time (Gmt+3)

This story was written for World Pulse’s Ending Violence Against Women Digital Action Campaign.

World Pulse believes that women's stories, recommendations, and collective rising leadership can—and will—bring an end to gender-based violence. The EVAW Campaign elicits powerful content from women on the ground, strengthens their confidence as vocal grassroots leaders, and ensures that influencers and powerful institutions hear their stories.
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Following the conversation in Arabic, I heard one of the policemen telling that the lady was flogged fifty lashes.
Please help download or transfer this link to another more safe place so that it would beavailable in case the Youtube administration deletes it.

Since this morning, this Video has been deleted twice from Al-Rakoba website because it condemns authorities in Sudan and incriminates and embarrass them. It is expected to be deleted again. So please help to transfer it to another program or place where it could be publish and allow the world to see how women are treated in Khartoum and what future awaits them under this regime.

if you couldn't see the video up in the article because it is temporarily removed, please go to thsese links here for direct uploading.
http://www.sudaneseonline.com/cgi-bin/sdb/2bb.cgi?seq=msg&board=310&msg=...
Pls. help distribute to human rights organisations and media.

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

New Links

Dearest sisters,

If the link in the article doesn't work, please visit this one: http://www.worldpulse.com/node/31930
and please have a look on this coverage also done by the Radio Nederland Wereldomroep at this link:
http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/outcry-over-public-lashings-women-sudan

Regards,

Halima

Tony's picture

Flogging the poor Silva Kashif

I have seen the horrible treatment this young lady endured while spectators mainly men are laughing and joking. It’s disgusting! I was lucky enough to watch few recorded TV series from Ramadan and Eid; I have seen many girls in tight pants and shirts showing their body contours like like like, I simply can’t say this but you hopefully got the idea. Programs financed by rich government officials showing girls in cloths I am only used in Toronto, Montreal and Milano and on the other hand poor Shiva was flogged possibly for wearing a uniform to go to work. May God bless the Sudan and the Sudanese and replace their corrupt government and politicians with a better government and clean honest politicians.

....Tony

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

government double standards

Dearest Tony,

Thank you so much for passing and sharing this valued comment.
Yes i got your point. The government is very skillful in applying double standards. Since its coup d'etat in June 30, 1989,it uses this norm to address the world. Allowing women to wear pants so as to send a message to the outside world that women are allowed to chose their outfits, and that all stories deny this are fake.

With the application of its policy of double standards successfully, it could achieved most of its goals, for example during the bloodbath between it and the Sudanese People's Liberation movement (SPLM) it was declaring to the world that the north-south conflict was a civil war, while the state-owned television and radio were talking about Jihad(holy war) and mobilizing people to join the popular defense and the fight against Southerners in the name of Allah and Jihad..
As a result, South Sudan will cede in a month's time and will form its newest state in Africa.

Regards,

Halima

Thank you for sharing this story, Halima. I've reposted it on Facebook and Twitter, believing that knowledge is power. I think the more people know about evil, the harder it becomes for evil to thrive. On the other hand, the man who whipped her was able to do so in the light of day. And, even though many people know that women around the world are suffering like this, it still continues. So what do we do? I don't have an answer. I do believe that the more of us who know, the more likely it is that the information will land in the hands of people who can answer that question.

I told one friend that what frightened me the most wasn't that the man whipped her - which was horrifying enough in and of itself - but that witnesses were afraid to intervene. So, I suppose one way to effect change is to stand up for each other in our day-to-day lives, and not to let bullies get away with attacking the helpless without at least speaking up in their defense. We cannot always solve problems elsewhere in the world, but we can do the next right thing as we walk through each day, and allow this video to remind us of the importance of vigilance.

Meanwhile, I'm ready to keep learning. Thank you for helping to teach.

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

Thank you Cara!

Dearest Cara,

This is the way Sudanese women are treated during the past twenty years (1991-2010). This is too much! This video has devastated me. I hate myself. My sex! Being a Sudanese! Being a female!
I read lots of articles on lashing, but didn't think it was so brutal till i saw with my bare eyes. seeing isn't like hearing. it was a chock to me.

This type of punishment doesn't distinguish between women. doesn't take into account their age, state of health, religion...etc.
a friend of mine told me yesterday that in the early 1990s, he read in one of the famous daily Arabic newspaper, a news item, that published in the front page, stating that Sudan had imported large amount of whips. He told me that he didn't figure out, at the moment, what was the purpose of importing such a stuff. NOW HE UNDERSTANDS!
As you said knowledge is power. but don't get astonished my friend when i tell you that the people who are standing have done nothing to help that wretch woman!, this a day routine.. they are accustomed to seeing women whipped in such a way during the previous two decades. They are in a hurry and want to finish as quickly as possible, there may be some others waiting to have their share of whipping.
I feel that , that is me who is flogged mercilessly. Jumped in horror every time the whip is raised high in the sky and come down on her body.

So long as we still have the power to be horrified by what should be horrifying, and so long as we remember to hold the perpetrators responsible and not the victims, there is hope. At least now more people know the truth, and you are helping to spread that truth. When people have information, action becomes more possible. But will anyone take that action, and what form will it take? We'll see. In the meantime, keep writing the truth. You are inspiring others.

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

follow this link

Here, some one has made a quick translation for the conversation and the young woman's call for her mum to come and free her. Please follow this link: http://www.sudaneseonline.com/cgi-bin/sdb/2bb.cgi?seq=msg&board=310&msg=...

jap21's picture

Hi Halima

This is the kind of violence that all women must render as UNACCEPTABLE. No government, no nation, no man, and moreover, no woman, can stand in silence when this is happening in the world.

I will share this online all I can, and will also post it in my own blog. Just got back home and now I can do it.

Love,

Jackie

Jacqueline Patiño FundActiva
Tarija - Bolivia
South America
www.jap21.wordpress.com

Dearest Jackie,

Thank you so much for passing and sharing this rich comment and for sharing this sad event online with your friends and your blog browsers! I totally agreed with you that no body can stand this inhumane treatment,and that all the world should stand in solidarity with Sudanese women to repeal these barbaric laws. It is high time to have a firm, collective stance against such degrading laws.

Love,

Halima

Coverage of the event in the international media:
1- guardian.co.uk:
Sudan's public order laws are about control, not morality
Randomly applied and loathed by the Sudanese, the laws are part of the government's attempt to shore up its power

Share
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Comments (68)

Nesrine Malik
guardian.co.uk, Saturday 11 December 2010 14.00 GMT
Article history

Lubna Hussein, centre, a former journalist and UN press officer, gesturing outside the court after her trial in Sudan in August last year. Photograph: Reuters
The spectre of flogging in Sudan has once again reared its grotesque head. After the furore caused by Lubna Hussein's "indecency trial", a video of a young woman being lashed has surfaced on the internet, causing disgust in Sudan and outside it.

The video makes for harrowing viewing. The casual nonchalance of the security forces and their occasional laughter as the distraught victim is lashed is unspeakably distressing. Even though Sudan has been under the rule of a loose and arbitrary version of sharia law for the past 20 years, and floggings are quite regular, the phenomenon still feels very alien to mainstream Sudanese society and inspires revulsion.

When it does happen, as shown in the video, it occurs in a haphazard, loosely regulated way. It is left to the security forces to enact a punishment in whatever way suits them – a far cry from Saudi Arabia's orchestrated spectacles in chop-chop square.

It has been heartening to see the outcry in Sudan. Both men and women have felt the sting of the whip in the past two decades, and there is a groundswell of anger and lamentation over the dramatic changes in Sudan in the past 20 years.

Northern Sudan was once a place where a symbiotic form of Islam was practised, one that married tribal and cultural mores with religious values and found its level somewhere therein. After the 1989 coup, a rigid Wahhabi-style system was imposed, in a random manner at that, with the new government adopting some of the Saudi legal system's more draconian laws and ignoring others entirely.

A quick and expedient template for imposing strict laws on behalf of an insecure government, it is a confused and confusing system. At least in Saudi Arabia it is fairly clear what is acceptable in terms of public deportment, whereas in Sudan, the sexes intermingle and women roam hijab-free and trouser-clad, yet may fall foul of the law for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. The "indecency" rules have been applied arbitrarily and have never really taken root among the Sudanese. The victims, more often than not, are the dispossessed and disenfranchised.

Regarding the recent video, the most common observation on Twitter and Facebook was that the victim (whose "crime", still unknown, may have been the wearing of trousers) would never have been flogged so publicly if had she been of a higher class or with some connections to intercede on her behalf. Most women who are flogged actually choose to take the flogging over challenging the decision and facing the ignominy – something that Lubna Hussein defied last year.

Article 152 of Sudan's 1991 Criminal Act, which allows for the flogging of women, hands a disproportionate amount of power to the enforcer, rendering him judge, jury and executioner all at once. Anyone from policemen to plainclothes security officers can take matters into their own hands by invoking the vague and generous allowance in the law, which states:

"Whoever commits, in a public place, an act, or conducts himself in an indecent manner, or a manner contrary to public morality, or wears an indecent, or immoral dress, which causes annoyance to public feelings, shall be punished, with whipping, not exceeding 40 lashes, or with fine, or with both. The act shall be deemed contrary to public morality, if it is so considered in the religion of the doer, or the custom of the country where the act occurs."

Amnesty International's report on the phenomenon says:

"The power given to the public order police to evaluate what is immoral and indecent has resulted in widespread breaches and abuses over the years. There have been many cases where officers have taken advantage of their position to blackmail women or men and to abuse them verbally and even physically. Women are left at the mercy of these decisions without guidelines on what can trigger their arrest in a public or private space."

Prostitutes, usually migrants from poorer areas bereft of family, funds or advocacy, bear the brunt of this.

The public order laws (including article 152) are naturally discriminatory against women, since a woman's dress or conduct is the most likely to offend male security forces. However, in a bad week for Sudan's image, where the international media's eyes are focused due to the coming referendum, seven male models were fined for wearing makeup at a fashion show.

What is indecent is the application of Sudan's public order laws, which have done nothing to preserve and enshrine any morality. They have assailed and violated the sensibilities and bodies of victims who are collateral in the government's failed experiment to exert control via a bogus claim of religious or social decency.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/dec/11/sudan-laws-control-n...

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

Washington post

Sudan to investigate video of woman being flogged

By MOHAMED OSMAN
The Associated Press
Sunday, December 12, 2010; 2:02 PM
KHARTOUM, Sudan -- Sudan's judiciary opened an investigation into a video of a woman being flogged that has been widely circulated on the Internet, the state news agency reported Sunday.

The video shows a woman in a voluminous cloak on her knees screaming and pleading with blue-uniformed policemen, identified as Sudanese, who take turns whipping her across the head and feet.

There is no way to verify the identity of the woman or the location of the event shown on the two minute video.

"The investigation was started immediately after the images of the young woman, being punished under Articles 154 and 155 of the 1991 Sudanese penal code, appeared on the Internet," the judiciary said in a statement.

The statement said the investigation would look into whether the punishment was implemented improperly.

Article 154 and 155 of the Sudanese penal code mandates flogging up to 100 lashes as a punishment for adultery or running a brothel, as well as up to five years in prison.

In 2009, Sudanese journalist Lubna Hussein was sentenced to 40 lashes under the country's controversial indecency law for appearing in public wearing trousers.

Under a storm of international criticism for the sentence, Hussein was eventually released with just a fine.

Sudan's government implements a conservative version of Islamic law in the north, and "public order" police enforce the laws, banning alcohol, breaking up parties and scolding men and women who mingle in public.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/12/12/AR201012...

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

Radio Netherlands Worldwide

Outcry over public lashings of women in Sudan
Published on : 9 December 2010 - 4:23pm | By RNW News Desk (RNW screenshot)
More about: adultery corporal punishment human rights lashings sharia women's rights
Graphic footage on YouTube showing a Sudanese woman being lashed have led to shocked reactions among Sudanese expats and emigrés.

Punitive public lashings are the order of the day, according to RNW's Ibrahim Jadelkarim, who is from Sudan. Tens of thousands of women are estimated to be subjected to this form of corporal punishment and public humiliation. It is unusual, however, for such scenes to be seen the world over via YouTube.

It is unclear what the woman was accused of, nor is her identity known.

YouTube has withdrawn the images from its site, arguing that the content violated the company's conditions of service. The footage can still be seen below. (Warning: these are shocking images.)

Indecent behaviour
The women involved are often accused of having committed adultery, of being improperly dressed in public, or of having behaved 'indecently' in other ways. Sudanese law, which is based on islamic Sharia rules, does not specify when clothing is considered indecent. This lack of definition allows policemen free reign to determine who is looking indecent. Women who were punished for such offences are usually too ashamed to speak about it.

Trousers
Journalist Lubna Ahmed al-Hussein was arrested last year for wearing trousers, considered offensive by the authorities. Unlike other women, Lubna went public about her arrest and invited hundreds of friends and the media to attend the court session.

She told Radio Netherlands Worldwide that her action changed the way lashing is viewed in Sudan. Corporal punishment has become a human rights issue there too, and more women are seeking publicity when they are sentenced to lashings.

However shocking the YouTube video may be, possibly it does contribute to the discussion about corporal punishment in Sudan.

http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/outcry-over-public-lashings-women-sudan

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

Scotsman

Sudan: Flogging video under investigation

Published Date: 13 December 2010
Sudan is investigating a video of a woman being flogged that has been widely circulated on the internet.
The state news agency said the judiciary is investigating why the punishment was carried out and whether it was implemented incorrectly.

The video shows a woman screaming and pleading with policemen whipping her on the head and feet.

http://news.scotsman.com/news/Sudan-Flogging-video-under-investigation.6...

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

Women for Peace

SUDAN: Outcry Over Public Lashings of Women in Sudan

Source: RadioDabanga
Date: December 10, 2010
Theme: Violence Against Women,
Country: Sudan
Graphic footage on YouTube showing a Sudanese woman being lashed have led to shocked reactions among Sudanese expats and emigrés.

Punitive public lashings are the order of the day, according to RNW's Ibrahim Jadelkarim, who is from Sudan. Tens of thousands of women are estimated to be subjected to this form of corporal punishment and public humiliation. It is unusual, however, for such scenes to be seen the world over via YouTube.

It is unclear what the woman was accused of, nor is her identity known.

YouTube has withdrawn the images from its site, arguing that the content violated the company's conditions of service. The footage can still be seen below. (Warning: these are shocking images; available at Radio Netherlands website: http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/outcry-over-public-lashings-women-sudan.)

Indecent behaviour
The women involved are often accused of having committed adultery, of being improperly dressed in public, or of having behaved 'indecently' in other ways. Sudanese law, which is based on islamic Sharia rules, does not specify when clothing is considered indecent. This lack of definition allows policemen free reign to determine who is looking indecent. Women who were punished for such offences are usually too ashamed to speak about it.

Trousers
Journalist Lubna Ahmed al-Hussein was arrested last year for wearing trousers, considered offensive by the authorities. Unlike other women, Lubna went public about her arrest and invited hundreds of friends and the media to attend the court session.

She told Radio Netherlands Worldwide that her action changed the way lashing is viewed in Sudan. Corporal punishment has become a human rights issue there too, and more women are seeking publicity when they are sentenced to lashings.

However shocking the YouTube video may be, possibly it does contribute to the discussion about corporal punishment in Sudan.

http://www.peacewomen.org/news_article.php?id=2583&type=news

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

Sudan tribune

VIDEO: Sudan’s judiciary orders probe into video of woman being flogged

ARTICLECOMMENTS (8)
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December 12, 2010 (KHARTOUM) – The Sudanese judicial authority on Sunday issued a statement announcing a probe into the manner by which a Sudanese woman was flogged as part of a punishment handed down on her, Sudan’s state media said.

This week a YouTube video surfaced showing an unidentified woman in a voluminous cloak on her knees screaming and pleading in agony and pain with blue-uniformed policemen who took turns whipping her across the head and feet.

The policemen are shown to be laughing as the woman received the punishment and they are heard saying that she is sentenced to 50 lashes.

The video stirred widespread outcry among Sudanese around the world and even some pro-government columnists wrote critically of the incident.

"The investigation was started immediately after the images of the young woman, being punished under Articles 154 and 155 of the 1991 Sudanese penal code, appeared on the Internet," the judiciary said in a statement.

The statement said the investigation would look into whether the punishment was carried out improperly.

Article 154 and 155 of the Sudanese penal code mandates flogging up to 100 lashes as a punishment for adultery or running a brothel, as well as up to five years in prison.

The deputy police chief Adel Al-Agib, speaking to the Dubai based Al-Arabiya TV, yesterday said that the timing of releasing the video was ill-intentioned to coincide with the Human Rights day of December 10th and to smear the image of the country.

At the beginning of the video the woman is asked to bend down or face two years in jail. A man standing is also heard asking the policemen to carry out the sentence quickly “so we can go [home]”.

“Oh my mom…enough” the unidentified woman is heard screaming.

The video brings to memory the case of a Sudanese female journalist who was arrested last year and charged with indecent clothing.

A former reporter who was working for the United Nations at the time of her arrest, Hussein has publicized her case, posing in loose trousers she was arrested in for photos and calling for media support.

Under international pressure and intense media coverage, Hussein was spared the 40 lashes stipulated under the charge and was fined an equivalent of $200.

She refused to pay the fine but the head of the pro-government journalists union made the payment and she was released from jail.

Sudan’s government implements a conservative version of Islamic law in the north, and "public order" police enforce the laws, banning alcohol, breaking up parties and scolding men and women who mingle in public.

(ST)
http://www.sudantribune.com/Sudan-s-judiciary-orders-probe,37253

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

blueridgenow.com

Sudan to investigate video of woman being flogged
By MOHAMED OSMAN Associated Press
Published: Sunday, December 12, 2010 at 2:02 p.m.
Last Modified: Sunday, December 12, 2010 at 2:02 p.m.
Sudan's judiciary opened an investigation into a video of a woman being flogged that has been widely circulated on the Internet, the state news agency reported Sunday.

The video shows a woman in a voluminous cloak on her knees screaming and pleading with blue-uniformed policemen, identified as Sudanese, who take turns whipping her across the head and feet.

There is no way to verify the identity of the woman or the location of the event shown on the two minute video.

"The investigation was started immediately after the images of the young woman, being punished under Articles 154 and 155 of the 1991 Sudanese penal code, appeared on the Internet," the judiciary said in a statement.

The statement said the investigation would look into whether the punishment was implemented improperly.

Article 154 and 155 of the Sudanese penal code mandates flogging up to 100 lashes as a punishment for adultery or running a brothel, as well as up to five years in prison.

In 2009, Sudanese journalist Lubna Hussein was sentenced to 40 lashes under the country's controversial indecency law for appearing in public wearing trousers.

Under a storm of international criticism for the sentence, Hussein was eventually released with just a fine.

Sudan's government implements a conservative version of Islamic law in the north, and "public order" police enforce the laws, banning alcohol, breaking up parties and scolding men and women who mingle in public.

http://www.blueridgenow.com/article/20101212/API/1012122023

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

SFGate

Sudan to investigate video of woman being flogged

By MOHAMED OSMAN, Associated Press

Sunday, December 12, 2010
Print E-mail Share Comments (6) Font | Size:

4

(12-12) 11:02 PST KHARTOUM, Sudan (AP) --

Sudan's judiciary opened an investigation into a video of a woman being flogged that has been widely circulated on the Internet, the state news agency reported Sunday.

The video shows a woman in a voluminous cloak on her knees screaming and pleading with blue-uniformed policemen, identified as Sudanese, who take turns whipping her across the head and feet.

There is no way to verify the identity of the woman or the location of the event shown on the two minute video.

"The investigation was started immediately after the images of the young woman, being punished under Articles 154 and 155 of the 1991 Sudanese penal code, appeared on the Internet," the judiciary said in a statement.

The statement said the investigation would look into whether the punishment was implemented improperly.

Article 154 and 155 of the Sudanese penal code mandates flogging up to 100 lashes as a punishment for adultery or running a brothel, as well as up to five years in prison.

In 2009, Sudanese journalist Lubna Hussein was sentenced to 40 lashes under the country's controversial indecency law for appearing in public wearing trousers.

Under a storm of international criticism for the sentence, Hussein was eventually released with just a fine.

Sudan's government implements a conservative version of Islamic law in the north, and "public order" police enforce the laws, banning alcohol, breaking up parties and scolding men and women who mingle in public.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2010/12/12/internationa...

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2010/12/12/internationa...

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

Radio Dabanga

Outcry over public lashings of women in Sudan
By Radio Netherlands Worldwide -- HILVERSUM
(

10 Dec
.) -

Graphic footage on YouTube showing a Sudanese woman being lashed have led to shocked reactions among Sudanese expats and emigrés.

Punitive public lashings are the order of the day, according to RNW's Ibrahim Jadelkarim, who is from Sudan. Tens of thousands of women are estimated to be subjected to this form of corporal punishment and public humiliation. It is unusual, however, for such scenes to be seen the world over via YouTube.

It is unclear what the woman was accused of, nor is her identity known.

YouTube has withdrawn the images from its site, arguing that the content violated the company's conditions of service. The footage can still be seen below. (Warning: these are shocking images; available at Radio Netherlands website: http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/outcry-over-public-lashings-women-sudan.)

Indecent behaviour
The women involved are often accused of having committed adultery, of being improperly dressed in public, or of having behaved 'indecently' in other ways. Sudanese law, which is based on islamic Sharia rules, does not specify when clothing is considered indecent. This lack of definition allows policemen free reign to determine who is looking indecent. Women who were punished for such offences are usually too ashamed to speak about it.

Trousers
Journalist Lubna Ahmed al-Hussein was arrested last year for wearing trousers, considered offensive by the authorities. Unlike other women, Lubna went public about her arrest and invited hundreds of friends and the media to attend the court session.

She told Radio Netherlands Worldwide that her action changed the way lashing is viewed in Sudan. Corporal punishment has become a human rights issue there too, and more women are seeking publicity when they are sentenced to lashings.

However shocking the YouTube video may be, possibly it does contribute to the discussion about corporal punishment in Sudan.

http://radiodabanga.org/node/6910

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

I report/cnn

Sudanese government.. lashing a women brutally
December 9, 2010 | Khartoum / Sudan, Sudan | Vetting explained
Posted by:
hagirseed
Viewed 5,131 times
Shared 311 times

iReport —
This is a very disturbing video. The human right in Sudan mean nothing to the Sudanese government and unfortunately we watch and do nothing, I am really sad that all I can do is share this to the whole world hopefully one day we will be able to make some major changes. This young woman was hopeless and as you can see hurt and violated we have to take a stand, speak on her behalf and get some justice.

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-527066

Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman's picture

Salem News

Dec-09-2010 16:23
Laughing and Lashing: A Women's Plight in Sudan - DISTURBING VIDEO

Alysha Atma Salem-News.com African Affairs Correspondent
“That could the mother or sister of any of us, nothing is worse than humiliating a human being like this” - Nassir Mansour

Woman being whipped in Sudan

(PORTLAND, Ore.) - A video showing the open whipping of a woman by a uniformed member of the government in Sudan, may be the most disturbing video ever published by Salem-News.com; it certainly ranks among the worst.

This video was taken within the last few weeks, at a police station in Omdurman, Sudan. The video was recorded by a member of the police force applying what is termed as 'general behavioral law.'

The video was leaked into Darfur this morning.

”Sadly, this happens all the time Khartoum," activist Rozan Ahmed said.

"Public lashings are held almost daily for two obvious reasons: to both humiliate the victim and 'remind' others to ‘behave’. Terror tactics and oppression have successfully turned most in the capital into walking zombies."

Ahmed says many living in Khartoum couldn't tell you what's happening 10km outside of Khartoum, let alone Darfur, or Southern Sudan, because they are kept sustainably ignorant.

"No stable healthcare or educational institutions, despite the oil revenues, has left many unhealthy and uneducated. State terror remains in full force, so they are scared and silenced. All the key ingredients required to forcibly maintaining control... while many dead bodies are found elsewhere in Sudan, Khartoum has become a bubble of dead men walking."

http://www.salem-news.com/articles/december092010/women-sudan-aa.php

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