2013 Voices of Our Future Application Classroom

Welcome to the Voices of Our Future Application Classroom

Training the Next Generation of Women Citizen Journalists and Grassroots Leaders Shaping Our World

You will find all of your learning materials and assignments for the month-long application process in this classroom. Each week for the next four weeks, we will make a link to the learning materials and assignments live. There are four assignments in total.You must post these assignments in your journal with the correct tag and by the due date, to be considered. A panel of staff and volunteer Listeners will be evaluating and posting comments on your assignments each week. Listeners will be leaving comments on your assignments as well.

We encourage all applicants to be supportive of one another during this process. You can support your fellow applicants by posting and answering questions, asking for feedback on drafts, interacting with each other on the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group page, and inviting other applicants to become part of your community.

Although there are only 30 spaces available in the program, we value each and every one of your voices. We hope that you will continue to build your networks on World Pulse and reach out to women around the globe during and after this application process!

How to Get Started:

Step 1: Click on the links at the bottom of the page for the learning materials and your assignment. We publish (make live) each week's materials separately. You will be able to access each week's materials on the following dates:

Step 2: Read through the materials carefully. You will have approximately one week to complete the reading and writing assignment.

Step 3: Post your final assignment in your Journal on World Pulse, carefully following the directions for tagging. We are able to identify and evaluate your assignment only if you tag it correctly! To do this, go to your Journal (if you are not already logged in, you will be directed to do so). On the right hand side of the page, there will be an orange button that says "Post to Your Journal". Once you click on this button, you will be able to post your assignment. Give your journal entry an interesting title, then follow the instructions given for tagging.

For a description and instructions about tagging, read this helpful journal post by World Pulse Online Community Manager, Scott: http://worldpulse.com/pulsewire/solutions/64089

We encourage you to solicit feedback from other applicants on your assignment drafts. Try asking another applicant to read your assignment (you can send them a personal email, or post your draft to your journal). Please do not post your drafts in the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group. This group is primarily meant to serve as a space to ask questions about the application process.

Your assignments will be reviewed based on the criteria we have listed in the Voices of Our Future Applicants group*. May 20, we will announce the 30 applicants chosen to participate in the full program and become 2013 Voices of Our Future Correspondents.

If you have any questions, go to our Frequently Asked Questions section to the left in the sidebar, or post your question to the Voices of Our Future Applicant Group. If you still aren’t able to find an answer, please contact our team by sending an email to vof@worldpulse.com.

*For selection criteria visit the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group or click here for complete rules

Good luck!

LINKS
Week 1: Introduction to Citizen Journalism and Digital Empowerment
Week 2: Personal Stories
Week 3: Online Activity
Week 4: Vision Mentor Methodology and The Divine Feminine

Sidebar
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Helpful links:
VOF Program Page
2013 VOF Applicants Group
2013 VOF Listeners Group
Word Count Tool

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Where should I post my article?
In your personal journal on World Pulse. Do not post your final assignment in the Voices of Our Future Group journal. This Group is reserved for updates, discussions and questions.

2. When is the assignment due?
The assignments are due on: April 8, April 15, April 22 and April 29 by 11:55pm PDT (Pacific Daylight Time), or GMT-7.
You can check what time this is in your local timezone at this link: Time Zone Converter

3. What should I title my assignment?
You can title your assignment anything you want, however you must tag your assignment correctly. Each weekly assignment has specific instruction on how to tag.

4. Can I write my story in my native language?
At this time we ask that you submit your assignment in English. However, you can use the Google Translation tool, which is at the very top of this page, to help. Click on the "Translate page" tab to find your language. But remember, this is not a perfect tool and there may be mistakes.

5. How will I know if my assignment is 500 words or less?
Word Count Tool is a simple and quick online tool to find your word count. Simply copy and paste your article in the form and click on the Submit button. Your word count will appear under the form.

If you are using Microsoft Word, select the text of your article. Click on Tools in the top menu. Select Word Count from the drop down menu.

6. Who will be reading my assignment?
World Pulse has gathered together an international panel of Listeners, composed of World Pulse staff, community members and volunteers. This panel will be reviewing your assignments based on the criteria listed on the Applicants Group page.

You are encouraged to meet the Listeners by visiting their group here. Although this group is closed to non-Listeners, you will be able to friend Listeners and stay informed of what is happening "behind the scenes."

7. I still have a question. What do I do?
We encourage you to post your question to the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group, so that all applicants may benefit from your inquiry. We will answer it as fast as we can.

Voices of Our Future Application: Week One

Introduction to Citizen Journalism and Digital Empowerment

Week One of the application process has been designed to provide you with an introduction to women’s empowerment through digital media, and citizen journalism. These are rich and complex topics and we are only scratching the surface.

Whether you are an active blogger or just recently started to use the Internet, we hope you will learn something new and valuable this week that supports your personal goals and vision in a digital media world. We also hope to ignite a passion to seek out ways to bring your voice to a global audience.

Before you get started, please take a moment to read through our Safety and Security Guidelines.

Week 1 Learning Outcomes and Reading Material

During this week, you will be introduced to:

Digital Media and Women's Empowerment (1/3)
An Introduction to Digital Media Concepts (2/3)
Opportunities Provided by Digital Media (3/3)

Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week One Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Questions? Please check the Frequently Asked Questions to the left.

Sidebar Body: 

Classroom Navigation

Week One Learning Materials
Digital Media and Women's Empowerment (1/3)
An Introduction to Digital Media Concepts (2/3)
Opportunities Provided by Digital Media (3/3)

Week One Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Where should I post my article?
In your personal journal on World Pulse. Do not post your final assignment in the Voices of Our Future Group journal. This Group is reserved for updates, discussions and questions.

2. When is the assignment due?
The assignments are due on: April 8, April 15, April 22 and April 29 by 11:55pm PDT (Pacific Daylight Time), or GMT-7.
You can check what time this is in your local timezone at this link: Time Zone Converter

3. What should I title my assignment?
You can title your assignment anything you want, however you must tag your assignment correctly. Each weekly assignment has specific instruction on how to tag.

4. Can I write my story in my native language?
At this time we ask that you submit your assignment in English. However, you can use the Google Translation tool, which is at the very top of this page, to help. Click on the "Translate page" tab to find your language. But remember, this is not a perfect tool and there may be mistakes.

5. How will I know if my assignment is 500 words or less?
Word Count Tool is a simple and quick online tool to find your word count. Simply copy and paste your article in the form and click on the Submit button. Your word count will appear under the form.

If you are using Microsoft Word, select the text of your article. Click on Tools in the top menu. Select Word Count from the drop down menu.

6. Who will be reading my assignment?
World Pulse has gathered together an international panel of Listeners, composed of World Pulse staff, community and volunteers. This panel will be reviewing your assignments based on the criteria listed on the Applicants Group page.

You are encouraged to meet the Listeners by visiting their group here. Although this group is closed to non-Listeners, you will be able to friend Listeners and stay informed of what is happening "behind the scenes."

7. I still have a question. What do I do?
We encourage you to post your question to the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group, so that all applicants may benefit from your inquiry. We will answer it as fast as we can.

Digital Media and Women's Empowerment (1/3)

Grassroots women leaders, like you, are an untapped source of innovation and solutions that will provide the key to solving global problems. Yet far too often global decision-makers working to advance social change (i.e., donors, non-governmental organizations, businesses, traditional media, and policy makers) overlook your voice—and sometimes actually speak for you!

Did you know, that:

  • Today women constitute 20.4% of the members of parliaments around the world - 1
  • Only 24% of the people talked about in the news are women - 2
  • Only 6% of stories highlight issues of gender equality or inequality - 3
  • Almost half (46%) of all news stories reinforce gender stereotypes - 4
  • On average female journalists earn 16% less than their male counterparts - 5

However, increasing access to communications technology, citizen journalism, and digital empowerment provides us with a historical opportunity to promote our voices, strengthen collaboration, and accelerate the exchange of working models for women’s empowerment and solutions to global challenges. A new generation of grassroots women leaders is emerging online. We want to connect with each other and our allies to share our experiences and bring our stories, needs and solutions to the forefront of global awareness.

Speaking our minds and sharing our visions does make a difference. Last year, Neema Namadamu from the Democratic Republic of Congo, started an initiative through World Pulse to "educated women to come together at a cyber café." The women who benefited from Neema's initiative named themselves The Maman Shujaa, which means Hero Women in Swahili. Together they started a petition for Peace in Congo through Change.org which has been signed by over 100 000 people. On January 29th 2013, the petition was hand delivered to the White House National Security Council leaders.

Nilima Raut, a 2010 Correspondent from Nepal, had her story of Chhaupadi, the ritual banishment of women during menstruation and after child birth, published by Women's News Network, which has a readership of over 320,000- including 480 UN agencies and affiliates, and non-governmental organizations.

2009 Voices of Our Future Correspondent Halima Rahman, from Sudan, wrote about her personal experience with female genital mutilation. Her story has been read by over 30,000 people on World Pulse, and was also published by the Women’s United Nations Report Network.

According to the Global Media Monitoring Project, when we (women) report and write the news, we are more likely to talk about women’s political participation and gender-based violence. We also feature women as news subjects and challenge gender stereotypes far more often than men. In other words, your stories do make a difference!

It is not just our written voices that make a difference. When you connect with other women and share your vision for social change and for the future, it is powerful. Last January, Tessie from Nigeria found a training opportunity in India, posted on World Pulse Resource Exchange by Nilima. The two women connected and Tessie traveled to India for the training.

In 2009, Voices of Our Future Correspondent Lindy Wafula connected with Araceli, another member on our online community. Lindy identified a need in her community for improved health care for women and girls. In 2010, Araceli, who is also a nurse, traveled to Kenya to help Lindy set up a mobile health education program, using mopeds to transport health workers to rural villages and reach out to women and girls.

Each of our voices is powerful. New media and Web 2.0 provide us with the tools that can help grow and support our visions and connect us with allies to bring about social change.

Use the navigation bar below to move to the next section or return to the previous.

References

1-Quota Project
2, 3, 4-Global Media Monitoring Report
5-International Federation of Journalists

Week 1 Classroom Navigation

Week One Learning Materials
Digital Media and Women's Empowerment (1/3)
An Introduction to Digital Media Concepts (2/3)
Opportunities Provided by Digital Media (3/3)

Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week One Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

An Introduction to Digital Media and Web 2.0 Concepts (2/3)

As visionaries who care deeply about issues locally and globally, you have dared to take on the tools of digital media to amplify your voices, develop networks, and collaborate with other change-makers around the world. We know that getting started can sometimes be overwhelming. Don't worry, just take it one step at a time and remember that this is new for many people.

Let’s get started. The first question we want to tackle is, what do the terms digital media, Web 2.0, social media and social networking actually mean?

Web 2.0 is the platform on which digital media, social media, and social networking all happen. Web 2.0 is a set of applications (tools) and technologies which allow for participatory information sharing, user-generated content and design, and collaboration. Basically Web 2.0 allows you to participate in the creation and consumption of content and interact with people online. Examples of Web 2.0 applications include Blogs, search engines, Facebook, Twitter, Wikis, video sharing sites like YouTube, interactive news sites, Google maps, etc.

So, what is Digital Media? First, think of traditional media products like magazines, newspapers, radio shows and television programs. Most of these products are created by professionals and distributed to every day citizens who rarely participate in the creation of the actual content. Digital media is the use of the Web 2.0 platform to create a new set of tools which allows media content (articles, radio shows, videos) to be created, edited, published, and distributed by you. Digital media is interactive, user-driven, and gives on-demand access to real time information.

Digital media is made up of many different tools. Twitter and Facebook can be used to announce news; Blogs like your World Pulse online journal or Blogher can be used to start global conversations; and free online software like YouTube can be used to edit and distribute videos on the events happening in your community. For example, how many of you have heard about the issue of breast ironing in Cameroon from traditional media sources? Probably not many. 2010 Voices of Our Future Correspondent Leina used digital video tools to create a short film on this debilitating practice affecting millions of girls in her region. Then, she posted it in her World Pulse journal. Over 14,000 people have read and commented on her story on World Pulse. And because of her blog, CNN decided to break a news story on the subject! She is using new media tools to get her voice heard and drive global conversations.

What is Social Media? Social media is media used specifically for social interaction online. Social media allows you to meet new people and connect with your friends and family. Some examples include Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, Google+, etc.

Social networking is the building of community and connecting to people online based on profession, geography, similar interests, age, race, and gender to name a few. You often use social media tools such as Facebook to create a network online. The benefit of social networking is that you can quickly get feedback, share ideas, keep people up-to-date on your projects, and organize a gathering or action in your community. World Pulse's online community is a great example of social networking. In the World Pulse Online Community you can write about your own life, make friends you have never met, upload photos, and engage in dialogue about things that are important to you.

The term citizen journalist often refers to people without professional journalism training who use digital media to publish, fact-check, and distribute their stories globally. Unlike traditional print media where one must submit an article to an editorial team to have it published, a citizen journalist who is empowered with digital media tools can become the writer, editor, publisher, and distributor. Citizen journalists can create a global network of supporters by using online social networking communities such as World Pulse, Facebook, or Twitter. The more you comment on blogs and interact with other citizen journalists and community organizers online, the more you expand your readership, and get feedback on your ideas and projects, or collaborate with others from around the world.

Other useful terms:

  • Online: Refers to being connected on the Internet. For example, online community organizing means you are using the Internet to organize a group of people around shared interests, actions or events.
  • Offline: Refers to something that does not happen on the Internet. For example, an "offline training program" means a training program that happens in real time, with face to face interaction.
  • Post: To submit content (writing, videos, photos) online is called "posting" or "making a post." The content itself is also called a post.
  • Scroll: To move up and down, or left to right, on a webpage.
  • Tag/Tagging: To label a post or web page with key words. Tagging allows posts to be more easily found by others on World Pulse, web searches or by browsing the Internet. For instance, if you write about a local leader who is carrying out a community development project in your area, you may want to tag your post with the local leader's name and what kind of project it is (water, sanitation, health), and your country.
  • Blog: A term combining the words "web log," referring to a website or part of a website that functions like a journal. Blogs are usually maintained by a single individual, providing commentary, news and events, and may include videos or images. Your World Pulse journal is a blog!
  • Online forums/Message boards: Online discussion sites or virtual bulletin boards, where many users can submit content to a larger group. On our online community, Groups, Resource Exchange, and Sharing Solutions function as online forums and message boards.
  • Network: A group of people with common interests who come together to provide support, create dialogue and share information.
  • Email lists: A group of email addresses that receive the same messages. Individuals can subscribe to email lists in order to receive regular updates from organizations or groups.
  • Bookmarks: Shortcuts to URLs (web site addresses such as www.worldpulse.com) stored in a web browser (Firefox, Chrome, Netscape, Safari or Internet Explorer). If you find a web page that you would like to return to, click on the bookmark tab (sometimes called Favorites or Shortcuts) of your web browser and then click on "Bookmark This Page" or "Add a Bookmark." The site is now stored in your list of bookmarks so you can quickly return to that web page.

Week 1 Classroom Navigation

Week One Learning Materials
Digital Media and Women's Empowerment (1/3)
An Introduction to Digital Media Concepts (2/3)
Opportunities Provided by Digital Media (3/3)

Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week One Assignment

Helpful Links

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Helpful Tools

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Sidebar Body: 

In addition to the World Pulse online community, here are a few more ways to get started with social media:
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Skype

You can also connect with World Pulse on these platforms, and others!

Classroom Navigation

Week One Learning Materials
Digital Media and Women's Empowerment (1/3)
An Introduction to Digital Media Concepts (2/3)
Opportunities Provided by Digital Media (3/3)

Week One Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Opportunities Provided by Digital Media (3/3)

Digital media and Web 2.0 allow us to connect, express and transform ourselves as we collaborate across oceans, continents and cultural barriers. Stories and projects, once silenced or isolated, are now amplified on a global stage. Below are a few examples of what bold women leaders are doing today with these tools.

Spark Mass Uprising: Egyptian Revolution
By using your blog and digital media to encourage people to attend protests you can help fuel a revolution. In January 2011, Asmaa Mahfouz posted a video on her Facebook page explaining why she was going to join the protest in Tahrir Square scheduled the following week. She also invited her fellow Egyptians to come out and join her. Her online activism and political work through the April 6th Youth Movement and the Coalition of the Youth of the Revolution has propelled her to the list of the World's 500 Most Influential Arabs and helped spark the Egyptian Revolution.

Map of Rape: Women Under Siege
By telling your story of abuse online, you can participate in an action plan to denounce the violence being perpetrated against women throughout the world. In 2012, the Women's Media Center created Women Under Siege, "a journalism project that investigates how rape and other forms of sexualized violence are used as tools in genocide and conflict throughout the 20th century and into the 21st." You can write blog post for Women Under Siege and/or contribute to their maps of violence against women. Their crowd sourcing of women victims of violence, enable the accumulation of knowledge and facts that world leaders will not be able to deny.

Raising Awareness: Torture in Egypt
By self-publishing online, you can speak out with women across the globe to challenge existing ideas or expose under-reported issues in your community. After reading a collection of testimonies from women who were subjected to torture and sexual violence, Noha Atef founded the blog tortureinegypt.net. Her blog has since exposed numerous cases of human rights abuses and censorship in Egypt, provoking public discussion and pressure on the Egyptian government. Visit Torture in Egypt or follow Ms. Atef on Twitter.

Building Movements: Ushahidi
The Internet and mobile phones offer powerful ways to communicate with people around the world that can complement and strengthen on-the-ground community organizing and advocacy. By working online, you can introduce your projects, ideas, and solutions to a global audience and make connections that then support and invigorate your offline work.

A great example of building movements with mobile technology, is Ushahidi. Ushahidi, which means “testimony” in Swahili, was established by Kenyan citizen journalists during the violence following the 2008 Kenyan election. Their website was originally designed to map reports of violence and peace building efforts submitted through the Internet and mobile phones by people on the ground. They had over 45,000 users in Kenya alone when they first launched, and now Ushahidi is making their software and platform available for free to people and organizations around the globe! It has already been used by Al Jazeera during the war in Gaza, in India to help monitor local elections and in Pakistan to map violence. See what you can do with Ushahidi in your country.

Donate Online to Projects Helping Women and Girls: Catapult
When you create a project on Catapult, you increase your chances of finding funds to bring your initiative to life. Catapult was created by Women Deliver, a global advocacy organization bringing together voices from around the world to call for action to improve the health and well-being of girls and women. Catapult is using Web 2.0 to reach potential donors whose financial contributions will help important projects designed to improve the conditions of women and girls in the world.

These are just a few examples of what is possible for citizen journalists and community organizers using Web 2.0.

What will you do with new media and Web 2.0?

Week 1 Classroom Navigation

Week One Learning Materials
Digital Media and Women's Empowerment (1/3)
An Introduction to Digital Media Concepts (2/3)
Opportunities Provided by Digital Media (3/3)

Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week One Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Week One Assignment

Assignment

Write a 500 word or less article that describes:

  • What most excites you about Web 2.0;
  • What solutions you think Web 2.0 brings to the global women's empowerment movement;
  • How are, or can, these tools be empowering for you?

Instructions

  • Your article should be 500 words or fewer.
  • Post your article in your personal journal on World Pulse by April 8th, 2013 at 11:55pm Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)*. To do this, go to your Journal (if you are not already logged in, you will be directed to do so). On the right hand side of the page, there will be an orange button that says "Post to Your Journal". Once you click on this button, you will be able to post your assignment.
  • You may put any title you want on your journal entry, but you MUST copy and paste the following text into the line labeled "Tags": 2013 VOF Week 1

    If you would like tips on how to tag, click here!

  • Get to know your fellow Voices of Our Future applicants on World Pulse online community: visit their profiles, comment on their journal entries, add them as your friends, and explore our online community!

Questions? Please check the Frequently Asked Questions in the sidebar to the left.

Week 1 Classroom Navigation

Week One Learning Materials
Media and Women's Empowerment (1/3)
An Introduction to New Media Concepts (2/3)
Opportunities Provided by New Media (3/3)

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool: make sure you're at or under the limit!

Sidebar Body: 

Week 1 Classroom Navigation

Week One Learning Materials
Digital Media and Women's Empowerment (1/3)
An Introduction to Digital Media Concepts (2/3)
Opportunities Provided by Digital Media (3/3)

Week One Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Where should I post my article?
In your personal journal on World Pulse. Do not post your final assignment in the Voices of Our Future Group journal. This Group is reserved for updates, discussions and questions.

2. When is the assignment due?
The assignments are due on: September 12, September 19, September 26, and October 3 by 11:55pm PDT (Pacific Daylight Time), or GMT-7.
You can check what time this is in your local timezone at the link above.

3. What should I title my assignment?
You can title your assignment anything you want, however you must tag your assignment correctly. Each weekly assignment has specific instruction on how to tag. For instructions on how to tag click here

4. Can I write my story in my native language?
At this time we as that you submit your assignment in English. However, you can use the Google Translation tool, which is at the very top of this page, to help. Click on the "Translate page" tab to find your language. But remember, this is not a perfect tool and there may be mistakes.

5. How will I know if my assignment is 500 words or less?
Word Count Tool is a simple and quick online tool to find your word count. Simply copy and paste your article in the form and click on the Submit button. Your word count will appear under the form.

If you are using Microsoft Word, select the text of your article. Click on Tools in the top menu. Select Word Count from the drop down menu.

6. Who will be reading my assignment?
World Pulse has gathered together an international panel of Listeners, composed of World Pulse staff, community and volunteers. This panel will be reviewing your assignments based on the criteria listed on the Applicants Group page.

You are encouraged to meet the Listeners by visiting their group here63769. Although this group is closed to non-Listeners, you will be able to friend Listeners and stay informed of what is happening "behind the scenes."

7. I still have a question. What do I do?
We encourage you to post your question to the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group, so that all applicants may benefit from your inquiry. We will answer it as fast as we can.

Voices of Our Future Application: Week Two

Personal Stories

Week Two tells the story of World Pulse alongside your story. These learning materials include an introduction to World Pulse's history, our core values that shape our daily work and vision for the future, and our unique editorial cycle.

Week 2 Learning Outcomes and Reading Material

During this week, you will be introduced to:

The Story of World Pulse (1/4)
Our Vision and Values (2/4)
Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)
The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

Once you are done with the 4 readings, access Week Two Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Questions? Please check the Frequently Asked Questions to the left.

Sidebar Body: 

Week 2 Classroom Navigation

Week Two Learning Materials
The Story of World Pulse (1/4)
Our Vision and Values (2/4)
Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)
The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

Week Two Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Where should I post my article?
In your personal journal on World Pulse. Do not post your final assignment in the Voices of Our Future Group journal. This Group is reserved for updates, discussions and questions.

2. When is the assignment due?
The assignments are due on: April 8, April 15, April 22 and April 29 by 11:55pm PDT (Pacific Daylight Time), or GMT-7.
You can check what time this is in your local timezone at this link: Time Zone Converter

3. What should I title my assignment?
You can title your assignment anything you want, however you must tag your assignment correctly. Each weekly assignment has specific instruction on how to tag.

4. Can I write my story in my native language?
At this time we ask that you submit your assignment in English. However, you can use the Google Translation tool, which is at the very top of this page, to help. Click on the "Translate page" tab to find your language. But remember, this is not a perfect tool and there may be mistakes.

5. How will I know if my assignment is 500 words or less?
Word Count Tool is a simple and quick online tool to find your word count. Simply copy and paste your article in the form and click on the Submit button. Your word count will appear under the form.

If you are using Microsoft Word, select the text of your article. Click on Tools in the top menu. Select Word Count from the drop down menu.

6. Who will be reading my assignment?
World Pulse has gathered together an international panel of Listeners, composed of World Pulse staff, community and volunteers. This panel will be reviewing your assignments based on the criteria listed on the Applicants Group page.

You are encouraged to meet the Listeners by visiting their group here. Although this group is closed to non-Listeners, you will be able to friend Listeners and stay informed of what is happening "behind the scenes."

7. I still have a question. What do I do?
We encourage you to post your question to the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group, so that all applicants may benefit from your inquiry. We will answer it as fast as we can.

The Story of World Pulse (1/4)

Bringing Women a Global Voice

World Pulse is an action media network connecting women’s voices to transform our world. We are dedicated to listening to and broadcasting the unheard voices and innovative solutions of women worldwide.
We produce a emagazine as well as host an interactive online community, where women can speak for themselves to the world and connect to solve global problems.

It’s a revolution that has already begun.

Today, women from 190 countries use World Pulse to speak out and connect, using Internet cafés and cell phones from rural villages to urban cities. Their stories are being picked up by the BBC, PBS, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the UN, the Huffington Post, National Geographic and more. By networking on our site, women are finding jobs, starting new programs and businesses, launching women-only cyber cafés, and finding international speaking opportunities that are changing their lives and lifting their communities.

World Pulse has grown from a kitchen table to a global network, partnering with over 40 top international organizations empowering women. The voices of our network are reaching millions worldwide.

World Pulse is a nonprofit social media enterprise headquartered in Portland, OR, USA.

Our History
What started with one VOICE has grown to many.

As a young journalist in Burma and the Amazon, Jensine Larsen discovered that some of the world’s most important stories are rarely mentioned in the mass media. So she began a quest to create a media source that would bring the vital, yet untapped, voices and solutions of women and youth to the world stage.

In 2003, at age 28, Larsen founded World Pulse as a nonprofit media organization in order to launch a bold and beautiful new magazine, one that would cut to the heart of global problems through the eyes of women and highlight solutions already underway.

The premiere issue of World Pulse Magazine debuted in 2004. Thousands of individuals and grassroots organizations took notice. Newsstand sales were double the average for new publications, and the magazine was nominated for "Best International Coverage" and "Best New Title" of 2004 and 2005 by the Independent Press Awards.

In the wake of this overwhelming response, we began working with teams of professional advisers, a deeply dedicated staff, international journalists, photojournalist networks, an Editorial Guide Council, and thousands of founding subscribers and donors from around the world.

In 2007, our eyes turned to the future of communications technology in the developing world, and we began to pioneer the development of our online community.

World Pulse online community is an interactive online community enabling women worldwide—even those just coming online using Internet cafes and cell phones—to speak for themselves to the world and solve global problems.

Today, World Pulse has grown into an international network connecting women and men across borders and building a rising pulse of women’s empowerment across the globe.

Why Women?
Women and girls are the answer.

The global balance is shifting: women are shaping the future of our communities and nations. In fact, most international institutions and organizations agree that empowering women and girls is the fastest way to solve world problems. It’s a movement that is centered around solutions rather than blame. It’s a movement that’s already begun and World Pulse is here to broadcast their voices around the globe.

Including women’s voices benefits our world.

When women's voices are equally heard and supported in the media, it results in increased family and child well being, more investment in education and health care, better economic growth and job creation, as well as proper transparency and accountability. It accelerates social healing after trauma, as well as information sharing and problem-solving. Most importantly, it strengthens community networks, environmental stewardship, and the democratic process, as well as arts, culture, and creativity.

Week 2 Classroom Navigation

Week Two Learning Materials
The Story of World Pulse (1/4)
Our Vision and Values (2/4)
Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)
The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

Once you are done with the 4 readings, access Week Two Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool
Sidebar Body: 

Jensine Larsen

Founder, World Pulse

When I was a young girl, I would lie on my stomach on sun-warmed grass covering the hills of Southern Wisconsin and absorb stories. I was shy and preferred to run away from the ordinary chaos of our family’s old farmhouse into the ancient rolling fields. As long as I can remember, I have always wanted to “see” the truths of the human experience and the burning questions that would carry me to the last page of the story were “What now?” “What is the way forward?”

Read Jensine's full story

Classroom Navigation

Week Two Learning Materials
The Story of World Pulse (1/4)
Our Vision and Values (2/4)
Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)
The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

Week Two Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Our Vision and Values (2/4)

Our Values

Through our seven founding values, World Pulse has created a network for women, a platform for change, and a sanctuary for those who have been silent.

Through our Voices, we are able to create a new world.

With Courage we create Possibility.

With Beauty we Innovate the world.

Through Connections, we Transform our world.

What We Do

World Pulse is an action media network powered by women from 190 countries. Through our programs, we lift and unite women’s voices to accelerate their impact for the world.

By connecting women through digital technology, we bring women’s voices out of the shadows and on to the world stage.

We Bring Women a Global Voice

Our online community is a sanctuary where every woman with access to the Internet can be heard and connect with women across the world to solve global problems. New ideas and solutions rise from the ground up as women speak out from remote regions and hot spots via Internet cafés or cell phones.

We Magnify the Power of Women's Voices

Our editorial desk and digital action campaigns promote the most powerful community voices and community solutions to major media outlets and influential forums. We vet, package, and channel women’s stories—in their own words—to forums like CNN, the Huffington Post, the UN, and the U.S. Department of State.

We Equip Women with Tools to be Vocal Agents of Change

We equip grassroots women to become empowered leaders and vocal agents of change through our annual online citizen journalism and digital empowerment training program called “Voices of Our Future.” Each correspondent is matched with a professional vision mentor and editorial mentor who support her to develop her vision. World Pulse publishes their stories and three correspondents are selected each year to travel to the US for our nation-wide speaking and media tour, World Pulse LIVE.

Our Vision: A Vocal Uprising

In collaboration with our partners, we are building the world’s leading action media network, powered by millions of women who are transmitting local and global change from every region of the world.

It’s a revolution that has already begun.

Week 2 Classroom Navigation

Week Two Learning Materials
The Story of World Pulse (1/4)
Our Vision and Values (2/4)
Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)
The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

Once you are done with the 4 readings, access Week Two Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)

Editorial Guidelines
As you contemplate your weekly assignments, keep in mind the vision, mission, and editorial voice of World Pulse.

World Pulse’s editorial voice is unique. We are founded on the belief that there is a world of untapped knowledge, innovation, and vision held by the women of the earth. We cover global issues through the eyes of women and look for stories that are solutions-oriented, timely, and that demonstrate the collective power of women globally.

Our editors look at community content and consider them for publication on our Magazine page. We also push these stories out to major media forums such as the Huffington Post, National Geographic, and Reuters.

We favor stories that emphasize creativity, courage, innovation, restoration, efficiency, transition, transformation, and collaboration. We are far more likely to publish a piece that illustrates a relationship to the larger landscape of global social change. For example, we are not likely to publish a story on an orphanage for trafficked children in Cambodia. However, we may consider publishing a story that highlights a growing network of care centers for children throughout Cambodia, or a global phenomenon of "polyclinics" of hope for trafficked children.

For a great example of solutions-oriented writing, check out Leah Auma Okeyo’s story on the left side of your screen.

Our editors are always active online searching for new content and emerging voices, and we ask that our writers engage with the community. So remember, even if you are not chosen for one of the limited places in the Voices of Our Future program, you still have the opportunity to be published on World Pulse. We encourage you to discover World Pulse and our online community. Get to know your fellow applicants and some of the 17,000 other members. Check out groups like the Ending Gender Based Violence, or The Nigerian Cafe, and see what topics the community is talking about. Find out what is important to other women out there, and add your ideas to the conversation!

Week 2 Classroom Navigation

Week Two Learning Materials
The Story of World Pulse (1/4)
Our Vision and Values (2/4)
Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)
The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

Once you are done with the 4 readings, access Week Two Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool
Sidebar Body: 

Leah Auma Okeyo

First-ever Grassroots Correspondent for World Pulse

Two years ago I was dying from AIDS. My story starts here...

In my impoverished Kenyan town, news travels through word of mouth. After I heard about a new interactive community website for women that could possibly help my mission of caring for women with HIV, I decided to make the long trek to the local internet café - often dodging bullets in post-conflict Kenya- to share my story.

Read Leah's full story

Classroom Navigation

Week Two Learning Materials
The Story of World Pulse (1/4)
Our Vision and Values (2/4)
Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)
The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

Week Two Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

THE SOUL OF WORLD PULSE

Let us be a loudspeaker
for women of the world.

Let us call forth voice
where before there was silence.

Let us stand back while they speak up,
for their words are so beautiful they
need no adornment.

Let us be their platform, their forum,
their safe haven, their sanctuary,
an amplifier no one can ignore.

Let us create a world where women are
not only free, but empowered so greatly
as to be unstoppable.

A world where women can
transform her life as well as the lives of those
around her by simply raising her voice.

One voice at a time, millions of voices strong.

Until the sound is so deafening, the whole
world will hear their music.

It’s not just a dream—it’s a revolution
that has already begun.

This is the pulse that transforms the world.

THIS IS WORLD PULSE.

You are a part of the Pulse.

Listen to The Soul Of World Pulse

Week 2 Classroom Navigation

Week Two Learning Materials
The Story of World Pulse (1/4)
Our Vision and Values (2/4)
Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)
The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

Once you are done with the 4 readings, access Week Two Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Week Two Assignment

Assignment

Tell your personal story. Describe the journey that led you to our online community and inspired you to apply for Voices of Our Future. How does this journey fit into your personal vision for the future?

Instructions

  • Your story should be fewer than 500 words.
  • Post your article in your personal journal on World Pulse by April 15th, 2013 at 11:55pm Pacific Daylight Time (PDT).* To do this, go to your Journal (if you are not already logged in, you will be directed to do so). On the right hand side of the page, there will be an orange button that says "Post to Your Journal". Once you click on this button, you will be able to post your assignment.
  • You may put any title you want on your journal entry, but it MUST be tagged with the following (you can cut and paste the text that follows): 2013 VOF Week 2

    If you would like tips on how to tag, click here!

  • Get to know your fellow Voices of Our Future applicants on World Pulse online community: visit their profiles, comment on their journal entries, add them as your friends, and explore our online community!

Extra Credit

NOT REQUIRED BUT HIGHLY ENCOURAGED:

World Pulse wants to foster your creativity and hear your voice through poetry!

Poetry is a powerful way to paint a vivid picture for the reader. It offers ways to connect with people with very different lives and experiences than yours. The last reading for Week 2 Assignment was the poem titled The Soul of World Pulse. Our poem highlights our vision for the future and a call to action to connect with one another and engage in the revolution.

We invite you to write a poem about your unique vision for your future and the larger global community. We are particularly interested in themes of overcoming and resilience. Poetry can come in many different forms. We are looking to hear your voice, poems that contain humor are also encourage. While this is NOT required and will not be evaluated, it allows us to explore a different writing avenue with you.

Examples:

Delphine's poem:
read
listen

Zoe's poem:
read
listen

The guidelines for submission are loose. Poetry can be impactful whether long or short. We are hoping to get to know your writing style in a less formal way. Your poems can contain humor if you so choose. Please feel free to get as creative with your writing as you would like. Follow this link if you would like some helpful hints on how to write a poem.

Please tag your poem in your journal as: 2013 VOF Poetry

Questions? Please check the Frequently Asked Questions in the sidebar to the left.

Week 2 Classroom Navigation

Week Two Learning Materials
The Story of World Pulse (1/4)
Our Vision and Values (2/4)
Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)
The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

Once you are done with the 4 readings, access Week Two Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool
Sidebar Body: 

Week 2 Classroom Navigation

Week Two Learning Materials
The Story of World Pulse (1/4)
Our Vision and Values (2/4)
Our Editorial Cycle (3/4)
The Soul of World Pulse (4/4)

Week Two Assignment

Helpful Links

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Helpful Tools

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Where should I post my article?
In your personal journal on PulseWire. Do not post your final assignment in the Voices of Our Future Group journal. This Group is reserved for updates, discussions and questions.

2. When is the assignment due?
The assignments are due on: April 8, April 15, April 22 and April 29 by 11:55pm PDT (Pacific Daylight Time), or GMT-7.
You can check what time this is in your local timezone at this link: Time Zone Converter

3. What should I title my assignment?
You can title your assignment anything you want, however you must tag your assignment correctly. Each weekly assignment has specific instruction on how to tag.

4. Can I write my story in my native language?
At this time we as that you submit your assignment in English. However, you can use the Google Translation tool, which is at the very top of this page, to help. Click on the "Translate page" tab to find your language. But remember, this is not a perfect tool and there may be mistakes.

5. How will I know if my assignment is 500 words or less?
Word Count Tool is a simple and quick online tool to find your word count. Simply copy and paste your article in the form and click on the Submit button. Your word count will appear under the form.

If you are using Microsoft Word, select the text of your article. Click on Tools in the top menu. Select Word Count from the drop down menu.

6. Who will be reading my assignment?
World Pulse has gathered together an international panel of Listeners, composed of World Pulse staff, community and volunteers. This panel will be reviewing your assignments based on the criteria listed on the Applicants Group page.

You are encouraged to meet the Listeners by visiting their group here. Although this group is closed to non-Listeners, you will be able to friend Listeners and stay informed of what is happening "behind the scenes."

7. I still have a question. What do I do?
We encourage you to post your question to the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group, so that all applicants may benefit from your inquiry. We will answer it as fast as we can.

Voices of Our Future Application: Week Three

Online Activity

In Week Three, you'll be introduced to the basics of engaging an online community and how to share resources and solutions to transform your community and your life. The learning materials include tips on how to amplify your voice by using your World Pulse journal, become an active community member, share your solutions with a global audience, offer your resources, or ask for what you need. Some of this information is already in our online community Getting Started Guide. If you haven’t already read through that document, we suggest you do!

Classroom Navigation

Week Three Learning Materials
Community Leader Toolkit (1/3)
Resource Exchange (2/3)
Digital Action Campaigns (3/3)

Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week Three Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Questions? Please check the Frequently Asked Questions to the left.

Sidebar Body: 

Classroom Navigation

Week Three Learning Materials
Community Leader Toolkit (1/3)
Resource Exchange (2/3)
Digital Action Campaigns (3/3)

Week Three Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Where should I post my article?
In your personal journal on World Pulse. Do not post your final assignment in the Voices of Our Future Group journal. This Group is reserved for updates, discussions and questions.

2. When is the assignment due?
The assignments are due on: April 8, April 15, April 22 and April 29 by 11:55pm PDT (Pacific Daylight Time), or GMT-7.
You can check what time this is in your local timezone at this link: Time Zone Converter

3. What should I title my assignment?
You can title your assignment anything you want, however you must tag your assignment correctly. Each weekly assignment has specific instruction on how to tag.

4. Can I write my story in my native language?
At this time we ask that you submit your assignment in English. However, you can use the Google Translation tool, which is at the very top of this page, to help. Click on the "Translate page" tab to find your language. But remember, this is not a perfect tool and there may be mistakes.

5. How will I know if my assignment is 500 words or less?
Word Count Tool is a simple and quick online tool to find your word count. Simply copy and paste your article in the form and click on the Submit button. Your word count will appear under the form.

If you are using Microsoft Word, select the text of your article. Click on Tools in the top menu. Select Word Count from the drop down menu.

6. Who will be reading my assignment?
World Pulse has gathered together an international panel of Listeners, composed of World Pulse staff, community members and volunteers. This panel will be reviewing your assignments based on the criteria listed on the Applicants Group page.

You are encouraged to meet the Listeners by visiting their group here. Although this group is closed to non-Listeners, you will be able to friend Listeners and stay informed of what is happening "behind the scenes."

7. I still have a question. What do I do?
We encourage you to post your question to the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group, so that all applicants may benefit from your inquiry. We will answer it as fast as we can.

Community Leader Toolkit (1/3)

As a Voices Of Our Future applicant you are invited to take a leadership role in the World Pulse community. Some of you have already been active in dialoguing with members and some of you are just getting started! World Pulse brings people from around the world together into one community to empower women and create global change. Think of each community member as a neighbor whom you can ask for advice, reach out to for support, and collaborate with to take action.

In this section we will offer you some ideas on how to engage with the World Pulse community. By sparking dialogue on issues that concern you, sharing opportunities and lessons, welcoming new members and helping to point them in the right direction, you can build a leadership role in our community of grassroots women leaders from around the world. In this way, you will be able to build a network of support and inspiration for your work and help deepen the impact grassroots women leaders can have in people's lives, communities, and globally.

Sparking Dialogue

One of the most exciting things about World Pulse is the ability for women from all corners of the world to connect on common ground, dissolving barriers of geography, culture, and language. More than ever before, you can now develop personal connections with women thousands of miles away. Last year we created a World Pulse video. Watch to gain further understanding of the power behind becoming part of World Pulse.

Every year we produce six editions of our emagazine. All of our stories are hand selected by our Editorial Department from the voices in our World Pulse community. Our editors are always active on the site, combing through community submissions. All VOF assignments have the opportunity to become a part of our editorial workflow, where our editors polish, vet, and authenticate stories and then push them out to our media partners, including the Gates Foundation’s Impatient Optimist blog, the Huffington Post, National Geographic, CNN iReport, and Reuters. We also work with a number of NGOs to channel stories directly to their sites. Read the most current March 2013 edition of World Pulse emagazine.

As a new member to World Pulse, we encourage you to participate in our monthly Call for Submissions. Your writing has the potential to be produced in our next edition. This month we are calling for submissions on Maternal Health.

Every year, approximately 287,000 girls and women die from pregnancy-related causes. Are you aware of innovative solutions to maternal mortality that you want to see shared and replicated? If you have a perspective on maternal health issues in your community, we want to hear from you! We are partnering with Women Deliver to raise the volume on voices speaking out for maternal health.

Share your story in our online community and add the tag "Maternal Health" to your journal to be considered for publication. If you have any questions about the process please contact editor@worldpulse.com.

There are several ways you can show support and leadership as people become part of World Pulse:

Become a Welcomer: Our goal is to make World Pulse as supportive, interactive and collaborative as possible. Welcomers play a vital role in being the first point of contact, welcoming our new members to our global community. Remember when you first joined World Pulse and received an introductory message or comment on your journal from one of our members? That was a Welcomer! You are not required to become a Welcomer, but it is a great way to contribute to our supportive environment and meet new people. If you would like to do this, please follow the directions below:

First, create your own unique style for welcoming new members to World Pulse. Try to make your message personal by making note of something the new member indicated about their work or passions in their introduction.. Here is an example of a welcoming message to new members:

Dear (name),
Welcome to World Pulse! You are now part of a thriving community of grassroots women leaders and supporters from 190 countries. See the World Pulse Getting Started Guide to learn more about networking in our community: http://www.worldpulse.com/pulsewire/about/guide

I look forward to hearing your voice in the community!
In friendship,
(your name)

You can find new members in our Member Directory, where most recent members will appear first. When a new member first fills out their profile, this information will be the basis of their first journal entry, allowing you to comment. When you click on a member profile, underneath their picture is a list of most recent posts. Click on the introductory journal and add your comment to welcome them to the community! You can also find their introductory journals in the Voices Rising section.

If a member hasn’t yet filled out their profile, you can welcome them by sending a private message. Click on the white envelope next to their profile picture that says “send a private message”.

Concentrate on members who have not been welcomed by at least 1-2 people yet. Our goal is that each new member is welcomed by 2-3 people at least. This is a task that can be completed any time of day – and as much or as little as you’re available to spend on it.

By becoming a Welcomer you have the opportunity to…

  • Network! If you see new members that you share interests with, introduce yourself and welcome them! A personal connection can make someone feel welcome in the community, especially if you are willing to share your personal story or experiences. If someone intrigues you, encourage them to share their perspective by asking questions and expressing your interest.
  • Tap into community wisdom.What better way is there to start a conversation than by asking a question? You can pose questions to people as comments on their Journal posts, in your own Journal, or as a Group post. Questions are great for probing a little deeper and help to reveal insights the writer may have originally held back. Creating conversations is such an important part of Web 2.0. Try dedicating an Internet session to responding to other bloggers or following up on comments to your posts to encourage dialogue and find out about other people's lives, issues, and projects.
  • Join a Group. World Pulse Groups are great places for people to gather for discussion. We encourage you to actively involve yourself by posting a journal to introduce yourself, bring up discussion points or questions, share insight, personal experiences or innovative solutions on the group topic. If the group seems inactive, it might just need a kick-start! You can access a full list of groups on World Pulse at the Groups Directory. To post to the group journal, you must click on the “contribute” tab.

Online Community Leadership Program

Here at World Pulse, we recognize that you are leaders not only on the ground in your communities, but in the World Pulse online community as well. The World Pulse Community Leadership roles recognize and support leadership and initiative taken by World Pulse members to engage online. Each role is represented by a badge, which appears on one’s profile and posts.
Click here to learn more about our Online Community Leadership Program.

Below are some suggested activities for getting started as a community leader! Together we can expand our networks! You are not required to do the following, we just wanted to give you some useful tips:

  • Ask five of your friends to join World Pulse .
  • Post to the Resource Exchange or, look through offers for funding opportunities and other resources you need for your work.
  • Join a group and kick-start a conversation by posting a question.
  • Comment on five member's journals that encourage the author to deepen the dialogue. Show your support, ask questions, and get the conversation going!

Classroom Navigation

Week Three Learning Materials
Community Leader Toolkit (1/3)
Resource Exchange (2/3)
Digital Action Campaigns (3/3)

Once you are done with the three readings, access Week Three Assignment

Helpful Links

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Helpful Tools

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Resource Exchange (2/3)

The ResourceExChange bulletin board was created by World Pulse for the World Pulse community to exchange goods and services. The ResourceExChange functions on the principles of generosity and integrity, and each individual who uses the ResourceExChange is bound to the World Pulse Terms of Service. You can post all kinds of different needs and offers: opportunities, funding, marketplace, language, information sharing, supplies,mentoring and training, travel and transport, communications technology, and more.

When working on a project it is easy to be overwhelmed by what you feel that you need in order to succeed. Think of the ResourceExChange as a global community bulletin board where you can ask for what you need and offer your services to other World Pulse members.
You may first want to start by making a list of your current resources: supportive neighbors, a friend who can help you design a flyer, or another friend who always has great ideas who can help your fundraiser. When you have finished this list, make another list with everything you need.

Are there specific tasks someone may be able to help you accomplish? Do you need someone to offer feedback on your grant proposal? Do you need to know how to lead a public discussion exposing human trafficking in your own city? Do you need help transporting supplies or building a website? Post your needs in ResourceExChange

For example... recently World Pulse Member Zoneziwoh applied for a $1000 award through DAWNS our ResourceExChange. DAWNS is a mission-driven enterprise to help lower the barriers to compelling humanitarian storytelling. Since launching its service a year ago the organization has given away three storytelling grants, totaling $1,500. Zoneziwoh applied and then posted in her journal asking for the World Pulse community to give her support. Her fellow World Pulse sisters and brothers supported her efforts and she won the award!

The idea that investing in women is the key to ending global poverty, is catching like wildfire. And as a communications platform for this movement, people are coming to World Pulse looking to get involved and invest in grassroots women leaders worldwide, because they know that you hold the key. When they reach out to our ResourceExchange it is likely to be someone that can offer advice or expertise. For example… you could post a "Need" for supplies - like sanitary napkins or medical instruments. Maybe you are looking for volunteers to staff a clinic. You can make a post for that too! Whatever your needs are, we suggest that you includes as much information as possible. The more someone can connect with you and understand your vision, the more likely you are to get support.

And don't forget to post your offers! Susanna runs an artisan cooperative in Otovalo, Ecuador. She's always looking for fair trade businesses to work with. We recommend she create an "Offer" in the Resource Exchange for "Business Opportunity: Fair-Trade Ecuadorian Pottery by Women Artisans". She's also holding an artisan workshop for visitors to learn the traditional art of weaving. She could post an "Offer" for "Traditional Weaving Workshops in Otovalo, Ecuador."

Classroom Navigation

Week Three Learning Materials
Community Leader Toolkit (1/3)
Resource Exchange (2/3)
Digital Action Campaigns (3/3)

Once you are done with the three readings, access Week Three Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Digital Action Campaigns (3/3)

World Pulse believes that grassroots women leaders hold the key to solutions for transforming their communities. Yet, grassroots women’s voices are continually excluded at the negotiating and drafting table where policies are made.

We have witnessed our community of grassroots leaders vocalize their readiness to bring forward solutions, and represent their communities in both international media coverage and at the highest levels of decision-making.

Thus, World Pulse developed a methodology to rally our community’s voices around the issues that they say matter most. Our digital action campaigns elicit powerful content from women on the ground, strengthen her confidence and empowered leadership, and ensure that influencers and powerful institutions hear women’s perspectives.

Visit our 2012 initiative, Ending Violence Against Women Digital Action Campaign to learn how World Pulse delivered grassroots women's testimonies, solutions, and visions on ending gender-based violence to influential forums.

As a result of this campaign, there was a total of 153 voices collected from the front lines of the global struggle against gender-based violence. In March, World Pulse's correspondent Chi Yvonne Leina and board member Zulma Miranda took their seats at the 57th UN Commission on the Status of Women to deliver World Pulse voices to top leaders and influencers.

We also had a regional focus on the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Democratic Republic of Congo was recently dubbed 'a never-ending nightmare' by the New York Times, but over 200 Congolese grassroots women leaders—self-identified as the Maman Shujaa, or 'Hero Women'—have emerged from the shadows to organize a movement denouncing violence and demanding peace. Together they have gathered over 100,000 signatures demanding that their voices be heard. Requesting that US woman leaders Hillary Clinton, Susan Rice, Valerie Jarrett, and Michelle Obama to take immediate action in solidarity with the women of the Congo. They asked for the immediate appointment of a special presidential envoy to work with the African Union and United Nations to forge a peace process that addresses both the immediate crisis and the underlying longer-term economic and political interests of the parties involved. On January 29th, 2013 we helped deliver their voices to the White House.

The Maman Shujaa have utilized our platform to request a voice in the decisions that affect their lives, and the world is taking notice. At the 20th African Union Summit, Hero Women Neema Namadamu and Jeanette Ruhebuza took their seats at the summit table. We invite you to experience their journey, grasp their vision, and meet the new faces of Congo. World Pulse partner Alliance for the Earth traveled to DRC to connect directly with the Maman Shujaa. In this video you can witness first hand the women's rising leadership and their compelling visions for change.

This year you have the opportunity to participate in our Girls Transform the World: Access to Education Digital Action Campaign. Read submissions from other community members, and learn how your voice will be transformed for impact.

Why Is Girls' Education So Important?

Why Girls?

  • Worldwide, girls make up the majority of children not in school
    UNESCO
  • In developing countries, only 43 percent of secondary-school-age girls are in class
    UNICEF
  • There are still 17 countries where girls enrollment is less than 90% the enrollment of boys
    UNESCO, 2012
  • In every country young women often lose confidence in their abilities. Girls in the US scored 20% lower on a test when asked to indicate their gender
    Gender Identification, Schmader
  • Social and cultural barriers still exist, steering women away from STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields. The mass culture, including television, continues to message middle school and high school girls that it's better to be pretty than smart.
    Molly Weinburgh

Why Education?

With quality education and mentorship, girls transform...

Economies

  • Wages rise 20% for every year beyond the 4th grade that girls attend school
    Basic Education Coalition
  • When 10% more of its girls go to school, a country’s GDP increases by an average of 3%
    Council on Foreign Relations
  • There would be a 12% drop in global poverty if all students in low-income countries left school with basic reading skills
    UNESCO
  • In sub-Saharan Africa investing in girls’ education has the potential to boost agricultural output by 25%
    International Food Policy Research Institute
  • In Latin America, education explains 42% of the increase in female labor force participation since 1975
    World Bank

Families

  • When a girl goes to school, she will re-invest 90% of her income into her family
    Nike Foundation, The Girl Effect
  • When a girl in the developing world receives seven or more years of education she marries four years later and has 2.2 fewer children.
    UN Population Fund, 1990
  • Girls with secondary schooling are up to six times less likely to be married as children than those with little or no schooling
    Population Reference Bureau
  • In Mozambique, some 60 percent of girls with no education are married by 18, compared to 10 percent of girls with secondary schooling and less than one percent of girls with higher education
    ICRW

Communities

  • Every extra year of schooling reduces infant mortality by up to 10 percent
    Population Reference Bureau
  • Women with an education are five times more likely to have basic information about HIV/AIDS
    UNFPA
  • Each additional year of schooling for a population reduces the chance of a country falling into civil war by 3.6
    USAID

Why now?

  • The UN Millenium Development Goals targets 2015 for children everywhere, boys and girls alike, to be able to complete a full course of primary schooling
    UN Dept of Public Information
  • Despite great strides in many countries, in 2010 there were still 61 million children of primary school age and 71 million young adolescents out of school
    UN Millenium Development Goals
  • In more than 100 countries, school is not free and many parents cannot afford the tuition or the cost of uniforms
    Day of the Girl
  • Millions of girls worldwide need us to raise our collective voice to demand they have the opportunity to fulfill their potential

Delivering Your Voices to Influencers Worldwide

World Pulse invites you to join us in speaking out for the rights of girls as we showcase the voices and solutions of grassroots women around the world. We believe that when girls and their champions are heard, they will transform the world.

Over the next six months there will be several opportunities to be engaged with young women and their supporters in bringing voice to this topic.

Why Participate?

Your voice will be heard – You will connect – Your voice will be elevated

  • Make Like-Minded Connections: Share your story and connect with others in similar situations.
  • Learn and Be Inspired: Read others’ stories, learn about other experiences, and gain inspiration.
  • Explore Solutions: Find out how others climbed over, dug under, or broke through their barriers, and hear their visions for the future.
  • Transform: Watch your story find its way to places you never thought imaginable. Watch it make impact.

Classroom Navigation

Week Three Learning Materials
Community Leader Toolkit (1/3)
Resource Exchange (2/3)
Digital Action Campaigns (3/3)

Once you are done with the three readings, access Week Three Assignment

Helpful Links

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Helpful Tools

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Week Three Assignment

Assignment

Girls’ Access to Education. The Barriers. The Solutions.

Tell us your personal testimony—either experienced or witnessed—and your vision for improving the lives of girls in your community.

Tell us about the barriers you faced as a young woman or that girls in your community face when accessing education and solutions you’ve found in overcoming them:

  • What do you believe is the greatest challenge girls confront in your community to accessing an education?
  • Describe the barriers that prevent you or young women in your community from accessing education. For example: cultural biases or micro-inequities, lack of respect for women, economic constraints, lack of mentors, lack of confidence, or others.
  • What impact do you believe these barriers to education have had on yourself, your family, or community?
  • How have you or others been able to overcome these barriers?

    Follow the steps below to ensure that your story is properly submitted to Voices of Our Future Application AND Campaigns (Campaigns is optional) which will be included in World Pulse’s advocacy package, which will be presented at key international forums.

Instructions

  • Write a 500-800 word or less article
  • Post your article in your personal journal on World Pulse by April 22nd, 2013 at 11:55pm Pacific Daylight Time (PDT).* To do this, go to your Journal (if you are not already logged in, you will be directed to do so). On the right hand side of the page, there will be an orange button that says "Post to Your Journal". Once you click on this button, you will be able to post your assignment.
  • You may put any title you want on your journal entry, but it MUST be tagged with the following (you can cut and paste the text that follows): 2013 VOF Week 3 AND check the box titled Digital Action Campaigns - Girls Transform the World if you want your voice to be included in the campaign and delivered to influential forums.

Classroom Navigation

Week Three Learning Materials
Community Leader Toolkit (1/3)
Resource Exchange (2/3)
Digital Action Campaigns (3/3)

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Questions? Please check the Frequently Asked Questions to the left.

Sidebar Body: 

Classroom Navigation

Week Three Learning Materials
Community Leader Toolkit (1/3)
Resource Exchange (2/3)
Action Alerts and Global Events (3/3)

Week Three Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Where should I post my article?
In your personal journal on World Pulse. Do not post your final assignment in the Voices of Our Future Group journal. This Group is reserved for updates, discussions and questions.

2. When is the assignment due?
The assignments are due on: April 8, April 15, April 22 and April 29 by 11:55pm PDT (Pacific Daylight Time), or GMT-7.
You can check what time this is in your local timezone at this link: Time Zone Converter

3. What should I title my assignment?
You can title your assignment anything you want, however you must tag your assignment correctly. Each weekly assignment has specific instruction on how to tag.

4. Can I write my story in my native language?
At this time we ask that you submit your assignment in English. However, you can use the Google Translation tool, which is at the very top of this page, to help. Click on the "Translate page" tab to find your language. But remember, this is not a perfect tool and there may be mistakes.

5. How will I know if my assignment is 500 words or less?
Word Count Tool is a simple and quick online tool to find your word count. Simply copy and paste your article in the form and click on the Submit button. Your word count will appear under the form.

If you are using Microsoft Word, select the text of your article. Click on Tools in the top menu. Select Word Count from the drop down menu.

6. Who will be reading my assignment?
World Pulse has gathered together an international panel of Listeners, composed of World Pulse staff, community members and volunteers. This panel will be reviewing your assignments based on the criteria listed on the Applicants Group page.

You are encouraged to meet the Listeners by visiting their group here. Although this group is closed to non-Listeners, you will be able to friend Listeners and stay informed of what is happening "behind the scenes."

7. I still have a question. What do I do?
We encourage you to post your question to the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group, so that all applicants may benefit from your inquiry. We will answer it as fast as we can.

Voices of Our Future Application: Week Four

World Pulse Vision Mentor Methodology and The Divine Feminine

In Week Four, we will share with you the World Pulse Vision Mentor Methodology and excerpts from “Returning to My Mother’s House: Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine” by Gail Straub, co-founder of the Empowerment Institute. You will learn about our unique methodology for supporting change leaders, and ways you can take back your feminine power.

Week 4 Learning Outcomes and Reading Material

During this week, you will be introduced to:

Vision Mentor Framework (1/3)
Losing Innate Female Wisdom (2/3)
Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine (3/3)

Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week Four Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Questions? Please check the Frequently Asked Questions to the left.

Sidebar Body: 

Classroom Navigation

Week 4 Learning Materials
Vision Mentor Framework (1/3)
Losing Innate Female Wisdom (2/3)
Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine (3/3)

Week Four Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Where should I post my article?
In your personal journal on World Pulse. Do not post your final assignment in the Voices of Our Future Group journal. This Group is reserved for updates, discussions and questions.

2. When is the assignment due?
The assignments are due on: April 8, April 15, April 22 and April 29 by 11:55pm PDT (Pacific Daylight Time), or GMT-7.
You can check what time this is in your local timezone at this link: Time Zone Converter

3. What should I title my assignment?
You can title your assignment anything you want, however you must tag your assignment correctly. Each weekly assignment has specific instruction on how to tag.

4. Can I write my story in my native language?
At this time we ask that you submit your assignment in English. However, you can use the Google Translation tool, which is at the very top of this page, to help. Click on the "Translate page" tab to find your language. But remember, this is not a perfect tool and there may be mistakes.

5. How will I know if my assignment is 500 words or less?
Word Count Tool is a simple and quick online tool to find your word count. Simply copy and paste your article in the form and click on the Submit button. Your word count will appear under the form.

If you are using Microsoft Word, select the text of your article. Click on Tools in the top menu. Select Word Count from the drop down menu.

6. Who will be reading my assignment?
World Pulse has gathered together an international panel of Listeners, composed of World Pulse staff, community and volunteers. This panel will be reviewing your assignments based on the criteria listed on the Applicants Group page.

You are encouraged to meet the Listeners by visiting their group here. Although this group is closed to non-Listeners, you will be able to friend Listeners and stay informed of what is happening "behind the scenes."

7. I still have a question. What do I do?
We encourage you to post your question to the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group, so that all applicants may benefit from your inquiry. We will answer it as fast as we can.

Vision Mentor Framework (1/3)

We Believe Women Will Transform The World-- But first, we must transform ourselves.

All of us face hurdles in finding time for ourselves, engaging in the activities we find fulfilling, and having the courage to go after our dreams. For grassroots women leaders who are often living in the very situations we seek to change, these challenges are magnified. We fill our days struggling for the rights of women and men in our communities, but rarely do we have someone to support us, to share the burden and cheer us on.

By applying for Voices of Our Future and signing up for our online community, you have decided to join an outspoken community for change. But how do you go about achieving your dreams, taking care of yourself, and beginning or continuing your work as an empowered change leader?

World Pulse believes that having someone to support you is key to achieving your potential. Each woman who participates in the five-month training program will be paired with a personal Vision Mentor. We will select 30 outstanding professional women with experience in mentoring and coaching with a global lens, who will help provide the support and care that change leaders often give their communities, but lack themselves. Vision Mentors can act as another pair of ears to listen to our worries, our ideas, and help us clarify our visions and take action.

Although we wish we could pair every woman who applies to this program with a Vision Mentor, we are thrilled to provide you with a short introduction to our Vision Mentor framework. If you would like to find someone to help support you on your journey, we suggest you check out the Mentorship and Training section of our Resource Exchange.

Vision Mentor: Witness, Listener, Catalyst Nurturer

In listening to these deep challenges that grassroots women face, World Pulse has created a network of Vision Mentors to champion, nurture, catalyze, challenge and support our Correspondents throughout the program. We are redefining the traditional notion of mentoring as “power bestowed” to “power from within.”

What do we mean by this? Mentoring has often been thought of as a one-way street, with the mentor “bestowing” or giving their knowledge, skills and experience to their mentee. We believe this traditional view is too hierarchical and does not recognize that each of us has what it takes to achieve our dreams within us; and that mentors benefit from the learning and experience of their mentees as well. Therefore, we are piloting a model of mentoring that is focused on creating a transformational partnership that will support each Correspondent in vocalizing and activating her vision for change. Our four principals for transformational partnership are: Witnessing, Listening, Catalyzing and Nurturing.

As Witnesses, Vision Mentors:

  • Contract with their Correspondent as a skillful expert and open learner committed to clear, reciprocal benefits of a mutually fulfilling partnership.
  • Witness and reflect their Correspondent’s life story, her wisdom, imagination and gifts that will build her confidence as an “author” of her own voice.
  • Act as a “vision keeper.” Whatever the circumstances and context that may arise, ensure consistency and presence as a partner in helping their Correspondent realize her vision.

As a Listener, Vision Mentors:

  • Provide deep support to their Correspondent to stay safe, overcome personal barriers and complete the program.
  • Listen for their Correspondent’s unique voice and inquire about what is unsaid--what may be silenced or hidden.
  • Be a guardian of the Correspondent’s truths as a non-judgmental listener.

As a Catalyst, Vision Mentors:

  • Balance accountability, support and challenge, staying focused but being flexible to realities of each Correspondent.
  • Ensure their Correspondent initiates, asks for and seeks external resources, community and connection to achieve her vision.
  • Crystallize the key learnings of the Voices of Our Future program while sustaining a long term view of Correspondent’s personal and professional vision.

As a Nurturer, Vision Mentors:

  • Nurture the Correspondent and her vision across cultures, generations and differences through empathy, deep rapport, compassion, humility and a spirit of mutual discovery.
  • Support the Correspondent’s self-care practices to balance social activism with reflection, health and resiliency as an inspiration and role model to her family and community.

Week 4 Classroom Navigation

Week 4 Learning Materials
Vision Mentor Framework (1/3)
Losing Innate Female Wisdom (2/3)
Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine (3/3)

Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week Four Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Losing Innate Female Wisdom (2/3)

Gail Straub, co-founder of the Empowerment Institute and a key Voices of Our Future program partner in 2009 and 2010, recently wrote her memoir, My Mother’s House: Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine. Many women have found it inspiring, from our Voices of Our Future Applicants, to the staff at World Pulse. We hope that the excerpts we’ve provided here touch your hearts and encourage you to take back the power of your own wisdom!

The Five Most Common Ways a Woman Loses Her Innate Female Wisdom

  1. Closing her heart and running away from her emotions. Often, a influential event forces a woman to stop expressing her feelings, stop trusting her intuition, or shut the door on her inner life altogether. This catalyst could be rape or incest, illness, divorce or marriage, the birth of a child, the death of a parent, or any loss.
  2. Losing connection with her physical body as well as the body of the earth. In today’s age of information and uniformity, most people live mostly in their heads, preferring the tidy logical mind over the messy body. We also spend most of our time inside buildings or cars. A woman who lives this way is routinely disconnected from her sensuality, her instincts, and the wondrous, nourishing natural world.
  3. Addiction to doing. Driven by the benchmarks of our dominant culture, a woman can easily betray her sacred feminine in her quest to be productive, accomplished, and successful. Every woman deserves to find fulfilling work. Workaholism, however, is one of the most subversive enemies of a fruitful inner life.
  4. Abandoning her interior life. Relentless busyness and speed leave no time for contemplation. A woman needs silence and solitude, restful periods of slowing down, and open space for spiritual inquiry to cultivate her profound inner wisdom.
  5. Not standing up for her true self. In the workplace and in her intimate relationships with men, a woman is frequently misled, bullied, or seduced into dismissing her emotional intelligence and intuition. Striving to be rational, linear, and concrete—to think like a man—is a very effective way to crush the wisdom of the feminine.

***
Inspired by Returning to My Mother’s House: Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine by Gail Straub (High Point; October 2008; ISBN: 978-0-9630347-5-1; distributed by Chelsea Green Publishing).

Week 4 Classroom Navigation

Week 4 Learning Materials
Vision Mentor Framework (1/3)
Losing Innate Female Wisdom (2/3)
Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine (3/3)

Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week Four Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool
Sidebar Body: 

I'm Standing in the Wake of your Power!

by Jade Frank

When I first joined PulseWire, three years ago, I was the 658th member to sign up. Little did I know that this would be the beginning of a powerful journey for me that has directed my life on a new path, ignited friendships across the world from Kathmandu, Nepal to Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, and lifted me in ways I thought not possible.

At first I was very intimidated by PulseWire and the idea of raising my voice in this community of such amazing women. I began devouring the journal entries of women from around the world who had such interesting, empowering, tragic, and inspiring stories to tell. How could little ol’ me, a young woman from Alaska who hasn’t done much yet in her life and hasn’t experienced true hardship, relate to these women?

Read Jade's full story

Classroom Navigation

Week 4 Learning Materials
Vision Mentor Framework (1/3)
Losing Innate Female Wisdom (2/3)
Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine (3/3)

Week Four Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine (3/3)

Seven Practices for Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine

    1. Face your fear. Home to emotions, intuition, passion, and spirituality, the deep, mysterious feminine can be a terrifying place. Confront your fear of being irrational, unproductive, or out of control, of your own body, and of death. Only then can you begin to fully explore and truly feel your innate feminine power.

    2. Create the trinity of home, roots, and community. To flourish, female wisdom needs a room of its own, a firm sense of place, and an extended, supportive family.

    3. Cultivate a sacred quartet. Silence, Simplicity, Solitude, and Slowness are all vital to sustaining a rich interior life. Develop this quartet through contemplative practices, whether meditation, prayer, yoga, tai chi, or listening to classical music.

    4. Take time to honor your body, your senses, and the natural world. Commit to balancing the rational wisdom of your head with the instinctual wisdom of your body and the earth. Place a priority on restful sleep and sensual pleasures. Take a walk. Plant a garden. Regularly just be outdoors.

    5. Engage in creative arts. Do something every day to strengthen your imagination and your intuitive right brain. Write, draw, dance, sing, sculpt, or play an instrument.

    6. Create your own women’s support group. Reach out to and forge connections with other women—family, friends, neighbors, colleagues, and strangers. Surround yourself with women’s stories, women’s experiences, women’s struggles, and women’s triumphs. Learn from women’s wisdom. (On our online community!)

    7. Embrace the other. Feminine wisdom celebrates inclusiveness and paradoxes. Welcome a diversity of people into your inner life. Stay open to experiences and lifestyles, ethnic and faith traditions, social and political perspectives that contrast with and challenge your own.

    ***
    Inspired by Returning to My Mother’s House: Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine by Gail Straub (High Point; October 2008; ISBN: 978-0-9630347-5-1; distributed by Chelsea Green Publishing).

    Week 4 Classroom Navigation

    Week 4 Learning Materials
    Vision Mentor Framework (1/3)
    Losing Innate Female Wisdom (2/3)
    Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine (3/3)

    Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week Four Assignment

    Helpful Links
    Applicant Group Page
    Listeners Group Page
    Helpful Tools
    Time and Date Converter
    Word Count Tool
Sidebar Body: 

What Brought Me to World Pulse

by Janice Wong

Approximately five years ago, I sat down in a hotel lobby with an intriguing woman who was introduced to me through a mutual friend. This woman had the idea of publishing a magazine that would focus on global issues from a woman’s perspective and provide solutions-based editorial to empower women worldwide. I understood immediately the need for such a magazine and was so captivated by the vision of this woman that I volunteered my services as a consultant.

That woman was the World Pulse Founder, Jensine, who today inspires women from all corners of the globe to stand up and let their voices ring out. Upon relocating to Portland, I renewed contact with Jensine and joined the organization as the Online Community Director, fulfilling a dream to give voice to the silent, lend support to those who feel as if their voice has no significance, and to contribute positively to improving the lives of all – men, women and children.

Read Janice's full story

Classroom Navigation

Week 4 Learning Materials
Vision Mentor Framework (1/3)
Losing Innate Female Wisdom (2/3)
Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine (3/3)

Week Four Assignment

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Week Four Assignment

Assignment

Write a 700 word article that describes:

  • What is your personal vision for your life, your community and/or the world?
  • Why do you want to be a Voices of Our Correspondent and how will this help you
    achieve your vision?

Instructions

  • Your article should be 700 words or fewer.
  • Post your article in your personal journal on World Pulse by April 29th, 2013 at
    11:55pm Pacific Daylight Time (PDT).* To do this, go to your Journal (if you are not already logged in you will be directed to do so). On the right hand side of the page, there will be an orange button that says "Post to Your Journal". Once you click on this button, you will be able to post your assignment.
  • You may put any title you want on your journal entry, but it MUST be tagged with
    the following (you can cut and paste the text that follows): 2013 VOF Week 4
  • If you would like tips on how to tag, click here!

  • Get to know your fellow Voices of Our Future applicants on World Pulse online community: visit their profiles, comment on their journal entries, add them as your friends, and explore our online community!

Questions? Please check the Frequently Asked Questions in the sidebar to the left.

Week 4 Classroom Navigation

Week 4 Learning Materials
Vision Mentor Framework (1/3)
Losing Innate Female Wisdom (2/3)
Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine (3/3)

Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week Four Assignment

Helpful Links
Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page
Helpful Tools
Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool
Sidebar Body: 

Week 4 Classroom Navigation

Week 4 Learning Materials
Vision Mentor Framework (1/3)
Losing Innate Female Wisdom (2/3)
Taking Back the Wisdom of the Feminine (3/3)

Once you are done with the 3 readings, access Week Four Assignment

Helpful Links

Applicant Group Page
Listeners Group Page

Helpful Tools

Time and Date Converter
Word Count Tool

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Where should I post my article?
In your personal journal on PulseWire. Do not post your final assignment in the Voices of Our Future Group journal. This Group is reserved for updates, discussions and questions.

2. When is the assignment due?
The assignments are due on: April 8, April 15, April 22 and April 29 by 11:55pm PDT (Pacific Daylight Time), or GMT-7.
You can check what time this is in your local timezone at this link: Time Zone Converter

3. What should I title my assignment?
You can title your assignment anything you want, however you must tag your assignment correctly. Each weekly assignment has specific instruction on how to tag.

4. Can I write my story in my native language?
At this time we as that you submit your assignment in English. However, you can use the Google Translation tool, which is at the very top of this page, to help. Click on the "Translate page" tab to find your language. But remember, this is not a perfect tool and there may be mistakes.

5. How will I know if my assignment is 700 words or less?
Word Count Tool is a simple and quick online tool to find your word count. Simply copy and paste your article in the form and click on the Submit button. Your word count will appear under the form.

If you are using Microsoft Word, select the text of your article. Click on Tools in the top menu. Select Word Count from the drop down menu.

6. Who will be reading my assignment?
World Pulse has gathered together an international panel of Listeners, composed of World Pulse staff, community members and volunteers. This panel will be reviewing your assignments based on the criteria listed on the Applicants Group page.

You are encouraged to meet the Listeners by visiting their group here. Although this group is closed to non-Listeners, you will be able to friend Listeners and stay informed of what is happening "behind the scenes."

7. I still have a question. What do I do?
We encourage you to post your question to the Voices of Our Future Applicants Group, so that all applicants may benefit from your inquiry. We will answer it as fast as we can.