Voices of Our Future 2013

At World Pulse, we lift and unite women’s voices to accelerate their impact in the world. The purpose of Voices of Our Future is to foster a new generation of empowered women leaders actualizing and vocalizing their visions for change.

At the end of the program, each Correspondent will have gained technical skills in citizen journalism and digital empowerment and the personal confidence she needs to be an inspired leader in her own life, for her community, nation, and the world. She will become a loudspeaker, bringing attention to those that are voiceless and telling the stories that our world needs to hear.

"This program has confirmed what I already know—women need to speak out—or shout out—because we do have so much to say. We just need to give ourselves a chance. Voices of Our Future has allowed me to give myself that chance.” —Noreens, 2012 World Pulse Correspondent, Palestine

World Pulse partners with the Global Press Institute and the OpEd Project to deliver rigorous training in citizen journalism and digital empowerment. Each program participant is paired with a personal editor to help hone her unique voice and a personal mentor to help her map out and implement her vision for change.

“Being connected to this amazing and dynamic group of women, World Pulse staff, mentor and editor, gave me a new sense of purpose, direction, and drive.” —Marinieves Alba, 2012 VOF Correspondent, United States

Benefits of the full program include:

• Citizen journalism and digital empowerment training by renowned experts, including program partners The Global Press Institute and The Op-Ed Project
• Personal mentoring sessions and support from a Vision Mentor
• An Editorial Mentor to help hone her unique voice
• Opportunities for publication through World Pulse and partner media organizations
• Opportunities to connect with grassroots women leaders from around the globe
• Increased visibility for issues and challenges faced by her and her community

2013 Global Correspondents

We invite you to view an interactive map of our Correspondents and to read their profiles below.

Read the assignments of the Correspondents:


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flag Aminah

Maldives

Vision Mentor: Ketzel Levine
Editorial Mentor: Karoline Kemp

In a country where 1 in 3 women report having been the victim of a violent attack, Aminah is developing the strength and fortitude to take a stand against domestic abuse. She bravely shares her personal experiences of being a woman and examines the societal norms placed on women that keep them in these relationships. Aminah is developing the strength and fortitude to take a stand against widespread domestic abuse. She desires to serve as an inspiration to the many women that suffer in silence with nowhere to turn and to shed light on this urgent issue.

“Being women does not mean we have to endure hardships and cruelty in silent remorse. I want to shout out loud to all women and men that it should not hurt to be a woman.”


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flag Anab87j9

Sudan

Vision Mentor: Victoria Gonin
Editorial Mentor: Lisa Kislingbury Anderson

Originally from Sudan, a country plagued by civil war, Anab immigrated to the US to study. She believes that when women are connected, they become inspired to drive the wheels of change. She hopes to amplify the voices of women in her homeland and to shed light on the sexualized violence that effects Sudanese women at harrowing rates. She envisions a world that is inclusive of women, where no woman has to suffer because of culture, religion, or any political structure or law.

“I want to magnify the cries of survivors of sexual crimes so that it may be heard. I want us to reclaim the bodies that were scarred in the name of traditions, and for those scars to heal.”


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flag Ayunnie

Kenya

Vision Mentor: Valerie Bagley
Editorial Mentor: Bina Patel

Having buried her sister-in-law due to the HIV/AIDS pandemic, Ayunnie dreams of a Kenyan society free of disease, discrimination, and poverty. At the funeral, she was handed a microphone to give the eulogy: Instead she gave the audience an inspiring speech about social change, girls education, and the AIDS epidemic in Kenya. Soon after that, she started the Ramula HIV support group, which now has 350 members, in five different locations. Ayunnie prays for the day her country sees transformational change, and she believes that women will be at the helm of this shift.

“I envision a society that is free from all forms of dehumanizing cultural practices.”


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flag Bitani

Lebanon

Vision Mentor: Usha Sharma
Editorial Mentor: Carly Diaz

As one of seven daughters growing up in Lebanon, Bitani faced harsh truths of what it means to be a woman in a society that undervalues their contributions. Shortly after her birth, Bitani’s grandfather said, “Though she is a girl, we do not want her to die.” It was this support from her family that allowed her to become a vocal advocate for women’s rights. As a devout Muslim, she hopes for a day when the world can assess her religion and women’s roles within it with balance and understanding.

“I am interested in social justice as a whole, with issues ranging from access of poor nations to minimum standards of life to the rights of displaced nations in getting back to their homelands. However, the issue of Muslim women concerns me personally, for I am a devoted Muslim.”


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flag Deqa

Somalia

Vision Mentor: Susan Alvey
Editorial Mentor: Katherine Okerlund

As a shy girl growing up in the midst of the chaos of Somalia’s civil war, Deqa was among the lucky few who attended school despite the violence around her and cultural beliefs that deny many girls education. Still, she always had difficulty finding her voice until she made the courageous decision to further her education and go abroad to Malaysia. It was there that she became a loud speaker for the rights of girls in her community. She believes that educating girls will transform Somalia and that digital empowerment and mentorship programs will spark a revolution for women.

“I have always envisioned a peaceful and developed Somalia, and I have always believed that I am the face of that change.”


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flag Green Girl

Nigeria

Vision Mentor: Sarah Happel
Editorial Mentor: Sasha Rabin Waliinger

Green girl hails from the beautiful and resource-abundant country of Nigeria. She has witnessed the misuse and exploitation of her beloved land. She says these harmful policies have had the greatest impact on grassroots women. She desires to educate, inspire, and mobilize women on these issues and thereby empower them to speak out. She believes that the only way to ensure the environmental security of Nigeria is to make sure that women have an equal voice in these decisions.

“Together, women can crush and bridge the gender divide in the environmental sector.”


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flag Hideko N

Japan

Vision Mentor: Camille Ricketts
Editorial Mentor: Dikshya Karki

Hailing from Japan, Hideko moved to Nigeria to live with an abusive and violent fiancé. Nigerian laws did nothing to protect her and her daughter, so she turned to the International Federation of Women Lawyers who rescued her from this brutal situation. Hideko has since been on a quest to support the most disenfranchised people in Nigeria. She believes that networks like World Pulse can empower women to boldly stand up for their rights, their opinions, and their values.

“Our world today is interdependent: What one country does affect the conditions of other countries. Therefore, representing the voice of the voiceless is critical in today’s world. As a Voices of Our Correspondent, I am hoping to offer solutions to the problems of the world around us.”


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flag Iryna

Ukraine

Vision Mentor: Sally Hedman
Editorial Mentor: Heidi Hoffman

Iryna was born in the USSR before its collapse. Today, she lives in Ukraine where “being a feminist is on par with being a spy.” In the last presidential election, the president refused to debate his female opponent and justified it by saying that "a woman's place is in the kitchen." Growing up in this culture, Iryna has witnessed women harassed who remain silent. She feels a responsibility to support women’s empowerment by uniting through “beauty and trust.” She recognizes that being a feminist is an uphill battle, but knows that through unity the women of Ukraine can rise.

“We are here for changes. We are here to shout if it’s needed. We are here to raise our voices and build a wall of support for every single case when a woman is offended!”


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flag Jags 83

Malaysia

Vision Mentor: Ellen Wasyl
Editorial Mentor: Courtney Miller

Born to an middle class family in Malaysia, Gayathiri believes that everyone in her country deserves access to the opportunities she was afforded as a youth, in particular education. She feels a great sense of urgency to create a network of global connections that will support the empowerment of her fellow sisters. She believes that she can make significant change in her own community by challenging the thoughts and actions that cause inequalities and discrimination and telling the untold stories that are not covered by the media.

“The issues that women face as a result of trafficking, migration, and conflict permeates all of our societies and it can only be addressed with a concerted effort. I hope to identify and work together with like-minded women to address this issue which happens across borders and countries.”


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flag Jampa

Tibet

Vision Mentor: Ellen Wingard
Editorial Mentor: Hana Livingston

Born in a small village in the Tibetan plateau, Jampa is the first and only person from her village to attend a university abroad. She is currently working on small scale development projects and is driven to change the perception of what women in her community can contribute. She believes by applying her education and giving back to the community it will empower young girls to pursue their dreams. She plans to prove that educating girls can bring about positive change in society.

“My personal vision for my life is that I want to become a writer whose words become weapons to battle with violence and discrimination against women and girls.”


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flag Joy Spencer

Sierra Leone

Vision Mentor: Kelley Black
Editorial Mentor: Jacqueline Patino

Joy was born in Liberia to Sierra Leonean parents and spent most of her formative years living in Nigeria. Her multicultural background has led her to believe that every community has and will continue to offer value to the world. She seeks to challenge disempowering labels that have been placed upon the African woman and confidently attests that she will not wait for permission to challenge people’s mindsets. She wants her legacy to continue through the powerful human connections that can be made through digital media.

“It is so hard for our world to view African women the way African women know themselves to be—intelligent, strong, industrious, and powerful—and not needing to be rescued. It is so hard for this to be considered normal—not needing to be mentioned—rather than something that is strange or intriguing.”


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flag Klaudia Mexico

Mexico

Vision Mentor: Miriam Hawley
Editorial Mentor: Jana Potter

Heralding from a country that is one of the most dangerous places for a journalist to speak her truth, Klaudia Mexico is determined to use the craft of journalism to empower her Mexican sisters. With a passion for women’s health, she believes that education is the best way to prevent unnecessary maternal deaths and situations that can cause disabilities in children. She is certain that by gaining skills in digital media, she can bring momentum to efforts to prevent unnecessary deaths. She envisions a world where humans care about each other, all other species, and the planet.

“I firmly believe empowerment and education do not make us less of a woman. They make us better wives, mothers, leaders, and human beings.”


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flag LatiNegra

United States

Vision Mentor: Manya Arond-Thomas
Editorial Mentor: Frances Faulkner

Born and raised in the Bronx, LatiNegra is an Afro-Dominican healer and a leader in transforming women’s lives to achieve happiness and wholeness. As a birth doula, she hopes to raise awareness about maternal and infant health for women, specifically highlighting disparities in the US healthcare system for women of color. She believes that her voice is an instrument that will become part of the symphony of passion and revolution burning in the chests of women. LatiNegra brings hope that will guide us to a place of healing and empowerment.

“I believe that the world has become frighteningly medicalized and in the same breath, disconnected from compassionate care. Western medicine has given way to us forgetting that we are psychosomatic beings whose thoughts and emotions show up as disease in our bodies. In becoming a traditional midwife, I will encourage women of color to shift their view of birth from a pathological situation to be treated to a normal event to be honored and supported.”


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flag libudsuroy

Philippines

Vision Mentor: Sarah Whitten. Grigsby
Editorial Mentor: Leigh Anne Kranz

Libudsuroy reports from Mindanao, an island in the Philippines enduring decades of armed conflict. For her, sustainable peace can come only from listening to women peacebuilders on the ground. She believes that when grassroots women are digitally empowered, they can magnify their own voices. Thus, Libudsuroy envisions enabling women on peace fronts to weave strands of their stories of resilience and hope into global conversations on conflict transformation.

“I will strive to be there where women’s lives are continuing sagas of peace building…to wield the power of engendered conflict-sensitive journalism. For I believe these women are gifted with voices of their own. Only that their voices have been muted by extreme poverty, silenced by everyday violence. These voices are stifled by discrimination and hushed by the inconsolable grief of losing loved ones in brutal extra-judicial killings.”


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flag Mahrukh Pasha

Pakistan

Vision Mentor: Monica Lehner
Editorial Mentor: Christine Dahl

In Jacobabad, a rural village in Pakistan, Mahrukh was always told that only ‘loose women’ used the Internet. As a young girl, she bravely defied that cultural mandate and frequented a local Internet café, where she garnered knowledge otherwise unavailable to her.
In her community, child marriage is common due to poverty and lack of access to education, but Mahrukh desires to change her homeland’s perception of women. She believes that women’s wisdom is needed to change the tides of her society, and she plans to begin by healing and rebuilding women and girls’ perceptions of their worth.

“My life goal is to make people and especially women believe that they can be anything they want by having true determination, devotion, and honesty. We can kill the biggest monsters and create the amazing angel of hope and love.”


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flag Phionah Musumba

Kenya

Vision Mentor: Lina Foster
Editorial Mentor: Priyanka Borpujari

Phionah dropped out of high school before graduating because her family was no longer able to afford the fees. She married at 17 and became a mother. Her options as an undereducated woman in Kenya were limited and she knew that. She became determined to go back to school as an adult, graduated and received a scholarship to go to college. Phionah decided to study to become a journalist in order to shine light on the problems women were facing in her community. Her strong desire to bring change led her to open the Center for Disadvantaged Girls in Nairobi.

“I envision a future where women don't have to walk tens of kilometres to fetch a few liters of water, a future where women will be given equal rights to education and leadership posts as men, where our kids don't die for lack of food and medical attention ”


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flag Monica 09

Bangladesh

Vision Mentor: Virginia Williams
Editorial Mentor: Kabukabu Ikwueme

Monica is creative, especially with words. To describe her love for books she coined the term “bookaholic.” A learner for life, she loves to acquire new skills, explore new ideas, places, and meet people. Through her writing she hopes to reach women and teach them about their rights and technology. Monica is proud to say that thanks to her perseverance, her mother can now operate a cellphone and understands that women in Bangladesh have the right to protest. She envisions a world that is safer and more equitable for all its inhabitants.

“As a journalist, I am committed to bringing social issues, especially the gender-based violence epidemic, at the forefront of media discussions.”


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flag Mukut

India

Vision Mentor: Lynne Healy
Editorial Mentor: Katya Andrusz

Mukut is an idealist. She dreams of an India which does not blame victims when they are raped, an India that views women as independent individuals and not as extensions of their husbands or fathers. She is passionate about fighting for a just and equal society. Her dream is to nurture a sense of love and tolerance in every soul and being. She is involved with Deoraj Trust, a non-profit initiative in New Delhi that hopes to put a smile on millions of faces.

“Our vision must inspire us, equip us, and ultimately create a unique us, to unlock our full 'feminine' potential.”


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flag Nadz

Jamaica

Vision Mentor: Heather Andersen
Editorial Mentor: Mary Kiio

Nadeen grew up in a large family in a small rural village in the south of Jamaica. When she became pregnant at age 17, she thought her life was over. Instead, her life has been enriched as she has stepped into the role of mentor to girls in her community. Today she is the executive director of the I'm Glad I'm a Girl Foundation, where she draws on her life experience to help young women gain confidence and take control of their lives.

“I pride myself on being a woman who is a social justice advocate and who speaks for the most vulnerable girls and young women or perhaps someone who helps them to find their voice so that they can speak for themselves.”


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flag Nakinti

Cameroom

Vision Mentor: Molly Rudberg
Editorial Mentor: Orion Lumiere

Nakinti grew up on a rural farm in a poor family in the Cameroon. While she was away at school, her younger sisters helped at the farm and ensured that there was enough money for the older siblings to go to school. Nakinti wants to know, she wants to learn, and she wants to share with the world the damaging practices that hurt and even kill women in her country. Nakinti is hungry for change, and she wants to teach by example. Her passion for writing has brought her to a career in journalism where she is currently a reporter for the Global Press Institute, covering important issues impacting women in her community. Her dream is to see the elimination of discrimination against women in Africa.

“I talk to parents on the importance of girl child education. Many parents say they don’t need to be told anymore; they say they admire the huge success that the women of my family have achieved.”


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flag Nechesa

United States

Vision Mentor: Grace Wanjiiru
Editorial Mentor: Leigh Cuen

In 1944, Nechesa’s grandmother refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on an interstate bus in a racially segregated United States. Today Nechesa honors the legacy of her grandmother and other heroes by designing T-shirts that celebrate the accomplishments of revolutionary leaders. She is working on a series of videos featuring courageous people from around the world. Through the women who came before her, Nechesa is finding strength and the power of her own voice. She is ready to face success head on.

“What I believe I can contribute is simple: my heart and my voice. They're my strength and the tools I will utilize to make my vision a reality.”


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flag Passy Mubalama

DRC

Vision Mentor: Elaine Milliam
Editorial Mentor: Pushpa Achanta

Passy Mubalama

Passy lives in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a country many call “the worst place in the world to be a woman.” She is the eldest of 12 and the only one of her siblings to have had an opportunity to go to college. While attending university, she realized that women have rights and that when women know their rights they can be empowered to create change. Armed with strength and a passion for journalism, she hopes to drive the future of her country.

“For such changes to occur, we must have a vision. My vision is to show women that we can have vision and to get there we need to support each other.”


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flag Tash

South Africa

Vision Mentor: Eileen Page
Editorial Mentor: Samiha Nettikkara

Originally from a country where being gay carries a potential penalty of death, Tash is a vocal advocate for LGBT rights. She vows to fight until governments stop imprisoning people based on their sexual orientation, until children’s rights are recognized, until women are equal. A law school graduate, she believes that one does not have to be discriminated against to care about the plight of gays and lesbians. She will shout endlessly if she has to, and she will be heard.

“We all live and breathe the same air; we should all be able to enjoy the same rights and freedoms without encroaching on others’ freedoms.”


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flag Pelamutunzi

Zimbabwe

Vision Mentor: Debra Engle
Editorial Mentor: Sandra Gaitan Tabuyo

At a very early age, Pelamutunzi realized that the status of women in her country needed improvement. Why was her mother staying with her unfaithful father? Why were girls beaten and abused in Zimbabwe? Why did her teacher tell her class that all women are dirty and disgusting? While searching for answers to these questions, Pelamutunzi discovered that girls’ education is key. Her vision is to empower girls about their sexual and reproductive health and to teach them to speak for themselves and share their life experiences.

“Girls should be empowered from an early stage to understand their worth instead of trying to change their mindsets when they are adults. I teach girls who are already afraid to speak.”


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flag Precious M

Cameroon

Vision Mentor: Deborah Busser
Editorial Mentor: Sarah O'Leary

Because of her gender, Precious M has been harassed. She has been silenced. She has been denied employment, denied pay, and hassled in the streets of the Cameroon. But Precious sees a new future for the women of her country. Inspired by her mother’s accomplishments, Precious has built a name for herself in broadcast journalism. She aims to be a powerful voice for those who are unable to speak for themselves. She hopes to be a film producer and believes that video storytelling can—and will—change the future of her homeland.

“True to my name, I am Precious.”


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flag Rabia.Salihi

Afghanistan

Vision Mentor: Danica Holley
Editorial Mentor: Ma.Aileen Reyes

Rabia’s life journey took her from the confines of a small community in Afghanistan to Bangladesh, where she studies at the Asian University for Women. It was there that she discovered that girls too can play sports. She was even able to convince her mother that a dignified woman can play basketball. Rabia’s dream is to give a voice to the silenced and report on important but neglected issues. She hopes to open new doors for herself and the women of her country.

“I threw away the silence and raised my voice to talk for me. I want to help any other person like me to throw away the silence they are gifted usually from their society, and get a tool that can at least make their dreams known, their voice. For this, I myself need to be a voice.”


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flag Rebecca R

Uganda

Vision Mentor: Clarice Scriber
Editorial Mentor: Sherry Helmke

Rebecca is fighting what she calls the “linguistic oppression” that prevents women from speaking up and being part of the dialogue. She is a journalist and blogger in Uganda, raising awareness about women’s issues and educating her coworkers about the importance of reporting on women. She strongly believes that language can be used to drive social change. Rebecca teaches adult literacy classes, empowering women with the gift of eloquence.

“I told him I wrote because I wanted my nieces and their sisters to have a world that was better than what their mothers and our mothers had.”


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flag Shahd

Iraq

Vision Mentor: Robyn Lui
Editorial Mentor: Swati Mehta

Shahd has a fire inside of her. It took some time before she realized she could transform her anger into positive energy to change her country of Iraq. Her nation has suffered years of war and Shahd has witnessed death, rape, kidnappings, and childhood innocence violated; she has experienced relocation and powerlessness. She has found solace in the Internet where she can connect and learn about ways she can empower young women to find their voices and stand up for their rights.

“If I wanted to be a free woman, if I wanted to share equal opportunity with men, I should start with myself. I should have faith in me. My rights are already there, I am the one who should pursue and fight for them.”


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flag Tina N

Malawi

Vision Mentor: Beatrice Woody
Editorial Mentor: Tara Celentano

As a young girl, Tina watched a movie about people traveling to space. At that moment, she decided that she would become an engineer and build her own rocket to go to the moon. Despite cultural barriers, she studied hard and became one of only a handful of women engineers in her homeland of Malawi. Today, she travels to schools across the country and gives motivational talks to girls to inspire them to stay in school, pursue a higher education, and dream one day, as she did, of traveling to distant places.

“My personal vision for the future is a Malawi that will stand on its own and such a place is only possible if girls and women realize their potential.”


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flag Vweta

Nigeria

Vision Mentor: Barbara Shipka
Editorial Mentor: Nasreen Amina

As a teenager, Vweta lost her voice following an emergency tracheotomy. For years she has struggled to improve her health and regain her voice. When she was finally able to speak, she decided to be a spokesperson for disabled women in Nigeria who are discriminated against and taken advantage of because of their handicap. Vweta envisions an egalitarian world where women hold the highest offices possible.

“I have a story to tell—a story of rejection, anger, depression, deep sadness, struggles, disappointments, forgone alternatives, weaknesses, trial and error, prejudice, persistence, hope, strength, resilience, and victory. Yes! I have a story to tell; it is my story, but it is also the story of every woman, man, girl, boy, disabled or not.”


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flag Yosra Akasha

Sudan

Vision Mentor: Amy Kessel
Editorial Mentor: Yvette Warren

Yosra grew up in Sudan, during times of war. Her personal vision for her community and her country was shaped by the world she lives in, and her up-close encounter with death and injustices. She has joined several health promotion campaigns in Sudan and regularly writes and blogs about discrimination against women in an effort to inform and inspire. Yosra is seeking a better future for her daughters, and for girls all over the world.

“I believe in the universality of the human need for peace and freedom. I seek justice for my nation, the nations striving under dictatorships rule, the impoverished persons everywhere, and women who suffer because Allah has created them female. I stand by the disadvantaged.”

Related links:

Voices of Our Future 2013 Vision Mentors

World Pulse has a designed a unique mentoring framework for Voices of Our Future! Building on the generous support and best practices of the Empowerment Institute, World Pulse worked with Ellen Wingard to design a methodology that is focused on creating a transformational partnership that champions, nurtures, catalyzes, challenges and supports Correspondents to achieve their visions for change. We are redefining the traditional notion of mentoring from "power bestowed" to "power from within" because we believe that each of us has what it takes to achieve our dreams within us.

Thank you to all the professional women who are dedicating their time and passion to helping the next generation of grassroots women leaders succeed!


Ellen Wingard

United States Ellen Wingard

Correspondent: Jampa

Ellen Wingard is an early innovator in leadership coaching with 28 years experience working with emerging and senior leaders across the globe. She is dedicated to advancing and promoting the social and economic empowerment of women through social entrepreneurship, intergenerational mentoring and cross cultural partnerships. Ellen is on the faculty to the Institute for Women’s Leadership, a member of the Harvard Kennedy School Womens Leadership Board, author of Enlightened Power: How Women Are Transforming the Practice of Leadership and a board member of World Pulse. Ellen recognizes the power of the Voices of Our Future Program as a vehicle for transformational social change, the empowerment of grassroots leaders and mutual healing for all engaged across borders.


Amy Kessel

United States Amy Kessel

Correspondent: Yosra Akasha


Barbara Shipka

United States Barbara Shipka

Correspondent: Vweta


Beatrice Woody

United States Beatrice Woody

Correspondent: TinaN


Robyn Lui

Australia Robyn Lui

Correspondent: Shahd


Clarice Scriber

United States Clarice Scriber

Correspondent: Rebecca R


Deborah Busser

United States Deb Busser

Correspondent: Precious M


Monica Lehner

United States Monica Lehner

Correspondent: Mahrukh Pasha


Sarah Whitten

United States Sarah Whitten

Correspondent: Libudsuroy


Debra Engle

United States Debra Engle

Correspondent: Pelamutunzi


Molly Rudberg

United States Molly Rudberg

Correspondent: Nakinti


Lynne Healy

United Kingdom Lynne Healy

Correspondent: Mukut


Heather Andersen

United States Heather Andersen

Correspondent: Nadz


Manya Arond-Thomas

Ecuador Manya Arond-Thomas

Correspondent: LatiNegra


Miriam Hawley

United States Miriam Hawley

Correspondent: Klaudia Mexico


Kelley Black

United States Kelley Black

Correspondent: Joy Spencer


Ellen Wasly

United States Ellen Wasly

Correspondent: Jags 83


Elaine Millam

United States Elaine Millam

Correspondent: Passy Mubalama


Eileen Page

New Zealand Eileen Page

Correspondent: Tash


Sally Hedman

United States Sally Hedman

Correspondent: Iryna


Camille Ricketts

United States Camille Ricketts

Correspondent: Hideko N.


Sarah Happel

United States Sarah Happel

Correspondent: Greengirl


Susan Alvey

United States Susan Alvey

Correspondent: Deqa


Usha Sharma

United States Usha Sharma

Correspondent: Bitani


Valerie Bagley

United States Valerie Bagley

Correspondent: Ayunnie


Victoria Gonin

United States Victoria Gonin

Correspondent: Anab87j9


Ketzel Levine

United States Ketzel Levine

Correspondent: Aminah


Virginia Williams

Switzerland Virginia Williams

Correspondent: Monica09


Grace Wanjiiru

South Africa Grace Wanjiiru

Correspondent: Nechesa


Lina Foster

United States Lina Foster

Correspondent: Maya Norton

Voices of Our Future 2013 Editorial Mentors

World Pulse has created a network of Editorial Mentors to champion, nurture, catalyze, challenge and support Voices of Our Future Correspondents throughout the program. Editorial Mentors use their expertise as writers, bloggers and journalists to help Correspondents hone their unique voices and communicate their visions to a global audience.

Thank you to all the professional women who are dedicating their time and passion to helping the next generation of grassroots women leaders succeed!


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flag Bina Patel

Correspondent: Ayunnie


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flag Carly Diaz

Correspondent: Bitani


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flag Christine Dahl

Correspondent: Mahrukh Pasha


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flag Courtney Miller

Correspondent: Jags 83


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flag Dikshya Karki

Correspondent: Hideko N


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flag Frances Faulkner

Correspondent: LatiNegra


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flag Hana Livingston

Correspondent: Jampa


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flag Heidi Hoffman

Correspondent: Iryna


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flag Jacqueline Patino

Correspondent: Joy Spencer


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flag Jana Potter

Correspondent: Klaudia Mexico


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flag Kabukabu Ikwueme

Correspondent: Monica 09


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flag Karoline Kemp

Correspondent: Aminah


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flag Katherine Okerlund

Correspondent: Deqa


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flag Katya Andrusz

Correspondent: Mukut


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flag Leigh Anne Kranz

Correspondent: Libudsuroy


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flag Leigh Cuen

Correspondent: Nechesa


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flag Lisa Kislingbury Anderson

Correspondent: Anab87j9


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flag Ma.Aileen Reyes

Correspondent: Rabia.Salihi


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flag Mary Kiio

Correspondent: Nadz


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flag Orion Lumiere

Correspondent: Nakinti


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flag Priyanka Borpujari

Correspondent: Maya Norton


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flag Pushpa Achanta

Correspondent: Passy Mubalama


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flag Samiha Nettikkara

Correspondent: Tash


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flag Sandra Gaitan Tabuyo

Correspondent: Pelamutunzi


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flag Sarah O'Leary

Correspondent: Precious M


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flag Sasha Rabin Waliinger

Correspondent: Green Girl


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flag Sherry Helmke

Correspondent: Rebecca R


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flag Swati Mehta

Correspondent: Shahd


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flag Tara Celentano

Correspondent: Tina N


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flag Nasreen Amina

Correspondent: Vweta


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flag Yvette Warren

Correspondent: Yosra Akasha

Voices of Our Future 2012

2012 Global Correspondents

We invite you to view an interactive map of our Correspondents, or read their profiles below.


Aliya Bashir

Kashmir Aliya Bashir

Kashmir

Mentor: Carol Adams
Editorial Midwife: Karoline Kemp

Surrounded by fear, militarism and violence in war-torn Kashmir, Aliya embraces her role as a journalist to seek out solutions, and the often hidden, small ways that women are making a difference. She believes women have a crucial role to play in peace and reconciliation, government decision making and all efforts to build a sustainable future for her homeland.

“More women should feel empowered and break all the shackles of marginalization to be a part of peace negotiations and political processes to resolve the long-pending Kashmir conflict.”


Amiesissoho

Gambia amiesissoho

Gambia

Mentor: Virginia Williams
Editorial Midwife: Jan Askin

An activist journalist, amiesissoho is a bridge between rural and urban, literate and illiterate women in Gambia. Having overcome her own fear of technology to become a loudspeaker for women’s rights, she seeks to empower women using alternative media. She is creating a local platform where women can speak in their own language, tell their stories, and share their solutions. Amiesissoho believes that when women realize the power in their voices, they can change the world.

“My personal vision is women at grassroots level have access to alternative media to speak out against their oppression and marginalization.”


Celine

Nigeria Celine

Nigeria

Mentor: Christie Hardwick
Editorial Midwife: Kristin Miller

Celine was born in a poor eastern Nigerian suburb during the civil war and developed a physical disability during childhood. As a woman growing up in a patriarchal society and living with a physical disability, Celine faced malnutrition, marginalization, stigmatization, and discrimination, and now bears the weight of severe trauma. However, Celine refuses to let these obstacles get in the way of her dream: to transform the lives of women with disabilities. She is realizing her dream by creating empowerment and public sensitization programs focused on equality, dignity, and respect for women with disabilities.

“I am on a journey of faith to fulfill a vision to use web 2.0 to free women from oppression, suppression, and discrimination.”


Chinemu

Zambia Chinemu

Zambia

Mentor: Eileen Page
Editorial Midwife: Jinx Faulkner

Growing up in Zambia, Chinemu found a way out of poverty through education. Currently she is working on a project to equip youth with a range of income-earing skills, so that they too can avoid a life of struggle. Chinemu also works as a journalist, using the power of the pen to confront the problems young girls face in a patriarchal society. She sees the potential for World Pulse to help her reach a wider audience and act as a loudspeaker for the issues in her community.

“I wish to share my vision with the world, share ideas and transform them to reality and see more and more children liberated from the chains of poverty.”


Duda

Serbia Duda

Serbia

Mentor: Kat Haber
Editorial Midwife: Elizabeth Fautsch

Caught in the middle of the Serbian-Croatian war in the 1990s, Dubravka’s life changed forever. Her freedoms disappeared, and the threads of her life and community unraveled within a few years. Fast forward to now: Dubravka lives in a small town on the Hungarian border with infrequent electricity. Internet is her door to create the world that she envisions. She seeks out information on issues most dear to her - protecting women and preventing domestic violence. She begins to tell her community’s stories. Again her life is changing in front of her eyes, but this time she is regaining her freedom.

“I have to connect women of Serbia and help them to collaborate, and do not let them be forgotten like Robinson Crusoe on his island.”


Hummingbird

Syria Hummingbird

Syria

Mentor: Sarah Whitten
Editorial Midwife: Emily Brewer

Hummingbird spent many years as a young woman in Syria suffering deeply simply for not wanting to accept a woman’s traditional subservient role. She endured beatings and humiliation in a loveless marriage, finding solace and inspiration only in books. That is, until one day, she had enough and packed her bags and left. Since that day, even as her country has fallen into deepening violence and repression, she has become more courageous and self-assured. Hummingbird sees the potential to use new media to transform her country —and the world — by unleashing women’s concealed aspirations and wisdom.

“I always encourage my sisters to be fearless, it is never too late to stop the damage or accept change.”


Ikirimat

Uganda Ikirimat

Uganda

Mentor: Amy Kessel
Editorial Midwife: Amy Maroney

In Uganda, where violence against women and teen pregnancy are normal occurrences, Ikirmat is determined to make a difference in the lives of women. She is challenging harmful cultural and religious practices in her community with knowledge through her Sexual Health Improvement Project. By training community health educators how to reach out to youth in their communities, she is giving the next generation of girls and young women access to knowledge about their rights and the resources they need to lead healthy, successful lives.

“I have found comfort, a family in World Pulse, who is ready to listen, to share, to guide me in my voyage in achieving the my dream.”


Juliette Maughan

Barbados Juliette Maughan

Barbados

Mentor: Anjana Pursnani
Editorial Midwife: Sally Hedman

Hailing from the small Caribbean nation of Barbados, Juliette believes that her region is all too often sidelined in international policy conversations. She is working to break this pattern and make an impact at home and abroad, first by discovering her own voice, and then by inspiring Caribbean individuals to speak out and create change for themselves. Her biggest life dreams include founding a youth leadership academy in her region, and starting an investment fund for entrepreneurs in the Caribbean and Africa.

“When like-minded individuals come together and advocate around a particular issue, gather the right information and take action there is greater impact.”


katyrdz

Mexico katyrdz

Mexico

Mentor: Ann O'Fallon
Editorial Midwife: Leslie Parrilla

Hailing from Mexico, Katy witnesses fear and intimidation from the growing political violence silencing many women in her country. She is committed to protection and advocacy of women’s and girls' rights, and the need for women from all backgrounds to unite for social justice. Concerned about the media’s lack of coverage of how violence affects women, Katy develops initiatives for community development and organizes social media training workshops for women.

“Big changes are happening in this country and the world needs to know about them. Women and girls in Mexico are in spite of all, very alive and working to build a better world for our families.”


lymalin

Cambodia lymalin

Cambodia

Mentor: Shirley Clark
Editorial Midwife: Caitlyn Henry

As an expressive young girl, Ly was able to avoid an arranged marriage through a combination of convincing argument and excellence in her studies. Today she works as a parliamentary observer, where she is able to gain an inside perspective on government. Her hard work is bringing her closer to her personal dream: to be an outspoken female politician, confronting injustices such as child rape. She hopes to change the face of political decision-making by inspiring more female and youth participation.

“My voice through Would Pulse will bring Cambodian women’s issues to the world and back with solutions.”


Maddy M

Nicaragua Maddy M

Nicaragua

Mentor: Jane Wells
Editorial Midwife: Roz Siegel

Growing up in Nicaragua during a time of war and radical social change, Maddy witnessed acts of violence and destruction, but also instances of solidarity and hope. Today Maddy sees political polarization, coupled with biased media sources, as one of the biggest challenges to equality, non-violence, and collaboration. Maddy’s self-confidence, based on her faith, helps her find the strength to work towards her vision of promoting hope and positive social change. Her work experience in nonprofit organizations facilitating relationships between communities of faith has reinforced her commitment to create meaningful connections between seemingly different people.

“This worldwide women’s movement using new media shows a crucial change in the way we relate to technology, it is no longer a ‘man’s domain.’ We are tearing down walls and erasing borders that have kept us apart.”


MaDube

Zimbabwe MaDube

Zimbabwe

Mentor: Judy Kugelmass
Editorial Midwife: Barbara Bracewell

MaDube is a Zimbabwean lawyer by profession and a human rights advocate by calling. As an observer in her country’s 2008 elections, she bore witness to violence and intimidation, primarily targeted at women. She is now using her voice in this repressive environment to link politics, law, and human rights to defend the dignity of women and demand change in her country.

“The possibility of facing reprisals for speaking out is high, but silence is not an option.”


malba66

United States malba66

United States

Mentor: Paulette Common
Editorial Midwife: Julie Tomlin

Raised in a working class neighborhood in the South Bronx, malba66 is a Puerto Rican/Panamanian activist, producer and writer who has worked in the arts, and youth and community development throughout the US and Latin America for over 15 years. She currently works with low-income, immigrant youth and families to overcome barriers to quality public education. Malba66 believes that through art and media, the voices of marginalized people must be brought to a global stage to help promote dialogue on peace and justice.

“Documenting and telling stories is central to my life project, mostly because my story—and the stories of my community as a Puerto Rican, Panamanian, working class woman and mother in the United States—is rarely given a forum.”


Mirette

Egypt mirette

Egypt

Mentor: Mary Bennett
Editorial Midwife: Leslie Stoupas

As a young girl growing up in Egypt, Mirette discovered the power of the written word as a healing tool to deal with the challenges she faced. After leaving an unfulfilling banking job, she pursued community development work as a way to combine her love of writing and her passion for children. She is currently developing a project for youth to engage in interfaith dialogue and collaborative community work, while connecting to their common identity as Egyptian citizens in the post-Mubarak Egypt.

“My vision is to be a mentor for children and youth, especially girls, and help them to find themselves and their mission in life, to lead a healthy, happy and successful life.”


Mlaphimon

Thailand mlaphimon

Thailand

Mentor: Ruth Beedle
Editorial Midwife: Lisa Cox

A social activist, community researcher and writer, mlaphimon seeks to bring to light the stories and insights of women of Thailand and the Greater Mekong Subregion. Working at the intersection of HIV and Violence Against Women, she struggles daily to ensure that the sexual and reproductive rights of all people, particularly sexual minorities, are respected and enforced. Mlaphimon seeks to engage a global audience to nurture mutual respect, understanding and acceptance.

“I foresee the world with sexual diversity. In so doing, a tolerant community where women can defend their rights over their bodies without fear of social stigma and discrimination can become reality.”


Monica Clarke

South Africa Monica Clarke

South Africa

Mentor: Elaine Millam
Editorial Midwife: Michelle Coburn

Monica Clarke is a passionate voice trying to end gender based violence in South Africa. She wants to bring to light the majority of abuse that goes unreported, and compel her government to create fair, strong, and objective laws, and ensure that every citizen feels empowered to step forward when they witness assault and abuse. Monica sees mobile technology as a way to carry out her vision of creating a national database which will help track and disseminate key information on gender based violence.

“I know that my little light is joined by millions of others across the skies, buoyant and luminous; that my little sound reverberates within thunder; and my drop of water feeds the sea.”


Nasreenamina

Argentina nasreenamina

Argentina

Mentor: Clarice Scriber
Editorial Midwife: Abigail Diskin

Nasreenamina is a Chilean writer and activist living in Buenos Aires who wants the world to know how women are changing their realities in South America. As converted Muslim, she helps give voice to other Muslim women around the globe by interviewing them on topics such as the portrayal of women in educational systems in North Africa. Nasreenamina believes that women need skills in leadership and information communication technologies to participate fully in the movement for social justice—and she has already started a training program in her region to achieve this vision.

“Life is a gift. A fulfilled life is an achievement. A woman achieving her dreams is a butterfly who learned how to fly in the storm.”


Neema

Democratic Republic of the Congo Neema

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Mentor: Ruth Beedle
Editorial Midwife: Valerie Bagley

Afflicted by polio at the age of two, Neema grew up in one of the worst countries in the world to be a woman-the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Today she works to unite hundreds of thousands of women to bring an agenda of dignity, rights and gender empowerment to the forefront of her nation’s future. As part of her vision, Neema has opened an Information Communications Technology company to give voice to the voiceless and change the global conversation.

"I’m not interested in making a little noise – I’m looking to CHANGE THE PARADIGM!"


Noreens

Palestine noreens

Palestine

Mentor: Pat Finnegan
Editorial Midwife: Rosemary Hannan

As an English-speaking, Palestinian American woman living in an Arab town in Israel, noreens uses her unique perspective and love of writing to break down misconceptions and stereotypes. By writing about Palestinian folktales and Muslim holidays in a local children’s magazine, sharing her personal experiences of being searched at check-points, or relaying the struggles of other Palestineans in her joint Arab-Jewish women’s photography class, noreens brings humanity to the forefront of a decades-long struggle for freedom.

“Knowledge is power, and armed with both, women can cross borders and topple misconceptions, inequality, and injustice. We can make our own demonstrations of change.”


Okeny-Lucia

Kenya Okeny-Lucia

Kenya

Mentor: Mary Ann Morreale
Editorial Midwife: Jana Potter

Okeny-Lucia, a nurse and maternal and child-health advocate, braved the 2km walk from her home in Kibera, Kenya’s largest slum, to help her countrymen and women after violence broke out during the 2007 elections. Realizing that her story and those of countless other nurses and midwives are going untold in her country, Okeny-Lucia works to connect these women with the skills and tools they need in information communications technology to make their voices heard and find the resources they need to reduce maternal mortality.

“I believe if many midwives get to be connected through World Pulse to say their stories, we will make the worst noise until the government hears. No woman must die while seeking for maternal care on time.”


Parwana Fayyaz

Afghanistan Parwana Fayyaz

Afghanistan

Mentor: Ellen Wingard
Editorial Midwife: Farnoosh Fathi

As a child Parwana lived under the gloomy skies of Kabul until she fled with her family to Pakistan where she lived as a refugee for ten years. Today she has overcome difficult odds to become a student at the Asian University for Women, where she is finding her wings and using her voice to build a peaceful future for Afghanistan. Parwana dreams of bringing human rights, peace, and knowledge to women in Afghanistan so that they too can live with hope and confidence, reclaim their freedom and dignity, and rebuild their country.

“I am confident that I am the one who is going to change the Afghan women's world. I am going to write about Afghanistan, Afghan women, Afghan men, Afghan children, and even Afghanistan's nature that will awaken the world to save my country and leave it in peace after decades of war."


Paulina Lawsin

Philippines Paulina Lawsin

Philippines

Mentor: Marta Williams
Editorial Midwife: Jocelyn Edelstein

Reawakening an old dream to become a journalist, Paulina Lawsin is determined to connect the voices of women from the villages of the Philippines with a global audience to help end poverty, violence, and gender inequality. Orphaned at the age of ten, her mother’s spirit guides her on her quest to create just and equitable communities. Paulina trains local people in gender sensitivity, participatory governance and leadership, and has banded together with women all over the country to push for pro-poor and gender sensitive laws and budgets.

“Let the women voices be heard in the villages, at the local centers of power, to the halls of Congress. Together, we will lift each other’s spirits, wipe each other’s tears, cheer at our small victories and sustain our gains in the family, work and community lives.”


Rahel Weldeab

Eritrea Rahel Weldeab

Eritrea

Mentor: Nancy Cosgriff
Editorial Midwife: Debra Engle

Rahel is a young Eritrean woman committed to action. While she appreciates the power of new media and technology to connect a global community, she recognizes the profound digital divide that often keeps grassroots women leaders from being heard. Rahel hopes to serve as a connection between these women and the rest of the world, to help inform, empower, and build peace in her country and region.

“We need to not just spread information and report on the amazing things our mothers have done and continue to do, but to also mobilize young women to take on similar action.”


Redsbird

China redsbird

China

Mentor: Odessa
Editorial Midwife: Lisa Teberg

Born in a small village in southern China, redsbird identifies herself as a daughter, a mother, and a woman. As a journalist for her city newspaper, redsbird is working towards her vision to bring about equality for women in China by writing about women’s perspectives on reproductive rights and gender roles, which are all too often ignored in society. An avid writer on Sina-weibo, a Chinese network akin to Twitter, redsbird believes that inner change and reflection must happen before one can change the world.

“Unity is strength. Web 2.0 makes the unity of women all over the world become possible that was unbelievable [before].”


Ruthibelle

Jamaica ruthibelle

Jamaica

Mentor: Patricia O'Connor
Editorial Midwife: Lois Parshley

As a young girl in a small town in the poorest parish in Jamaica, ruthibelle was raised “having barely to just enough.” At a young age, surrounded by disempowered youth and teenage pregnancy, she felt she lived in darkness. But now, sparked by education, ruthibelle looks at her community and sees solutions. With an insatiable thirst for knowledge and action, she is volunteering, blogging, and building movements as a youth advocate in her country and the world.

“I want to tell precious stories so well that people won’t stop talking, won’t stop thinking, until something happens - something big, something great, something absolutely filled with nobility.”


Sahro

Somalia Sahro

Somalia

Mentor: Catherine Fitzgerald
Editorial Midwife: Jennifer Baljko

After two decades of war in Somalia, Sahro is determined to put conflict resolution and gender equality at the top of the political agenda. She envisions a transformation in Somali mindset; moving away from violence as a solution to one of peace and dialogue. She is currently bringing Somali women together on multiple social media sites to speak out about the need for national and community peace initiatives. She is helping women become agents of change instead of victims of war, and pressuring the government to create a Ministry for Peace and Conflict Transformation.

“There is a need to speak a language of love and harmony that is inclusive of all ethnic groups. There is a need to have more role models and peace builders.”


Stella Paul

India Stella Paul

India

Mentor: Sara Collins
Editorial Midwife: Pushpa Achanta

Enduring the struggle of growing up in northeast India as a girl, Stella survived a childhood of neglect, abuse, and a society that refused to acknowledge her as a woman capable of making positive change. Now a freelance journalist and about to cover the UN Climate Summit in Durban 2011, Stella is telling the stories of marginalized women to a world audience. She focuses on finding solutions to women’s inequality through community-based media, including Web 2.0 and mobile phone journalism.

“These marginalized women of India are actually a rising army of change makers; they are taking micro loans to buy computers, cell phones and start a business; they are laboring with men and demanding equal pay; they are fighting displacement, corruption, domestic violence, and, even elections.”


treasureland

Nigeria treasureland

Nigeria

Mentor: Robin Athey
Editorial Midwife: Laura Stull

Treasureland, from Nigeria, is an ambitious woman who overcame a turbulent and at times violent childhood to turn victimhood into leadership. She has dedicated her life to working tirelessly for the women and girls of Nigeria. Treasureland is proud to contribute to the Millennium Development Goals on poverty alleviation and sustainable development by serving as a youth mentor, by teaching IT and social media skills in rural communities, and by empowering women to stand up for reproductive health rights and fight against the spread of HIV/AIDS and Malaria.

“Web 2.0 bridges the gap between literacy and illiteracy, race and religion, rich and poor, it encourages all women to speak.”


Usha KC

Nepal Usha KC

Nepal

Mentor: Katherine Holt
Editorial Midwife: Anna Sontag

“Girls’ education is like pouring water over sand,” is how Usha describes the environment in her small village in Nepal. Fortunately, her parents ignored the majority opinion and sent Usha to school. Usha refuses to be silenced by violence and discrimination, and yearns to spread the dignity and empowerment that she feels to other women. She wants to become involved in building a women’s global network to change people’s the beliefs that it is OK to oppress women through sexual harassment, lower pay, and withholding of property rights.

“I dream of being a global woman with dignity. I dream of being a woman with a powerful voice. I dream of being a woman with decision making power. This is for me, "the garden of my dreams”.”


Valeria Barbosa de Silva

Brazil Valeria Barbosa de Silva

Brazil

Mentor: Kate Rivera
Editorial Midwife: Thais Moraes

Born in the slums of Rio de Janeiro to an illiterate father and semi-literate mother, Valeria Barbosa da Silva has spent 32 years working with the youth, elderly and families in the favelas helping to create a brighter future. Having been taught by her neighbors to read, Valeria now contributes regularly to her community newspaper dedicated to promoting the voices from Cidade de Deus, Rio de Janeiro’s most infamous slum. Her dream is to create a center for women’s empowerment, providing educational training, psychological support, and guidance so that the women of the slums can live dignified and healthy lives.

“If we are not aware, we are slaves of power. It is a chain that keeps our tongue, hands and feet shackled. Freedom is called information. The passport to peace is communication.”


zoneziwoh

Cameroon zoneziwoh

Cameroon

Mentor: Monica Lehner
Editorial Midwife: Anne Dujmovic

Growing up in Cameroon, zoneziwoh realized she simply could not remain silent when witnessing people living in fear from abuse, imprisonment, and starvation. As a rising citizen journalist, poet, and women’s activist, zoneziwoh is constantly implementing solutions to problems that she runs across. Recently she created a platform on Facebook and Twitter for Cameroonian women to share their personal stories and experiences throughout this year’s October 2011 presidential elections.

“My goal is to rewrite the history of Cameroon with an emphasis on the women who are not afraid of the front line and making positive change.”

Related links:

Voices of Our Future 2012 Vision Mentors

We have launched our first ever World Pulse branded mentoring framework for Voices of Our Future! Building on the generous support and best practices of the Empowerment Institute, World Pulse worked with Ellen Wingard to design a methodology that is focused on creating a transformational partnership that champions, nurtures, catalyzes, challenges and supports Correspondents to achieve their visions for change. We are redefining the traditional notion of mentoring from "power bestowed" to "power from within" because we believe that each of us has what it takes to achieve our dreams within us.

Thank you to all the professional women who are dedicating their time and passion to helping the next generation of grassroots women leaders succeed!


Ellen Wingard

United States Ellen Wingard

Correspondent: Parwana Fayyaz

Ellen Wingard is an early innovator in leadership coaching with 28 years experience working with emerging and senior leaders across the globe. She is dedicated to advancing and promoting the social and economic empowerment of women through social entrepreneurship, intergenerational mentoring and cross cultural partnerships. Ellen is on the faculty to the Institute for Women’s Leadership, a member of the Harvard Kennedy School Womens Leadership Board, author of Enlightened Power: How Women Are Transforming the Practice of Leadership and a board member of World Pulse. Ellen recognizes the power of the Voices of Our Future Program as a vehicle for transformational social change, the empowerment of grassroots leaders and mutual healing for all engaged across borders.


Kate Rivera

United States Kate Rivera

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Correspondent: Valeria Barbosa de Silva


Catherine Fitzgerald

United States Catherine Fitzgerald

Correspondent: Sahro


Patricia O'Connor

United States Patricia O'Connor

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Correspondent: ruthibelle


Jane Wells

United States Jane Wells

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Correspondent: Maddy M.


Sara Collins

United States Sara Collins

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Correspondent: Stella Paul


Kat Haber

United States Kat Haber

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Correspondent: Duda


Monica Lehner

United States Monica Lehner

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Correspondent: zoneziwoh


Sarah Whitten

United States Sarah Whitten

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Correspondent: Hummingbird


Ann O'Fallon

United States Ann O'Fallon

Correspondent: katyrdz


Ruth Beedle

United States Ruth Beedle

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Correspondent: Neema
Correspondent: mlaphimon


Robin Athey

United States Robin Athey

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Correspondent: treasureland


Carol Adams

United States Carol Adams

Correspondent: Aliya Bashir


Nancy Cosgriff

United States Nancy Cosgriff

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Correspondent: Rahel Weldeab


Christie Hardwick

United States Christie Hardwick

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Correspondent: Celine


Paulette Common

United States Paulette Common

Correspondent: malba66


Marta Williams

Spain Marta Williams

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Correspondent: Paulina Lawsin


Elaine Millam

United States Elaine Millam

Correspondent: Monica Clarke


Eileen Page

New Zealand Eileen Page

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Correspondent: Chinemu


Mary Bennett

United States Mary Bennett

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Correspondent: mirette


Judy Kugelmass

United States Judy Kugelmass

Correspondent: MaDube


Shirley Clark

United States Shirley Clark

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Correspondent: lymalin


Amy Kessel

United States Amy Kessel

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Correspondent: Ikirimat


Mary Ann Morreale

United States Mary Ann Morreale

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Correspondent: Okeny-Lucia


Katherine Holt

United States Katherine Holt

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Correspondent: Usha KC


Odessa

United States Odessa

Correspondent: redsbird


Clarice Scriber

United States Clarice Scriber

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Correspondent: nasreenamina


Anjana Pursnani

United States Anjana Pursnani

Correspondent: Juliette Maughan


Pat Finnegan

United States Pat Finnegan

Correspondent: noreens


Virginia Williams

Switzerland Virginia Williams

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Correspondent: amiesissoho

Voices of Our Future 2012 Editorial Midwives

World Pulse has created a network of Editorial Midwifes to champion, nurture, catalyze, challenge and support Voices of Our Future Correspondents throughout the program. Editorial Midwives use their expertise as writers, bloggers and journalists to help Correspondents hone their unique voices and communicate their visions to a global audience.

Thank you to all the professional women who are dedicating their time and passion to helping the next generation of grassroots women leaders succeed!


Sally Hedman

United States Sally Hedman

Correspondent: Juliette Maughan


Farnoosh Fathi

United States Farnoosh Fathi

Correspondent: Parwana Fayyaz


Roz Siegel

United States Roz Siegel

Correspondent: Maddy M.


Lisa Cox

United States Lisa Cox

Correspondent: mlaphimon


Amy Maroney

United States Amy Maroney

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Correspondent: Ikirimat


Abigail Diskin

United States Abigail Diskin

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Correspondent: nasreenamina


Leslie Stoupas

United States Leslie Stoupas

Correspondent: mirette


Jana Potter

United States Jana Potter

Correspondent: Okeny-Lucia


Karoline Kemp

Canada Karoline Kemp

Correspondent: Aliya Bashir


Kristin Miller

United States Kristin Miller

Correspondent: Celine


Emily Brewer

United Kingdom Emily Brewer

Correspondent: Hummingbird


Jinx Faulkner

United States Jinx Faulkner

Correspondent: Chinemu


Anna Sontag

United States Anna Sontag

Visit website »
Correspondent: Usha KC


Nancy Siegel

United Kingdom Julie Tomlin

Correspondent: malba66


Jan Askin

United States Jan Askin

Correspondent: amiesissoho


Rosemary Hannan

Ireland Rosemary Hannan

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Correspondent: noreens


Pushpa Achanta

India Pushpa Achanta

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Correspondent: Stella Paul


Anne Dujmovic

United States Anne Dujmovic

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Correspondent: zoneziwoh


Laura Stull

United States Laura Stull

Correspondent: treasureland


Barbara Bracewell

United States Barbara Bracewell

Correspondent: MaDube


Deb Engle

United States Deb Engle

Visit website »
Correspondent: Rahel Weldeab


Lois Parshley

United States Lois Parshley

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Correspondent: ruthibelle


Jocelyn Edelstein

United States Jocelyn Edelstein

Correspondent: Paulina Lawsin


Michelle Coburn

South Africa Michelle Coburn

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Correspondent: Monica Clarke


Valerie Bagley

United States Valerie Bagley

Correspondent: Neema


Leslie Parrilla

United States Leslie Parrilla

Correspondent: katyrdz


Thais Moraes

Brazil Thais Moraes

Visit website »
Correspondent: Valeria Barbosa da Silva


Caitlyn Henry

Australia Caitlyn Henry

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Correspondent: lymalin


Jennifer Baljko

Spain Jennifer Baljko

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Correspondent: Sahro


Lisa Teberg

United States Lisa Teberg

Correspondent: redsbird


Elizabeth Fautsch

United States Elizabeth Fautsch

Correspondent: Duda

World Pulse LIVE 2012

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THANK YOU to our entire World Pulse community — both long-time supporters and our new friends — for providing a warm and rousing welcome to World Pulse's 2012 awarding winning journalists — Hummingbird, Neema and Stella! This year's national tour crossed the US twice, touching down in 4 cities so that these grassroots leaders could share their stories, insights, and visions at 18+ forums and gatherings. While they have flown home, they have taken our hearts with them and built lasting connections that will cross all boundaries.

In gratitude for your partnership!

The World Pulse team

EXPERIENCE World Pulse LIVE

September 20 – October 9, 2012

New York City, NY / Portland, OR / Washington, DC / Atlanta, GA

New York, NY
September 20-25

9/20 - United Nations Forum
Invitation only

9/21 - NYU-SCPS Center for Global Affairs

9/22 - Meet and Greet Salon
Invitation only

9/24 - Clinton Global Initiative Forum
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Portland, OR
September 26-30

9/26 - Mercy Corps

9/27 - Intel Forum
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9/28 - City Club of Portland
LISTEN » WATCH »

9/29 - Meet and Greet Salon
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Washington, DC
October 1-3

10/1 - Meet and Greet Salon
Invitation only

10/2 - La Voix de l'Amérique (Voice of America) LISTEN » (in French)

10/2 - Gender Roundtable
Invitation only

10/3 - U.S. Department of State Global Webchat WATCH » - LIVE on Oct. 3

10/3 - U.S. Department of State Forum
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Atlanta, GA
October 4-9

10/8 - CNN Interview WATCH »

10/9 - The W Hotel — Midtown

Watch the Magic of the 2011 Tour


CONNECT with the Correspondents
A Voice for Revolution in the World's Worst Place to Be a Woman

Neema Namadamu

Democratic Republic of the Congo DR Congo

“I don’t want to make a little noise—I want to change the paradigm!”

Afflicted by polio since the age of two, Neema grew up in the Eastern Congo, a region ravaged by an epidemic of sexual violence and war. Today she is an outspoken, tech-savvy woman mobilizing and empowering scores of women, including women with disabilities, to change the future of her nation. A determined visionary, she is also pushing to establish a national communication network to better connect rural Congolese people to the world.

Expertise: Disabled Rights, Environmental Protection, Peace Building in Conflict, Indigenous Rights, Internet Communications Technology

A Voice for Change in the Middle East

Hummingbird

Syria Syria

"It is never too late to stop the damage. Together we can save the children of Syria."

As her country sinks into deepening violence and family members disappear, Hummingbird has broken through fear to find her voice. A member of Syria's Kurdish minority, she calls for an end to the horrors of a war where children are massacred in the streets by government forces. Her dream is to use digital media to transform Syria by unleashing women's concealed aspirations and wisdom to awaken the world to alternate paths to the nightmare unfolding across her country.

Expertise: Human Rights, Digital Media, Women’s Economic Empowerment, Ethnic Minority Rights

A Voice for the Rising Power of Women in India

Stella Paul

India India

"The women of India are a rising army of change makers, taking microloans to buy cell phones and start businesses, and fighting displacement, corruption, and environmental degradation."

Growing up in impoverished Northeast India, Stella barely survived as an unwanted girl child. Now, braving kidnappings and threats, she is telling the stories of marginalized women to a world audience and training women to find their voices and tell their own stories. For her, community-based media and citizen journalism are transformational keys to ending women's inequality.

Expertise: Climate Change, Food Security, Sustainable Development, Rural Empowerment, Conflict, Appropriate Technology, and Innovation


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Thank you to our hosts and in-kind partners!

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City Club of Portland

Mercy Corps

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NYU-SCPS Center for Global Affairs

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Krystee Sidwell, LMT

U.S. Department of State

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Women Thrive Worldwide

Photos: Andrea Leoncavallo

Voices of Our Future 2010

2010 Global Correspondents

We invite you to view an interactive map of our Correspondents, or read their profiles below.


AchiengNas

Uganda AchiengNas

Uganda

Mentor: Kat Haber
Editorial Midwife: Becki Roberts

Pioneer. Fighter. Mother. Achieng knows what it means to follow a dream. She has pioneered the use of Internet communication technology to respond to Uganda’s HIV/AIDS crisis, which has ravaged her own family and left her with 17 orphaned nephews and nieces. Knowing the importance of education, she sponsors the school fees of several nieces to give them the opportunity for a brighter future. Achieng is committed to turning around the lives of youth in her community and in her country and giving them the tools they need to make a difference.

"I believe everybody has the potential to live a better life. Given the opportunity, education and motivation ANYONE can become someone admirable.”


AmaniK

Kenya Amani K

Kenya

Mentor: Nancy Siegel
Editorial Midwife: Marissa Brodney

AmaniK struggles against the rising tide of political violence in Kenya and the increasing numbers of HIV/AIDS orphans in her community on a daily basis. She works tirelessly to promote non-violence and peace education programs throughout Africa, advocates for the rights of girls and women, and has created the first ever Women’s International Grassroots Peace Congress in east Africa. AmaniK is forging strong networks of grassroots women who are tackling pan-African issues, crafting viable solutions to poverty and bringing about social change.

“My goal is to inspire others to reach down inside themselves to find the place where 'Peace' resides—and once found, to stretch out and share it with others.”


Amei

Maldives Amei

Maldives

Mentor: Elaine Millam
Editorial Midwife: Lisa St. John

An adventurer and evolving soul from the island nation of the Maldives, Amei struggled under the yoke of overwhelming responsibilities to family, friends, and community until she said “enough!” She was given the opportunity to travel abroad, and left her comfort zone and familiar identity for an unknown adventure. Amei has used Web 2.0 to connect herself with women around the world and to create a platform where she feels empowered and able to freely express herself. She wants to use the power of Web 2.0 to tell the stories of those in her community who do not have access to technology and to work towards the development of her island nation.

“I am not sure of the future but I am adamant not to let history repeat itself. I am willing to commit myself to educate and work with others who have similar passion, values, and motivation to realize a dream.”


Bounce

Zimbabwe Bounce

Zimbabwe

Mentor: Mary Bennett
Editorial Midwife: Jinx Faulkner

Living in a country ravaged by AIDS, and political and economic meltdown, Jacqueline guides young people through a process of self-discovery and self-respect through Kufunda Learning Villlage, a learning community and demonstration village on the outskirts of Harare. She believes in the power of stories of resilience, respect, and love and is using her writing to tell the world about the strength and beauty of Africa, of ordinary people and the “art of the possible”.

“I want to make visible the forgotten stories, the hidden stories that show that dreams are alive, that we believe in a future.”


ccholai

Papua New Guinea ccholai

Papua New Guinea

Mentor: Linda Lubin
Editorial Midwife: Sonia Lowman

Coming from a region suffering from alcoholism and early pregnancy, Carole sees IT as a tool for addressing these issues and empowering women. Recognizing that she is one of the more privileged in terms of access to internet services, she hopes to create an e-information center in her province to address the lack of knowledge and education, and connect women to technology. Her vision is for women to be enabled to speak out, and better themselves, their families and their livelihoods.

“I hope that the more we interact with people outside of our society, and other developing countries and developed countries, we will gain an understanding of how people do things and how support can be given to people, so that we can break these barriers.”


Emie Zozobrado

Philippines Emie Zozobrado

Philippines

Mentor: Ruth Beedle
Editorial Midwife: Anna Sontag

One of seven children, Emilia lived under the weight of martial law in the Philippines, facing long lines to buy rice and sharing her home, clothes, and what little her family had with refugees from the conflict. She now works for the government’s sustainable community development and peace-building efforts to ensure that millions of other little girls living in poverty and hunger have an opportunity to find their way out and up.

“Women have the amazing magic touch that have nurtured the male specie into heroes, kings, and leaders since time immemorial. If women can deliver power to this world, we have the source of power within us.”


Farona

Saudi Arabia Farona

Saudi Arabia

Mentor: Maura Conlon-McIvor
Editorial Midwife: Jana Potter

Born and raised in Saudi Arabia by parents from Bangladesh and Pakistan, Farhaa’s childhood was filled with questions about identity and struggles against racism. Every morning, she gets up and looks in the mirror to remind herself that she is a woman and a woman of color. Farhaa doesn’t waste much time talking about problems and seeks to bring communities together through positive connections, storytelling, and shared achievements. She envisions a world where women of any economic class can hold public office and be part of the decision making process in her country.

“I am stunned to find women engaging and communicating with other women not based on class but courage, not based on employment or education status but on energy and enthusiasm. With World Pulse I feel pure optimism in my heart and happiness in my hair!”


Fungai Machirori

Zimbabwe Fungai Machriori

Zimbabwe

Mentor: Pat Finnegan
Editorial Midwife: Jan Askin

Fungai discovered her personal confidence through writing—and a gift for telling intimate stories of pain, endurance, and victory normally unheard in traditional media. An avid blogger, she takes on taboo subjects deemed too shocking for mainstream audiences, such as domestic violence, sexual and reproductive rights, and AIDS’s impact on women in her country. Her vision for her life is to be “an incandescent light shining out of the darkness of ignorance,” and to spread her knowledge of Web 2.0 and writing to other women in her community.

“I have a voice and I will always and forever use it. Listen to it in my words—it is strong, bold, beautiful. Nothing will take it away from me.”


Harmony

Ivory Coast Harmony

Ivory Coast

Mentor: Patricia O'Connor
Editorial Midwife: Lydia Holden

Growing up in a rare household where her father cherished and respected her as much as her brothers provided Armelle with an understanding of what can be accomplished when men are supporters and equal partners in women’s empowerment. Working with rural women and men in the Ivory Coast, she strives to educate women and girls, building self-confidence and addressing HIV/AIDS in her community.

“I want to praise those men giving us the place we deserve, fighting for our wellbeing, they are in the dark, pushing us as they can. Nobody see them. You will never hear them or feel their presence. But they do stand beside us and whisper ‘go ahead, you can make it.’”


Iffat Gill

Pakistan Iffat Gill

Pakistan

Mentor: Vera Salter
Editorial Midwife: Lisa Teberg

In 2009, after dealing with traumatic and difficult family circumstances, Iffat entered into a year of silence and despair. But the pool of talented and brave women of PulseWire inspired her to wake up from her year of hibernation and writers’ block and she is now once again energetically engaged in her work as a youth activist and founder of the People’s Development Organization, a youth rights non-profit based in the Punjab Province of Pakistan. Iffat’s vision for her future is to design innovative and groundbreaking solutions to empower women living in poverty, dependence, solitude, or shame.

“I feel I have woken up from a long slumber and am ready for a fresh start, knowing I now have friends all over the world who are actually listening to me! This feeling of wakefulness, sharing, and emotional caressing is more than what I can ask for.”


Insha Allah

Burma Insha Allah

Burma

Mentor: Barbara Heller
Editorial Midwife: Lisa Cox

Growing up in a country where political freedom and democracy have been brutally and frequently oppressed, Insha Allah chose to become a humanitarian aid worker to bring development to her fellow countrymen and women. In 2008, she and several friends established Metta Moe Myanmar, an organization whose vision is to create change agents and sustainable development through youth education and activism.

“I believe we all can struggle these burdens together and are capable of making a positive change which will create a better future for all of us and the reputation of our mother land.”


Laura Golakeh

Liberia Laura Golakeh

Liberia

Mentor: Judy Kugelmass
Editorial Midwife: Laura Stull

Born during Liberia’s first civil war, Laura saw friends and family die from hunger and violence at an early age. Vowing never to let her country return to those dark days, she has become an advocate for young women in her community who suffer from drug addiction, sexual assault, and hopelessness. As Laura says, “You can break a single stick, but not a bunch of sticks.” She works towards creating a community which breeds strong, inspiring, and influential women, and views her advocacy on PulseWire as part of the process to create a healthy generation of young African women.

“I want to tell my story to millions of young women out there who are coming from such background and do not know their way out. I want to tell them there is always light at the end of the tunnel. I want them to be inspired by my story.”


Leina

Cameroon Leina

Cameroon

Mentor: Usha Sharma
Editorial Midwife: Alice Wood

As a female journalist, Leina was often subjected to workplace gender-discrimination and was forced out of more than one job. Her dream is to create a media center for the women of Cameroon where articles, radio spots and video documentaries on gender based violence, including the noxious traditional practices widows are subjected to, are broadcast nationally and online to alert the world of the plight of these women while also searching for solutions. Leina has built a network of trust with female victims of domestic violence and hopes to continue to tell their stories and hers, letting all women know that hope is not lost—our voices must be heard.

“My dream is to one day have the opportunity to reach out to thousands of women worldwide whose voices have been shut by the vices of culture. A former patient can make an excellent doctor.”


Martha Llano

Colombia Martha Llano

Colombia

Mentor: Nancy Cosgriff
Editorial Midwife: Angela Uherbelau

Struggling with the loss of her father at an early age, Martha rediscovered her home and her happiness at 7,500 feet above sea level in the cloud forests of Colombia. In each person she met in her new home, she discovered love, tenderness, and faith and learned how to build a new family. With her love of nature, Martha founded Sentir, a non-profit organization dedicated to the protection of endangered ecosystems and sustainable development for vulnerable communities. She envisions each woman reconnecting with her feminine pulse to heal ourselves, the planet, and to achieve our dreams.

“To be able to change we need to forget, to forgive, to heal our hearts, and our souls. To be able to change we must embrace change as if today was the first day to change. We have to be willing to come out of our comfort zone and leave behind all our fears.”


Marvah Shakib

Afghanistan marvah.shakib

Afghanistan

Mentor: Isisara Bey
Editorial Midwife: Maura Bogue

The only girl in her middle-class Afghan family, Marvah had to sneak past Taliban officials to attend the neighborhood school her mother established in secret. Seeing the suffering of women around her, including child marriages and crippling poverty, Marvah has dared to take a step and raise her voice for her country. Believing that knowledge is power, Marvah wants to see an overhaul of Afghanistan’s education system, including establishing gender-sensitive curricula in high schools, more schools in rural areas, and more women’s universities. She hopes that one day Muslim women will be equal decision makers within the family, society, and the world.

“World Pulse is like a gate between two worlds: One world is dark and I can’t see where to go and I have no guide to help me reach my goal; the other world is full of light and I can learn by asking questions to people who will guide me and help me step toward my dreams and make them real.”


Mei Li

United States Mei Li

United States

Mentor: LeTonia Jones
Editorial Midwife: Sana Saeed

Having lost her corporate job due to discrimination because of her sexual orientation, Melissa chose to see the hurdle as a blessing in disguise. She now focuses on combining her passion for teaching yoga, meditation, and organic gardening and is in the process of creating her own non-profit organization. She strives to foster creativity, empowerment, and organic growth for the queer community and beyond.

“I love empowering women who are scared even of their own voices that have been lost so long, and helping them learn to sing and express again, and always.”


Mursal Hamraz

Afghanistan Mursal Hamraz

Afghanistan

Mentor: Piper Anderson
Editorial Midwife: Rebecca Weaver

Finding courage and her voice through her studies at the Asian University of Women and her participation with World Pulse, Mursal discovered a deep desire to bring out women’s talents and voices in her own country. Debilitated by 30 years of war and oppression, only 12% of Afghan women are literate. Mursal seeks to address this problem by creating her own non-governmental organization that tackles both the educational and economic aspects of poverty and brings voice to the voiceless women of Afghanistan.

“It is human beings who empower other human beings, and so it is women who empower other women. We can be as strong as anyone in the world, but the only thing we need is unity.”


NI NI AYE

Burma Ni Ni Aye

Burma

Mentor: Debra Lach
Editorial Midwife: Roz Siegel

As a dedicated teacher in a nation where freedom of information is nearly nonexistent, Ni Ni Aye is passionate about bringing ideas to fruition in the classroom and in the community. Struggling against the severe restrictions placed on internet access by Burma’s military junta, Ni Ni Aye seeks to create bridges between her community and the outside world through Web 2.0. At the same time, she is working to create an organization for women that will provide legal support for human rights abuses and social support and training on how to raise their voices.

“When I teach, it is not just teaching. My students are learning and thinking at the same time. They are trying to find the cause and solution for world problems, all while bringing their ideas to life.”


Nilima

Nepal Nilima

Nepal

Mentor: Tami Briggs
Editorial Midwife: Sarah Meyer

When Nilima was born, her mother was expelled from their house in a small Nepali village by her grandfather, who thought that having a girl child was a disgrace. Her early struggle imbued her with a sense of determination that she has used to develop her community and promote women’s rights—from helping collect funds to build a school, to fighting against her best friend’s forced marriage at the age of 15. Today, Nilima uses her knowledge and passion to educate young girls about their reproductive rights and encourage them to continue their education.

“The journey—from a frustrating struggle to walk with the world to this place—where I am making a different walk for the world, was breathtakingly difficult, yet I am much satisfied where I am today with the success I have got.”


Rudzanimbilu

South Africa Rudzanimbilu

South Africa

Mentor: Cindy Bishop
Editorial Midwife: Amy Maroney

Working from the tiny room that serves as her living room and study by day, and bedroom for her and her two children at night, Rudzambilu defies a culture which would have her fail for being a single mother and a woman. She has tackled poverty since the age of 14 when she founded her own non-governmental organization, and envisions creating a free training and information hub for women and girls in her community.

“World Pulse has given me a part of my life back. I know now that I can redirect my focus and I can stand and be counted and I will achieve something bigger than me. Yes, it's hard but I can raise my children and be proud. I know there is nothing wrong with me.”


Ruun Abdi

Somalia Ruun Abdi

Somalia

Mentor: Eunice Valentine
Editorial Midwife: Pushpa Achanta

Ruun’s family encouraged her to pursue her education, despite the challenges of growing up in a country racked by civil war and violence. She persevered to become the only woman in her high school class to graduate with top marks and went on to earn degrees in telecommunications engineering, community development, and social work. Ruun works to strengthen the role of women in peace-building, and continues to encourage young women to pursue higher education.

“I can see and smell the change waves through web 2.0. We will never be defeated unless we admit it, we should keep going and there is no turning back.”


Sahar

Yemen Sahar

Yemen

Mentor: Beth Johnson
Editorial Midwife: Morgan Garcia

A Yemeni woman, Sahar is a humanitarian aid worker focused on assisting refugee women and children overcome poverty and addressing gender-based violence in her country. An informal diplomat, she overcomes stereotypes of Muslim women by reaching out to audiences around the world, replacing myths with facts. She has enabled audiences in the US to change their perceptions of Yemen, and of her, from “that girl with the headscarf” to “Sahar, the Yemeni woman.” She is dedicated to the development of her country and the self-empowerment of women.

“Moreover, I saw myself as a traveler, roaming the universe, seeking and providing knowledge. I still recall what one of my teachers said about me: ‘You are United Nations.’”


Sapnashahani

India Sapnashahani

India

Mentor: Dorothy Orszulak
Editorial Midwife: Caitlyn Henry

Raised by her mother in Bombay while her father worked aboard a ship captain for most of the year, Sapna was vocal about issues of gender inequality from an early age. The apathy of her middle class neighbors to the abject poverty around them also caught her attention and she decided to use her training in media to empower the voiceless around her. She established Women Aloud Videoblogging (WAVE) in 2009, a unique digital platform for Indian women to voice their perspectives on issues that matter through video blogs. Sapna’s ultimate vision for WAVE is to establish a pan-Indian, women-led TV channel that airs high-quality, creative, educational, and inspiring programs for and about the NGO sector in India.

“Participating in Voices of Our Future will boost my self-confidence and provide me with a nurturing new community of like-minded doers.”


Sarvina

Cambodia Sarvina

Cambodia

Mentor: Monica Lehner
Editorial Midwife: Elizabeth Fautsch

The only literate person in an extended family of 35, Sarvina has overcome poverty to become a leader in her community. She seeks to address gender inequalities and violence against women in her rural village through increased access to education and economic development. Sarvina recently carried out human rights training in her village, and is already seeing a change in attitudes and behaviors, including more girls going to school and a reduction in domestic violence. Her vision is to have a community of women who are empowered to stand up for their rights and are equal participants in society.

“Through World Pulse I have received so many inspired ideas and encouraging comments, which has helped me find my footing and become stronger so I can make changes in my village. I have just started walking to my goal and when I feel stuck, I can turn to World Pulse for solutions and learn from all these powerful women from around the world.”


SAsong

Cameroon SAsong

Cameroon

Mentor: Marcie Lesnick-Taylor
Editorial Midwife: Tara Gilligan

Sharon believes that each of us has the power to affect change. An immigrant from Cameroon to the United States, she uses her talents to draw together a tapestry of immigrant women’s experiences around the world through her Threads of Our Fabric Project. Having come through the rough process of adopting a new country, culture, and language, Sharon plans on starting a program for recently immigrated adolescent girls, creating a space for them to address important identity and cultural issues and to be themselves.

“Free to be me—that is my vision for my life, community, and the world. Women and girls emboldened to dream, create, live, and inspire.”


SLaw

Nigeria SLaw

Nigeria

Mentor: Carol Adams
Editorial Midwife: Julie Tomlin

Overcoming corruption, strikes, and weeks without electricity, Slaw dares to dream about happy endings. Driven by her conviction that “every human being is a treasure worthy of love,” she uses Web 2.0 to connect with communities across Nigeria to galvanize youth into action for the restoration of a just and compassionate society.

“Through World Pulse, I intend to reach the farthest corners of the earth to find listeners for the 45-million unheard voices of the youth in Nigeria.”


tainadelsol

United States tainadelsol

United States

Mentor: Colleen Durkin
Editorial Midwife: Gretchen Lee

Dayanara is a devoted single mother and the executive director of Casa Atabex Ache, an organization focused on the self-empowerment and collective transformation of women of color through holistic and alternative healing techniques. She is dedicated to creating a space for young women to reclaim the power of their minds, bodies, and spirits. Dayanara envisions using Voices of Our Future to help break the silence of the women around her, and to connect the spiritual aspect of change with the social justice movement in Afro-Latina communities.

“I am excited to see how I can bring Web 2.0 to young women globally so that they don’t internalize the oppression and violence they face every day and instead start their healing and transformational journeys as early as possible.”


Thais Moraes

Brazil Thais Moraes

Brazil

Mentor: Sarah Whitten-Grigsby
Editorial Midwife: Ayobami Famurewa

Growing up middle class, 19-year-old Thais does not hide behind the walls of her life in Brazil, but instead struck out into the surrounding impoverished community to dedicate her time and energy to teaching underprivileged children. As a G(irls) 20 Summit delegate, Thais has demonstrated her commitment to empowering girls and women around the world. She has made the struggle to put more women in decision-making positions personally and is studying to become a lawyer.

“I want to use this space as a platform to denounce violations on the rights of women that often go unnoticed and to expose and share globally possible solutions that have been used in my country.”


Vivian

Nigeria Vivian

Nigeria

Mentor: Constance Haqq
Editorial Midwife: Jocelyn Edelstein

From a childhood darkened by abuse to a young woman suffering with serious health problems, Vivian has emerged onto the world stage as a passionate educator of women’s health issues. With her years of experience researching and working in areas of reproductive/sexual health and life building skills, Vivian authored a book at the age of 24—Healthy Approach Towards HIV/AIDS, Prevention, Care, and Support—and has not slowed down since. Vivian’s vision is to create a youth friendly center to help girls who have been abused and to develop a community magazine called About Her which will focus on women and girl’s health awareness, education, and empowerment.

“It is one thing to run, it is another to be a runner. I want to be a runner for the Voice of Our Future program to establish a platform for women and girls to learn, be empowered, educated, connected, and happy.”


Warona

Botswana Warona

Botswana

Mentor: Natalie Safir
Editorial Midwife: Kristin Miller

Warona decries the virus and rampant alcoholism that threatens to destroy her small mining community in Botswana, a country with one of the highest rates of HIV/AIDS in the world. Warona has faced her own struggles—from watching her mother die from poisoning, to searching high and low for a doctor who would operate on her new-born daughters deformed foot so that she might live a normal life. She now seeks to mentor poverty-stricken mothers in her community and to help them develop small businesses so that they do not have to turn to prostitution to earn a living. Her vision is to see HIV/AIDS eradicated and the poor and underprivileged of her nation taken care of.

“The suffering of women in my community made me rise up to seek help. It is my duty to educate myself and acquire boldness so I can talk for my people. With World Pulse, I know I can do it. If we share our knowledge, I believe my country will become uplifted and our communities will be educated. Then, my land will be healed.”

Voices of Our Future 2010 Vision Mentors

World Pulse is honored to partner with the Empowerment Institute for the mentoring portion of the program. The 30 mentors are generously donating their time and talent to support, guide, and empower their correspondent to address her challenges and reach her goals.


Gail Straub

United States Gail Straub

Visit website »

Gail Straub co-founded Empowerment Training Programs in 1981. Since then she has offered training to thousands of people throughout America, Europe, Russia, China, Africa, and East Asia. She co-directs the Empowerment Institute Certification Program, a school for transformative leadership. Gail's tireless commitment to global women's empowerment and her natural ability to think big brought the mentoring portion of Voices of Our Future to life.


Eunice Valentine

United States Eunice Valentine

Correspondent: Ruun Abdi


Dorothy Orszulak

United States Dorothy Orszulak

Visit website »
Correspondent: Sapna Shahani


Patricia O'Connor

United States Patricia O'Connor

Visit website »
Correspondent: HARMONY


LeTonia Jones

United States LeTonia Jones

Visit website »
Correspondent: Mei Li


Linda Lubin

United States Linda Lubin

Visit website »
Correspondent: ccholai


Marcie Lesnick-Taylor

United States Marcie Lesnick-Taylor

Visit website »
Correspondent: SAsong


Monica Lehner

United States Monica Lehner

Visit website »
Correspondent: Sarvina


Sarah Whitten-Grigsby

United States Sarah Whitten-Grigsby

Visit website »
Correspondent: Thais Moraes


Usha Sharma

United States Usha Sharma

Visit website »
Correspondent: Leina


Ruth Beedle

United States Ruth Beedle

Visit website »
Correspondent: Emie Zozobrado


Barbara Heller

United States Barbara Heller

Correspondent: Insha Allah


Carol Adams

United States Carol Adams

Correspondent: SLaw


Nancy Cosgriff

United States Nancy Cosgriff

Visit website »
Correspondent: martha llano


Nancy Siegel

United States Nancy Siegel

Visit website »
Correspondent: Amani K


Vera Salter

United States Vera Salter

Correspondent: Iffat Gill


Natalie Safir

United States Natalie Safir

Visit website »
Correspondent: warona


Elaine Millam

United States Elaine Millam

Correspondent: Amei


Cindy Bishop

United States Cindy Bishop

Correspondent: Rudzanimbilu


Mary Bennett

United States Mary Bennett

Visit website »
Correspondent: bounce


Judy Kugelmass

United StatesJudy Kugelmass

Correspondent: Laura Golakeh


Maura Conlon-McIvor

United States Maura Conlon-McIvor

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Correspondent: Farona


Colleen Durkin

United States Colleen Durkin

Visit website »
Correspondent: tainadelsol


Constance Haqq

United StatesConstance Haqq

Correspondent: vivian


image

United StatesDebra Lach

Visit website »
Correspondent: NI NI AYE


Tami Briggs

United StatesTami Briggs

Visit website »
Correspondent: nilima


Isisara Bey

United StatesIsisara Bey

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Correspondent: marvah.shakib


Kat Haber

United StatesKat Haber

Visit website »
Correspondent: AchiengNas


Pat Finnegan

United States Pat Finnegan

Correspondent: Fungai Machirori


Piper Anderson

United States Piper Anderson

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Correspondent: Mursal Hamraz


Beth Johnson

United States Beth Johnson

Correspondent: sahar

Voices of Our Future 2010 Editorial Midwives


Lydia Holden

United States Lydia Holden

Correspondent: HARMONY


Morgan Garcia

United States Morgan Garcia

Correspondent: Sahar


Roz Siegel

United States Roz Siegel

Correspondent: NI NI AYE


Lisa Cox

United States Lisa Cox

Correspondent: Insha Allah


Amy Maroney

United States Amy Maroney

Visit website »
Correspondent: Rudzanimbilu


Sonia Lowman

United States Sonia Lowman

Correspondent: ccholai


Elizabeth Fautsch

United States Elizabeth Fautsch

Correspondent: Sarvina


Jana Potter

United States Jana Potter

Correspondent: Farona


Sarah Meyer

Kenya Sarah Meyer

Visit website »
Correspondent: Nilima


Kristin Miller

United States Kristin Miller

Correspondent: Warona


Ayobami Famurewa

Nigeria Ayobami Famurewa

Correspondent: Thais Moraes


Jinx Faulkner

United States Jinx Faulkner

Correspondent: bounce


Anna Sontag

United States Anna Sontag

Correspondent: Emie Zozobrado


Nancy Siegel

United Kingdom Julie Tomlin

Correspondent: SLaw


Jan Askin

United States Jan Askin

Correspondent: Fungai Machirori


Lisa St. John

United States Lisa St. John

Correspondent: Amei


Pushpa Achanta

India Pushpa Achanta

Correspondent: Ruun Abdi


Becki Roberts

United States Becki Robets

Correspondent: AchiengNas


Laura Stull

United States Laura Stull

Correspondent: Laura Golakeh


Rebecca Weaver

United StatesRebecca Weaver

Correspondent: Mursal Hamraz


Marissa Brodney

United States Marissa Brodney

Correspondent: Amani K


Gretchen Lee

United StatesGretchen Lee

Correspondent: tainadelsol


Jocelyn Edelstein

United StatesJocelyn Edelstein

Correspondent: Vivian


Angela Uherbelau

United StatesAngela Uherbelau

Correspondent: martha llano


Alice Wood

United StatesAlice Wood

Correspondent: Leina


Maura Bogue

United StatesMaura Bogue

Correspondent: marvah.shakib


Tara Gilligan

United StatesTara Gilligan

Correspondent: SAsong


Caitlyn Henry

Australia Caitlyn Henry

Correspondent: sapnashahani


Sana Saeed

United States Sana Saeed

Correspondent: Mei Li


Lisa Teberg

United States Lisa Teberg

Correspondent: Iffat Gill

World Pulse LIVE 2011

World Pulse Live

JOIN US in welcoming World Pulse’s award-winning Voices of Our Future citizen journalists as they inspire audiences across the nation.

This October, three amazing women representing the energy and optimism of the World Pulse community will come to the US for the first time to lift their voices. These grassroots leaders will reveal how they are using the power of new media and technology to change lives and create solutions on the frontlines of today’s most pressing issues.

We invite you to come together for an unforgettable experience and celebrate the rising movement of women transforming our world.

MEET the Voices of Our Future Awardees


Martha Llano

Martha Llano
Colombia Colombia
“I want to make a network in every country and bring changes in people’s lives. The power of words is the key to shake the world.”
Martha Llano


Beatrice Achieng

Beatrice Achieng
Uganda Uganda
“I am grateful I found not only a channel but listeners too. I will speak for change to my very last breath.”
Beatrice Achieng


Sarvina

Sarvina Kang
Cambodia Cambodia
“I believe we can harness technology to inspire and empower women worldwide, building their inner strength with skills that will last a lifetime.”
Sarvina Kang

Due to unforeseen challenges, Shekina is not able to join World Pulse LIVE.

ABOUT the Voices of Our Future Awardees

Martha Llano
Seven thousand feet above sea level in the cloud forests of Colombia, Martha Llano is raising her voice for local communities and fragile ecosystems. In a country terrorized by the drug war, where avoiding land mines and witnessing violence against women is a daily occurrence, she is bravely standing up for the land she loves.

Expertise: environmental protection/sustainable development, indigenous and ethnic people’s displacement; violence against women, peace building in Colombia, forgiveness through writing

PulseWire icon Connect with Martha Llano on PulseWire

Beatrice Achieng
Winning a historic tribal ruling in her village allowing women to own land was just the beginning for Beatrice Achieng. A youth leader for her community of over 700,000, Beatrice advances solutions for grassroots development, supports education for local girls, and pioneers the use of information and communication technologies to combat Uganda's HIV/AIDS crisis.

Expertise: HIV/AIDS, girls' education, youth empowerment, information and communication technologies for development

PulseWire icon Connect with Beatrice Achieng on PulseWire

Sarvina Kang
At 10 years old, she was told she would never amount to anything more than a prostitute. Now the only literate person in an extended family of 35—Sarvina has overcome poverty to become a leader in her community and a champion of girls' education and ending sex trafficking.

Expertise: education, girls’ empowerment, sex trafficking

PulseWire icon Connect with Sarvina Kang on PulseWire

With thanks to our generous World Pulse sponsors:

IntelCalvertEILEEN FISHERDr. Hauschka

Intel, the Intel logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other Countries.

Hosts and in-kind partners:

Nan Crawford, Speaking Coach | The Paley Center for Media | BIONEERS | Institute for Women's Leadership | Mercy Corps Action Center | Portland State University's Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Black Studies Department | Krystee Sidwell, LMT | Stanford Social Innovation Review | U.S. Department of State | Women Thrive Worldwide | University of Denver | Pax World Investments | Pambiche

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SAVE THE DATE

October 5-20, 2011

Portland, OR

October 5
Portland State University
RSVP »

October 6
Mercy Corps
RSVP »

Denver, CO

October 11
University of Denver
RSVP »

Bay Area, CA

October 13
Innovation Forum: Technology Leaders Empowering Women
Invitation Only

October 14
Bioneers Conference
Conference Participants Only »

New York City, NY

October 18
The Paley Center for Media
RSVP »

Washington, D.C.

October 20
US Department of State
Global Digital Broadcast »
7:30 - 9:00 am EDT
(On Oct. 20: Select the "Enter as a Guest" option and type in your
name. No password is necessary.)

Details Subject to Change

FOLLOW the Tour!

email icon Sign up for our mailing list to be updated on event details.

PulseWire icon Engage with Martha, Beatrice, and Sarvina as they prepare to speak to US audiences for the first time.

Twitter Follow @worldpulse on Twitter

Facebook Like World Pulse on Facebook

Voices of Our Future 2009

Voices of Our Future 2009

Voices of Our Future: Web 2.0, Citizen Journalism and Empowerment Training Program

Voices of Our Future is an online training program investing in women's ability to use new technology and media to share their stories and innovative solutions with the world.

World Pulse and program partners the Press Institute, the OpEd Project, and the Empowerment Institute provide training in web 2.0, citizen journalism and mentoring to empower a new generation of grassroots women leaders to raise their voices, promote their visions for change and become leaders for their communities.

Meet three of our 2009 Correspondents in person!
In November, Jacqueline from Bolivia, Malayapinas from the Philippines, and Sunita from Nepal, will be coming to the United States in to join World Pulse’s media and speaking tour. To find out if the tour is coming to a location near you, please visit the Tour Homepage.

To read our 2009 Final Program Report, click here

2009 Global Correspondents


Arda

Palestine Arda

Palestine

Mentor: Pat O'Connor
Editorial Midwives: Francie Wenner, Sally Hedman

Arda prepares daily for the possibilities of school bombings, killings, and families torn apart. In such a world, there is one constant: injustice. As a correspondent, Arda writes from her soul to inspire other women in conflict zones to shine their light on women's rights and to live without bitterness.

"World Pulse is my extended family. This is where I draw inspiration. . from women . . . who are only getting better; angry yes, crazy perhaps, but never bitter."


busayo

Nigeria busayo

Nigeria

Mentor: Amy Lombardo
Editorial Midwives: Emily Miller, Karthika Mohan

One of seven children born to illiterate parents, Busayo overcame violence to fulfill her dream to receive a good education. Now 44, Busayo is a guidance counselor handling myriad rape, assault, and sexual-harassment cases. Each case strengthens her resolve to pursue her passion: weaving a world safe for women and girls.

"When women are put in their rightful position, the world becomes a beautiful place to live in."


cad_communication

Zimbabwe cad_communication

Zimbabwe

Mentor: Carol Adams
Editorial Midwives: Gretchen Lee, Carly Diaz

Growing up in the dusty streets of a high density suburb in Mutare, Zimbabwe, Gertrude noticed early on how the women around her were nearly voiceless and had no control over their lives. Today, amidst severe government crackdowns and press restrictions, she bravely trains women and girls on how to use participatory communication to drive their own development, fight for their sexuality and communications rights, and create long-term social change.

“I will narrate the unheard stories of women in Zimbabwe and build local networks of women to create laws that truly reflect our aspirations.”

Listen to Gertrude read her favorite VOF assignment.


CristinaQuisbert

Bolivia CristinaQuisbert

Bolivia

Mentor: Marcie Lesnick
Editorial Midwives: Gemma Dreher, Leslie Parrilla

An Aymara indigenous blogger and photographer from the highlands of South America, Cristina did not want to wait for someone else to hand her a microphone. Instead, she seized the Internet to broadcast the wisdom of her people. A long bus ride or a steep mountain climb does not deter her from capturing the stories of young and old Aymara across her country. She is determined to follow in the steps of her ancestors and contribute to the revitalization of her culture.

“I want to speak and write about my culture and the situation for rural and urban indigenous women. I want to be part of a huge network of active women sharing our stories.”


Dando

Zambia Dando

Zambia

Mentor: Vera Salter
Editorial Midwives: Theresa Braine, Francie Wenner

A social worker, Dando works with HIV+ people in her community who face stigma and discrimination. Using journalism to free and strengthen her own voice, she fights to help other Zambian women know their rights and how to defend themselves. She hopes to become a member of parliament, where women are still under-represented.

“I believe when women’s voices arise they can reach policy makers who can change the unnecessary traditions which restrict women from expressing themselves.”


dr edonna

Uganda dr edonna

Uganda

Mentor: Dorothy Orszulack
Editorial Midwives: Emily Miller, Karthika Mohan

Since she was 9-years-old, defying her father’s fists, Edonna felt her voice stirring and had a vision of speaking to large crowds of people. Although in her 43 years she has faced devastating life events of poverty, abandonment, homelessness, false incarceration, and the loss of two daughters, her motivational nature has propelled her to overcome and receive a PhD. Today, she devotes herself to establishing African women’s place in the history of Africa. Deeply spiritual, she envisions a world where nurturing instead of destruction will be our number one priority.

"My personal vision for my life is to develop a community where my truth inspires people to come out of their hiding places and show their real face."


giftypearl.abenaab

Ghana giftypearl.abenaab

Ghana

Mentor: Kathy Castro
Editorial Midwives: Gretchen Lee, Sally Hedman

Children, Youth and Women’s rights advocate Gifty releases messages of strength, independence, and development through all forms of media. She loves to paint with words and capture the sounds of society around her. When she provides media trainings to youth her heart bulges with pride as she hears future life-givers, ministers, presidents, and change agents speaking their deepest thoughts, or “adwen,” aloud.

“Being a correspondent is a sacred opportunity to increase the volume of the silent yet loud voices of my sisters in every corner of Ghana.”

Listen to Gifty read her favorite VOF assignment.


Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman

Sudan Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman

Sudan

Mentor: Helen Hamada
Editorial Midwives: Carly Diaz, Molly Rudberg-Leshnock

Born to an illiterate farming family in Central Sudan, Halima screamed in the house until she was allowed to go to school like her brothers. She made the seven kilometer trek on the back of a donkey, an animal that she realized, ironically, was valued more than girls. Now, she is victorious, wearing the toga of a respected journalist and academic living in Saudia Arabia, writing in French, English, and her mother tongue of Arabic. She sheds light on her beloved war torn country of Sudan, especially the lives of the economically and socially displaced.

“It is the gift of the century for women to deliver their messages freely and be heard.”


Ivaldete

Brazil Ivaldete

Brazil

Mentor: Susan Geear
Editorial Midwives: Gemma Dreher, Molli Vandehey-Patterson

Living in the midst of the drug warfare and gun battles in the favelas (slums) of Rio de Janeiro means that it is not uncommon for Ivaldete to encounter the aftermath of violence when she steps out of her door. Yet this self-proclaimed “woman warrior” and 41-year old grandmother finds joy through her art and craftwork, selling purses for extra income. She loves her seven grandchildren fiercely, and calls them her lion cubs. She dreams one day of having a home in a secure area to keep them safe.

“It is a tremendous honor to speak on behalf of all the women who don’t have the chance to scream to the world that “Yes, we exist!”


jap21

Bolivia jap21

Bolivia

Mentor: Yvonne Bryant
Editorial Midwives: Carly Diaz, Sally Hedman

Jacqueline has worked hard to achieve her dreams and effect change in Bolivia, a country renowned for its natural beauty and indigenous government. Raising two children by herself after divorce, she decided that life would not defeat her. College student by night, she paid for school by working as a translator and secretary, while well as building up her first economic initiative to provide pastry to restaurants, and employing three other women in her same situation. A talented entrepreneur, she has since launched three small businesses and worked with social organizations and indigenous groups across her country for over a decade.

"My motivation in life is to help women realize their dreams. The hardest work, though, is to have them realize they actually do have dreams."


Joannes

Kenya Joannes

Kenya

Mentor: Linda Lubin
Editorial Midwives: Theresa Braine, Molly Rudberg-Leshnock

Rejecting the belief that her worth is measured in the number of cows her dowry could bring, Joanne believes firmly in the power of Kenya’s women. As a community information volunteer, she inspires women who have been intimidated into silence to speak against the injustices they endure. For Joanne, being a bold citizen journalist and a poet is an antidote to life in a country where “media only serves those with money.”

“I believe that through my voice, I will be able to empower and influence women all over the world to think outside the box and walk above the veil of suppression and silent submission created by our society.”


Khushbu

Nepal Khushbu

Nepal

Mentor: Virginia Lee
Editorial Midwives: Theresa Braine, Emily Miller

Nepal’s increasing unrest hit close to home for Khushbu in 2007 when her father was kidnapped and tortured. Despite media repression and growing insecurity in Kathmandu, this 24-year-old dynamo only pushes harder to speak out and develop her nation by obtaining her degree in economics. Fired up to leave her “stamp emblazoned on humanity,” she visualizes a country where mothers and wives can send their husbands and sons outside without fear of never seeing them again.

“Being a correspondent will help me to show the gruesome realities of Nepal and bring a revolution of change in my country and the world.”


lanjana

Nepal lanjana

Nepal

Mentor: Grace A. Dunbar
Editorial Midwives: Erin Fanshier, Molli Vandehey-Patterson

24-year-old Anjana is the main brain behind many youth-led initiatives across Nepal, a nation teetering on the verge of social and political upheaval. From eradicating sex slavery to conserving wetlands and upholding women’s land rights, you will find Anjana at the forefront, inciting and organizing others to claim justice. Despite spotty electricity and internet access, this poet, writer, and activist is making waves, enabling the cries of the unheard to transform this beautiful nation.

“I can put the plights of women in Nepal in front of the world.”


Leah Auma Okeyo

Kenya Leah Auma Okeyo

Kenya

Mentor: Debbie Daniels
Editorial Midwives: Gretchen Lee, Molly Rudberg-Leshnock

Two years ago Leah was dying from AIDS. Then, she made the long-trek to an Internet café and started connecting with AIDS leaders around the world. With their help, she planned income-generating activities that expanded her AIDS work, that allowed her to train 16 other HIV+ women and nurses in her community. With a newly-gifted computer, she became the first-ever local correspondent for World Pulse and used PulseWire to report on the voices and needs of her community.

“Two years ago I was dying from AIDS. Today, I am alive and thriving. PulseWire has created hope that I cannot describe. I have so many dreams, and now, I’m going to do them all!”


LIBA

Botswana LIBA

Botswana

Mentor: Cathy Goerz
Editorial Midwives: Gemma Dreher, Francie Wenner

As a single mother raising a 7-year-old child with multiple disabilities in Africa, Liba has her share of challenges. As a survivor of abuse herself, somehow she is finding a way to simultaneously care for her son, while living her dream to provide free legal services to women and children survivors of domestic violence.

“A door has been opened in my heart that I never thought would be opened. Now I can heal the wounds of my own history and tell the stories of all the abused women and girls that I have listened to since I started pursing my dream at 6-years-old.”


LUZ MARINA JARAMILLO

Colombia LUZ MARINA JARAMILLO

Colombia

Mentor: Marla Teyolia
Editorial Midwives: Theresa Braine, Molli Vandehey-Patterson

A self-described “rebel with a cause,” Luz Marina is a strong-willed ambassador for women and children in Bogota, the cultural and political hub of Colombia. As a lawyer, businesswoman, mother, and lover of literature, she seeks to showcase both the intrepid role professional Colombian woman play on the national stage but also the struggles they face to balance their family lives and partnerships.

“The voice of a woman full of love toward others can really change the world."


ma.chona lasaca

Thailand ma.chona lasaca

Thailand/Philippines

Mentor: LeTonia Jones
Editorial Midwives: Francie Wenner, Molly Rudberg-Leshnock

Surviving in Mindinao, the volatile southern island of the Philippines is a daily concern for Ma Chona. Plunging deeply into remote areas as a development worker, she supports indigenous peoples, farmers and fisher folk, to build microfinance programs and protect their environment. Mining on ancestral lands, extra-judicial killings, and interferences from the Catholic Church with family planning programs may daunt her, but she will not be deterred. Her calling is to be a light for others.

“I can be a pair of eyes that sees the world beyond what is visible. By writing and reporting I can be a heart that echoes the despairs and the aspirations of the communities I know well.”


malayapinas

Philippines malayapinas

Philippines

Mentor: Jeanne Nametz
Editorial Midwives: Karthika Mohan, Erin Fanshier

Since childhood Malaypinas has seen the dark side of globalization in the Philippines. She walked to school barefoot after early morning hours selling eggs and cigarettes to ship passengers in her nation’s ports. She toiled in the banana plantations to earn her way to college and became a young mother. Since secret military forces abducted her trade-union husband, she has raised her fist as a fierce organizer for local health, fair trade, and food security. Her dream is to see the Filipino people live to the fullness of their potential and women free to chart their own destiny.

“I want to show the world that Filipina women are not servants of the world but are servants of peace and freedom.”

Listen to Malayapinas read her favorite VOF assignment.


mamaAfrica

Kenya mamaAfrica

Kenya

Mentor: Virginia Herndon
Editorial Midwives: Carly Diaz, Erin Fanshier

Lindy Wafula’s life has been shaped by the harsh reality of the AIDS epidemic, which, when she was fourteen, cost her her parents and her home. Struggling to provide for her younger brothers taught her about the crying needs of motherhood, inspiring her to develop Project Africa, a program to empower rural women and girls through resources, education, and support.

“I don’t tell my story to gain pity but to show that each of us can turn our painful pasts into powerful engines to start the wheel of change in our society.”


Manori

Sri Lanka Manori

Sri Lanka

Mentor: Taur D. Orange
Editorial Midwives: Leslie Parrilla, Sally Hedman

Growing up in Sri Lanka, Manori's childhood memories are clouded with images of military conflict, injustice, and violence. From these harrowing experiences emerged a determined woman with a strong sense of self and a desire to improve conditions for those around her. Manori is a great believer in the power of words to create social justice.

“I find the power of words as strong as ever to lift up a broken spirit, to give hope, to make people take action.”

Listen to Manori read her favorite VOF assignment.


Maria de Chirikof

United States Maria de Chirikof

United States

Mentor: Meena Sharma
Editorial Midwives: Gemma Dreher, Carly Diaz

An Aleut woman in Anchorage, Alaska and mother of four daughters, Maria de Chirikof understands first hand the ravages of emotional violence, having recently ended her abusive marriage. Through the power of web 2.0 she seeks to break the isolation other women feel around the world by showing them that they are not alone. She home schools her daughters in Aleut tradition and women’s history, infusing them with confidence to step out and shape a new world.

“The way to make the world a better place is by letting each woman discover that she is worthwhile and create a positive image for herself that will spread throughout her community and the world.”


Martha

Zimbabwe Martha

Zimbabwe

Mentor: Martina Barth
Editorial Midwives: Karthika Mohan, Carly Diaz

Martha is a grandmother and activist living under authoritarian rule in Zimbabwe. As an HIV+ woman in a land where most social services have been wiped out, she inspires others daily to develop positive attitudes toward their own fights against AIDS. As she speaks out through PulseWire, Martha challenges her country’s efforts to silence its people.

“The authorities are so scared of people’s ability to access information on the Internet that they stifle us.”


Nusrat Ara

India Nusrat Ara

Kashmir

Mentor: Debra Lach
Editorial Midwives: Emily Miller, Erin Fanshier

Nusrat is a young voice from Kashmir, one of the most militarized zones in the world. Even in the midst of violent protests and frequent searches by guards, Nusrat draws courage and strength from the women who face hardships, yet continue to fight for their communities. Writing helps her to stay alive and to detoxify the negative emotions and images she experiences on a daily basis.

"I will bring forth the stories of my people, my region, especially women who have suffered so much, because mere survival tops the priority list in a conflict region. The best part about being a World Pulse correspondent is finding solutions and fulfilling my dreams."


Ayobami Olusola

Nigeria Ayobami Olusola

Nigeria

Mentor: Patty Goodwin
Editorial Midwives: Gemma Dreher, Molli Vandehey-Patterson

Despite conflict, corruption, and strife in her country, Ayobami believes Nigeria “can be great," but not without women’s contributions. She uses her journalistic voice to bring freeing truths to her community.

"Now I am all set to explode like a bomb, a good bomb. Instead of leaving devastation and destruction behind me, I will leave beauty and much more."


olutosin

Nigeria olutosin

Nigeria

Mentor: Natalie Safir
Editorial Midwives: Theresa Braine, Leslie Parrilla

Raised by an uneducated widow in a society that disdains widows, Olutosin emerged from the shadow of discrimination and abuse to become a warrior for the sexually-violated masses in Nigeria. A witness to the mean streets of the capital city of Lagos, she condemns rampant government corruption as well as penal codes that force girls who have been raped to present three witnesses in court. A glittering example of dignity and healing, Olutosin aspires to become a renowned speaker on sexual assault.

“I will unveil the mind of raped women, repair lives through words of encouragement, and heal the wounded in Nigeria through articles written from new angles that will be read across the globe.”


stella Ndugire-Mbugua

Kenya stella Ndugire-Mbugua

Kenya

Mentor: JLove Calderon
Editorial Midwives: Gretchen Lee, Francie Wenner

As the first child of five siblings Stella sang praises in her Kenyan church. Today, she is just as passionate about lifting women out of destitute situations as she is about music, hoping one day to record an album about the women of Africa. Since media brought rape and sexual violence to the forefront of public awareness in Kenya seven years ago, Stella has devoted her life to encouraging women who have suffered abuse to speak out and reclaim their lives.

“I want to see more women empowered through web 2.0. I want to see lives changed so that more women can learn to fight for their place in their homes, relationships, and their workplaces.”


sunita.basnet

Nepal sunita.basnet

Nepal

Mentor: Carol Anderson
Editorial Midwives: Gretchen Lee, Erin Fanshier

Sunita blazed a path by becoming the first girl to complete high school in her impoverished town in Nepal. Since then, her thirst for justice led her at age 16 to start a successful local savings club for women in her village of 500. She has traveled across her country recording the stories of rural villagers, even while witnessing bloody attacks by the Maoist insurgency. Now, at Bangladesh’s Asian University for Women on a full scholarship, Sunita vows to continue educating women to eradicate poverty.

"I want to make a network in every country and bring changes in people's lives. The power of words is the key to shake the world."

Listen to Sunita read her favorite VOF assignment.


Tanya

Pakistan Tanya

Pakistan

Mentor: Caroline Thorne-Lyman
Editorial Midwives: Leslie Parrilla, Molli Vandehey-Patterson

As a Muslim woman of Indo-Pak origin, Tanya is not content to allow the propaganda surrounding Pakistan – which she calls home – and her religion to remain unchallenged. She hopes to blend her passions - performing arts, filmmaking, and journalism with human right activism to portray the many facets of life surrounding South Asia and the Muslim world. She is determined to build bridges between the people of this region and elevate it’s many voices.

“If I can create awareness and positively impact one woman, my message can make it to a generation beyond.”


Tina

United States Tina

United States

Mentor: Lynn Margileth
Editorial Midwives: Karthika Mohan, Leslie Parrilla

Living in New York’s rough and tumble Bronx, this mother of two small sons hails from Britain. Inspired by the spirit of Camelot, she engages her fellow immigrant neighbors in quests for urban reconciliation. Her voice spreads even further, however, as an artist, a writer, and an advocate for an international network of thousands of mothers who are galvanizing to build a safer, saner world on behalf of all our children.

“This land of immigrants, of its cultural diversity, tension, violence and indomitable grace, has profoundly impacted me. My writing seeks to break through cultural barriers of misunderstanding and foster peace.”

Listen to Tina read her favorite VOF assignment.


Victoria Vorosciuc

Moldova, Republic of Victoria Vorosciuc

Republic of Moldova

Mentor: Pat O'Connor
Editorial Midwives: Emily Miller, Molly Rudberg-Leshnock

Victoria was ecstatically blogging the scene when tens of thousands of youth protested recent elections in front of parliament in Chisinau, the capital of communist Moldova. A young journalist, truth-seeker, and documentarian, she thrives on every day coincidences, deja-vus and omens that fill her world with color and joy. She works to show the world the budding hope in her little-known country, and explores its pressing issues of emigration, corruption, and the tensions that exist between ethnic Romanians and Russians.

“Bring the chance we need, people of Moldova! The bloggers create the change! Time to wake up!”

Listen to Victoria read her favorite VOF assignment.


Xthina-Avila

Mexico Xthina-Avila

Mexico

Mentor: Mary Bennett
Editorial Midwives: Carly Diaz, Sally Hedman

Growing up in a conservative Mexican town with six siblings and parents who were the town’s first mixed religious couple, taught Cristina a lot about resolving conflict. After several draining years working in mainstream media and watching her country spiral into worsening gang violence, she has become passionate about “peace journalism”—providing stories of solutions and people working for a better society. She is a true believer that journalism can change the world.

"To be a woman today is a long road to walk. It’s a road to recover the power that culture has taken from us."

Related links:

Voices of Our Future 2009 Vision Mentors

World Pulse is honored to partner with the Empowerment Institute for the mentoring portion of the program. The 31 mentors are generously donating their time and talent to support, guide, and empower their correspondent to address her challenges and reach her goals.


Gail Straub

United States Gail Straub

Gail Straub co-founded Empowerment Training Programs in 1981. Since then she has offered training to thousands of people throughout America, Europe, Russia, China, and East Asia. She co-directs the Empowerment Institute Certification Program, a school for transformative leadership. Gail's tireless commitment to global women's empowerment and her natural ability to think big brought the mentoring portion of Voices of Our Future to life.

2009 Mentors


Caroline Thorne-Lyman

United States Caroline Thorne-Lyman

Correspondent: Tanya


Vera Salter

United States Vera Salter

Correspondent: Dando


Taur D. Orange

United States Taur D. Orange

Correspondent: Manori


Pat O'Connor

United States Pat O'Connor

Visit website »
Correspondents: Arda and Victoria Vorosciuc


Lynn Margileth

United States Lynn Margileth

Visit website »
Correspondent: Tina


Linda Lubin

United States Linda Lubin

Visit website »
Correspondent: Joannes


Amy Lombardo

United States Amy Lombardo

Visit website »
Correspondent: busayo


Virginia Herndon

United States Virginia Herndon

Visit website »
Correspondent: mamaAfrica


Yvonne Bryant

United States Yvonne Bryant

Correspondent: jap21


Patty Goodwin

United States Patty Goodwin

Correspondent: Ayobami Olusola


JLove Claderon

United States JLove Calderon

Visit website »
Correspondent: stella Ndugire- Mbugua


Marcie Lesnick

United States Marcie Lesnick

Visit website »
Correspondent: CristinaQuisbert


LeTonia Jones

United States LeTonia Jones

Visit website »
Correspondent: ma.chona lasaca


Cathy Goerz

United States Cathy Goerz

Visit website »
Correspondent: LIBA


Carol Adams

United States Carol Adams

Correspondent: cad_communication


Natalie Safir

United States Natalie Safir

Visit website »
Correspondent: olutosin


Carol Anderson

United States Carol Anderson

Visit website »
Correspondent: sunita.basnet


Virginia Lee

United States Virginia Lee

Visit website »
Correspondent: Khushbu


Mary Bennett

United States Mary Bennett

Visit website »
Correspondent: Xthina-Avila


Martina Barth

United States Martina Barth

Correspondent: Martha


Kathy Castro

United States Kathy Castro

Visit website »
Correspondent: giftypearl.abenaab


image

United States Grace A. Dunbar

Correspondent: lanjana


Helen Hamada

United States Helen Hamada

Correspondent: Halima Mohamed Abdel rahman


image

United States Debra Lach

Visit website »
Correspondent: Nusrat Ara


Jeanne Nametz

United States Jeanne Nametz

Correspondent: malayapinas


image

United States Meena Sharma

Visit website »
Correspondent: Maria de Chirikof


Marla Teyolia

United States Marla Teyolia

Correspondent: Luz Maria Jaramillo


Dorothy Orszulak

United States Dorothy Orszulak

Visit website »
Correspondent: dr edonna


Susan Geear

United States Susan Geear

Visit website »
Correspondent: Ivaldete


Debbie Daniels

United States Debbie Daniels

Visit website »
Correspondent: Auma

Hear the Voices of Our Future

Voices of Our Future

A Speaking and Media Tour with a New Generation of Women
Web 2.0 Citizen Journalists

November 2010

A new network of trained women citizen journalists and leaders are speaking out from some of the most forgotten regions of the world. This November, meet three award-winning correspondents for yourself as they travel across the US sharing how the power of web 2.0 has changed their lives and advising us on how we can harness technology to empower women worldwide.

Meet the Voices of Our Future Awardees

malayapinas

Malayapinas
Philippines Philippines

"I want to show the world that Filipina women are not servants of the world but are servants of peace and freedom."
Malayapinas

"I want to make a network in every country and bring changes in people's lives. The power of words is the key to shake the world."
Sunita Basnet

"Everywhere in Bolivia and Latin America women are used to suffering, but my motivation in life is to help them realize their dreams."
Jacqueline Patiño

Follow the Tour!

Follow and engage with Sunita, Jacqueline, and Malayapinas as they document their experience speaking to U.S. Audiences for the first time.

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About World Pulse

World Pulse is a global media enterprise devoted to bringing women a global voice. Through World Pulse’s interactive media channels over 40,000 women from over 175 countries are speaking out, connecting, and changing each other’s lives — including those using internet cafes and cell phones from rural villages.

About the Voices of Our Future Training Program

Voices of Our Future is World Pulse’s online training program in web 2.0, citizen journalism, and empowerment for emerging grassroots women leaders, primarily from conflict zones and other unheard regions of the world. During a rigorous five month program, correspondents gain the technical and professional skills to use new media to speak to the world; overcome barriers to achieving their visions; and raise awareness about the issues in their regions through publication in World Pulse and other international media channels.

About the Voices of Our Future Awardees

Malayapinas (Her real name has been withheld to protect her security.)
Since childhood Malayapinas has seen the dark side of globalization and violence in the Philippines. She walked to school barefoot after selling eggs and cigarettes in her nation's ports, and toiled in banana plantations to earn her way through college. Her dream is to see her people free to chart their own destiny. Sadly, two of her women colleagues were recently killed in the largest massacre of journalists in recorded history. For her, the risks she faces by speaking out are outweighed by the risks of continued silence.

Sunita Basnet
Sunita blazed a path by becoming the first girl to complete high school in her impoverished village in Nepal. Since then, her thirst for justice led her at age 16 to start a successful local savings club for women in her village of 500. She has traveled across her country recording the stories of rural villagers, even while witnessing bloody attacks by the Maoist insurgency. Now, Sunita vows to continue educating and networking women in her country and beyond to eradicate poverty.

Jacqueline Patiño
Jacqueline has worked hard to achieve her dreams and ignite change in Bolivia. At 18 she found herself on the streets with two children, fleeing severe violence at home. Yet, she decided that life would not defeat her. College student by night, she took on odd jobs, eventually launching her own small businesses. Today she is a fierce advocate for girl mothers and has worked with social organizations and indigenous groups across Bolivia spreading her message of non-violence and possibility.

Each correspondent will be supplied with a laptop thanks to the generosity of Grouse Mountain Spa and Resort, Vancouver B.C.

The Voices of Our Future tour is made possible by the generous support of:
EILEEN FISHER, Nan Crawford, Adam Bacher Photography, Mercy Corps Action Center, The Paley Center for Media, The Link For Women, our generous hosts, and the intrepid World Pulse team.

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Special Thanks to Our Sponsor:

Eileen Fisher

HEAR THE VOICES OF OUR FUTURE at the following events

New York, NY
November 8
EILEEN FISHER
Public Event
RSVP

November 10
Press & Media Forum: Paley Center for Media

Washington, DC
November 11
EILEEN FISHER
Public Event
RSVP

Denver, CO
November 13
Private Salon

November 14
Denver Woman's Press Club
RSVP

San Francisco, CA
November 15
Private Salon

November 15
Training Forum at Global Fund for Women

Portland, OR
November 17
Mercy Corps
Public Event
RSVP

November 18
The Link For Women’s Leadership Event
Register

Press and Media

For media inquiries, contact info@worldpulse.com.