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Introducing myself and my journal: Author invites youth to be in a book about global youth

About Me:
I'm writing a book about global youth viewpoints. I have a first draft if you'd like to critique and add to it. I still need input via response to my 11 questions. To see my vita, look at www.gaylekimball.info. I started a website for global youth to exchange ideas http://globalyouthspeakout.ning.com/main/index/addContent. You can see photos of schools I've visited on various continents at myspace.com/globalyouthviewpoints. Here are the questions to share with young people 19 and younger. Thanks!

Greetings from California. I'm writing a book that gives you and other young people around the world an opportunity to say what's on your mind. This is your chance to be heard. Many of you have wonderful suggestions for how to make our world a better to live in, so I'm asking people age 19 and under to respond to 10 questions. I’ll compare your answers by age, gender, and location.
See myspace.com/globalyouthviewpoints for the questions and photos of schools and students I’ve visited on three continents. Also see http://globalyouthspeakout.ning.com/main/index/addContent
(I’ve written other peer-based books for youth, including The Teen Trip: The Complete Resource Guide and How to Survive Your Parents’ Divorce: Kids’ Advice to Kids.) Please also forward to kids and their teachers so they can be part of the global youth book.
Thanks, Gayle Kimball, Ph.D. gkimball@csuchico.edu

1. If you could ask a question of the wisest person in the world,
what would you ask her or him about life?
2. What bothers you in your daily life? What practice best helps you stay calm?
3. If there was one thing you could change about adults, what
would it be?
4. What would you like to change about yourself?
5. What do you like to do for fun?
6. When have you felt most loved by someone else?
7. Why do you think you’re here on earth; what’s your purpose?
8. On a scale of 1 to 100, how highly would you grade your
school? Why?
9. What work would you like to do when you're an adult?
10. If you were the leader of your country, what changes would you make?
11. Imagine you get to write on a T-shirt going on a trip around the world. What do you want your T-mail to say to people?

What questions are missing that you’d like to answer? Your email. . . . . . .
What first name would you like used in the book to quote you?
How old are you?
Girl or boy?
What city and country do you live in?
Gracias! Merci! Danke! Arrigato! Chi chi!

> > > > >Previous Books:
> > > > > Essential Energy Tools book and 3 videos.
> > > > > 21st Century Families: Blueprints for Family-Friendly Workplaces,
Schools and Governments. (Equality Press)
> > > > > How to Create Your Ideal Workplace (Equality Press)
> > > > > The Teen Trip: The Complete Resource Guide (Equality Press)
> > > > > 50/50 Parenting (Lexington Books)
> > > > > 50/50 Marriage (Beacon Press)
> > > > > ed. Everything You Need to Know to Succeed After College (Equality
Press)
> > > > > How to Survive Your Parents' Divorce (Equality Press)
> > > > > ed. Women's Culture (Scarecrow Press)
ÿ > > > > Ed. Women's Culture Revisited. (Scarecrow Press, 2005)

My Passions:
empowering women and kids. I helped start and coordinate the Women's Studies program at Cal. State Univ. Chico.

My Challenges:
Getting input for the book from India.

My Vision for the Future:
Young people get that we need to protect our planet.

My Areas of Expertise:
See the list of books I've written.

Comments

Fatima Waziri's picture

Hey there! Welcome to

Hey there! Welcome to PulseWire!

Its so exciting having you with us, I am sure you will have a fun time with your new online friends and you will find this to be a positive experience. I encourage you to take advantage of the numerous resources and features available through our vibrant online community.

Welcome again to our global community and I look forward to hearing more from you here on PulseWire!

Peace!
Fatima

Maria Howe's picture

Greetings!

Welcome to World Pulse!

It is a joy to have you here. We look forward to learning more about you, your dreams and interests. Enjoy exploring the site and reading the thoughts and stories of fellow WP members. Please feel free to comment on posts and write in your journal. This is a friendly community and we are glad to have a new contributing voice. I am happy to answer any questions you may have. Thanks for joining us!

Regards,
Maria

michellee's picture

A warm welcome!

Hi Gayle,

I'm so glad you found our community! Your project sounds amazing and I encourage you to post in our Resource ExChange where you might get more responses to your questions. A number of our members work with youth around the world and may be able to help you. Sopheap Chak runs the Cambodian Youth Network for Change, Jane Kibuuka is a teacher in Uganda, and Lucy Ndungu works with teenage mothers in Kenya. Also, Leila is a young Kenyan you may want to connect with. Let me know if you have any questions about PulseWire and I will help to get you started.

Be well,

Michelle
World Pulse Technology Associate

gkimball's picture

question

Thanks Michelle for your specific suggestions. How do I contact individuals on the site? Best, Gayle

jadefrank's picture

Good question!

Hi Gayle,

Great question! If you click on the links Michelle provided, it will take you to the members' profile page. From there you can read their journal entries and leave a comment on one. Or you can also click on the small envelope that says "send a message", which will bring you to your internal messaging where you can send that person a private message. The third way to communicate is to click on the orange button next to their profile picture that says "Add to my community", where you will have an opportunity to send a message in the form of a friend request.

Let Michelle and I know if you have any additional questions!

Warm regards,
Jade

Online Community Manager
World Pulse

gkimball's picture

the environment, a book suggestion

All the talk about saving the planet for our grandchildren is alarmingly outdated, reports environmental writer Bill McKibben. He warns us, "The planet on which our civilization evolved no longer exists." Humans have already irrevocability harmed the planet so "our whole civilization stands on the edge of collapse." The maximum safe level of carbon dioxide is 350 parts per million, but it's already at 390 and headed towards 650.
Global warming causes less rainfall and reduces crop production, rivers are drying up, the ice caps and snowcaps are melting, glaciers are melting along with their reservoirs of water. The ocean is becoming warmer and more acidic as the water absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, destroying coral reefs and preventing shellfish from making strong shells. The melting frozen tundra releases methane, a heat-trapping gas, and as it gets hotter, trees and plants are less able to absorb carbon. Forests are dying and decreasing. Storms are becoming more powerful.
The outcome of global warming is more malnutrition, less food production and more food riots by hungry people, less drinkable water, battles over scarce resources, more mosquito-born diseases like dengue fever and malaria, stronger storms, and rising seas that will inundate low-lying areas. We're running out of oil while Asian demand for oil is rising. We would need to reduce fossil fuel use 20 times over the next few decades to return to 350 parts of carbon dioxide.
Nations are not willing to promise to cut carbon emissions, as evidenced in the failure of the 2009 Copenhagen conference, which McKibben calls a "fiasco." Giant companies like Exxon Mobil spew disinformation campaigns pretending that global warming is a natural trend and thousands of lobbyists work on Capitol Hill to prevent positive changes in US energy policies. China is planning to increase its coal production, even though respiratory illnesses are already rampant. "New planets require new habits," but we're stuck in the old ones that value growth and bigness. Green energy sources, like solar, wind and biofuels produce only about 1.7% of US energy.
McKibben's answer is to do more locally, smaller, and slower in the communities where we live. For example, people pay shares to support local organic farmers—including urban farming. Some communities have wind power and other energy cooperatives, as in Canada. The city of Portland models of how to conserve energy. We can eat less meat, because as much as half of global warming gases are caused by the livestock industry. Activists for these kinds of remedies can use the Internet to organize, as McKibben has. For updates, see www.350.org.

gkimball's picture

the environment, a book suggestion

All the talk about saving the planet for our grandchildren is alarmingly outdated, reports environmental writer Bill McKibben. He warns us, "The planet on which our civilization evolved no longer exists." Humans have already irrevocability harmed the planet so "our whole civilization stands on the edge of collapse." The maximum safe level of carbon dioxide is 350 parts per million, but it's already at 390 and headed towards 650.
Global warming causes less rainfall and reduces crop production, rivers are drying up, the ice caps and snowcaps are melting, glaciers are melting along with their reservoirs of water. The ocean is becoming warmer and more acidic as the water absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, destroying coral reefs and preventing shellfish from making strong shells. The melting frozen tundra releases methane, a heat-trapping gas, and as it gets hotter, trees and plants are less able to absorb carbon. Forests are dying and decreasing. Storms are becoming more powerful.
The outcome of global warming is more malnutrition, less food production and more food riots by hungry people, less drinkable water, battles over scarce resources, more mosquito-born diseases like dengue fever and malaria, stronger storms, and rising seas that will inundate low-lying areas. We're running out of oil while Asian demand for oil is rising. We would need to reduce fossil fuel use 20 times over the next few decades to return to 350 parts of carbon dioxide.
Nations are not willing to promise to cut carbon emissions, as evidenced in the failure of the 2009 Copenhagen conference, which McKibben calls a "fiasco." Giant companies like Exxon Mobil spew disinformation campaigns pretending that global warming is a natural trend and thousands of lobbyists work on Capitol Hill to prevent positive changes in US energy policies. China is planning to increase its coal production, even though respiratory illnesses are already rampant. "New planets require new habits," but we're stuck in the old ones that value growth and bigness. Green energy sources, like solar, wind and biofuels produce only about 1.7% of US energy.
McKibben's answer is to do more locally, smaller, and slower in the communities where we live. For example, people pay shares to support local organic farmers—including urban farming. Some communities have wind power and other energy cooperatives, as in Canada. The city of Portland models of how to conserve energy. We can eat less meat, because as much as half of global warming gases are caused by the livestock industry. Activists for these kinds of remedies can use the Internet to organize, as McKibben has. For updates, see www.350.org.

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